Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
11 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Donald Parsons-2

Colin,
The last time I did the upgrade I lost all of my gmail correspondence and
users.
Is there a way to upgrade while gmail remains untouched?
Thanks
Donald Parsons

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Colin Law
On 28 February 2017 at 12:49, Donald Parsons <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Colin,
> The last time I did the upgrade I lost all of my gmail correspondence and
> users.
> Is there a way to upgrade while gmail remains untouched?

Normally gmail is stored on google's servers, unless you are not using
google's web interface for your email. There is no way that an upgrade
to Ubuntu will affect your gmail stored on their servers.  How are you
reading your mail?

Colin

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

David Fletcher-5
In reply to this post by Donald Parsons-2
On Tue, 2017-02-28 at 07:49 -0500, Donald Parsons wrote:
> Colin,
> The last time I did the upgrade I lost all of my gmail correspondence
> and
> users.
>

I've said it before. No doubt others have said it before. No doubt I
will say it again:-
Hard drives are incredibly cheap, so never, ever run the risk of
trashing a working installation even if it is out of date. Back up all
of the files you think you might need to an external flash drive, USB
thumb drive(s), SD card(s), whatever you like. Download the latedt
version of your new operating system and burn to DVD or whatever your
system needs. Put in a new hard drive and install your new OS. Run the
updates, reinstate your users, recover your files from the backups you
just made. Everybody is happy.
When you get that "Oh, SHIT moment, just swap the old hard drive back
in, recover the file(s) you missed, go back to the new hard drive.
That's why you don't trash the old OS until you're absolutely certain
you've recovered everything you need from it.
Works for me :)

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:32:54 +0000, David Fletcher wrote:

>On Tue, 2017-02-28 at 07:49 -0500, Donald Parsons wrote:
>> Colin,
>> The last time I did the upgrade I lost all of my gmail correspondence
>> and
>> users.
>>  
>
>I've said it before. No doubt others have said it before. No doubt I
>will say it again:-
>Hard drives are incredibly cheap, so never, ever run the risk of
>trashing a working installation even if it is out of date. Back up all
>of the files you think you might need to an external flash drive, USB
>thumb drive(s), SD card(s), whatever you like. Download the latedt
>version of your new operating system and burn to DVD or whatever your
>system needs. Put in a new hard drive and install your new OS. Run the
>updates, reinstate your users, recover your files from the backups you
>just made. Everybody is happy.
>When you get that "Oh, SHIT moment, just swap the old hard drive back
>in, recover the file(s) you missed, go back to the new hard drive.
>That's why you don't trash the old OS until you're absolutely certain
>you've recovered everything you need from it.
>Works for me :)

DVDs aren't secure backup medias. CDRAM in theory are good, but they
sometimes don't work, at least they provide not enough space and they
are much to expensive. Much likely they are hard to get. An external
USB HDD or just a case with an USB to SATA controller + an SATA drive
are cheap. The only drawback are that the all-in-one USB drives as well
as most cases with a controller, ship with a standby mode. Some provide
firmware to disable the standby mode others don't. The issue with Linux
is software that wakes up drives that go to sleep by the standby mode.
GVFS does, smartd does and several other software does, too. Either
remove this software, or take care that the HDDs don't spin down and up
every 20 to 30 minutes. The best bet anyway is to disconnect an
external backup drive after the backup is done. From a live media you
e.g. could "sudo tar --xattrs -czf" or "sudo cp -ai" all directories.
I do regular backups to external drives this way and avoid using rsync
or other methods, but this is just a matter of taste. Some might
recommend to exclude a few directories, but there's no need to do this,
since they are anyway more ore less empty after a shutdown. The next
command after the backup is done shut be "echo $?". If the output
should be "0" you could ignore all warnings, e.g. "removed leading /"
or "socket" related warnings. Just if the output of "echo $?"
shouldn't be "0" something is fishy. In addition you e.g. could run
"sudo diff -r --no-dereference" after a "sudo cp -ai" and open the
"tar.gz" archives by a simple click with your favored file manager, to
check if the backups are ok.

0,02 €,
Ralf


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 19:13:16 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

>On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:32:54 +0000, David Fletcher wrote:
>>On Tue, 2017-02-28 at 07:49 -0500, Donald Parsons wrote:  
>>> Colin,
>>> The last time I did the upgrade I lost all of my gmail
>>> correspondence and
>>> users.
>>>    
>>
>>I've said it before. No doubt others have said it before. No doubt I
>>will say it again:-
>>Hard drives are incredibly cheap, so never, ever run the risk of
>>trashing a working installation even if it is out of date. Back up all
>>of the files you think you might need to an external flash drive, USB
>>thumb drive(s), SD card(s), whatever you like. Download the latedt
>>version of your new operating system and burn to DVD or whatever your
>>system needs. Put in a new hard drive and install your new OS. Run the
>>updates, reinstate your users, recover your files from the backups you
>>just made. Everybody is happy.
>>When you get that "Oh, SHIT moment, just swap the old hard drive back
>>in, recover the file(s) you missed, go back to the new hard drive.
>>That's why you don't trash the old OS until you're absolutely certain
>>you've recovered everything you need from it.
>>Works for me :)  
>
>DVDs aren't secure backup medias. CDRAM in theory are good, but they
>sometimes don't work, at least they provide not enough space and they
>are much to expensive. Much likely they are hard to get. An external
>USB HDD or just a case with an USB to SATA controller + an SATA drive
>are cheap. The only drawback are that the all-in-one USB drives as well
>as most cases with a controller, ship with a standby mode. Some provide
>firmware to disable the standby mode others don't. The issue with Linux
>is software that wakes up drives that go to sleep by the standby mode.
>GVFS does, smartd does and several other software does, too. Either
>remove this software, or take care that the HDDs don't spin down and up
>every 20 to 30 minutes. The best bet anyway is to disconnect an
>external backup drive after the backup is done. From a live media you
>e.g. could "sudo tar --xattrs -czf" or "sudo cp -ai" all directories.
>I do regular backups to external drives this way and avoid using rsync
>or other methods, but this is just a matter of taste. Some might
>recommend to exclude a few directories, but there's no need to do this,
>since they are anyway more ore less empty after a shutdown. The next
>command after the backup is done shut be "echo $?". If the output
>should be "0" you could ignore all warnings, e.g. "removed leading /"
>or "socket" related warnings. Just if the output of "echo $?"
>shouldn't be "0" something is fishy. In addition you e.g. could run
>"sudo diff -r --no-dereference" after a "sudo cp -ai" and open the
>"tar.gz" archives by a simple click with your favored file manager, to
>check if the backups are ok.
>
>0,02 €,
>Ralf

Oops, a few typos, but more important, I forget to mention globbing.
Send us the output of

  "ls -hAl"

so we could help you to use commands such as "cp" and "tar" without
running into globbing issues.


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 19:18:37 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

>On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 19:13:16 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>>On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:32:54 +0000, David Fletcher wrote:  
>>>On Tue, 2017-02-28 at 07:49 -0500, Donald Parsons wrote:    
>>>> Colin,
>>>> The last time I did the upgrade I lost all of my gmail
>>>> correspondence and
>>>> users.
>>>>      
>>>
>>>I've said it before. No doubt others have said it before. No doubt I
>>>will say it again:-
>>>Hard drives are incredibly cheap, so never, ever run the risk of
>>>trashing a working installation even if it is out of date. Back up
>>>all of the files you think you might need to an external flash
>>>drive, USB thumb drive(s), SD card(s), whatever you like. Download
>>>the latedt version of your new operating system and burn to DVD or
>>>whatever your system needs. Put in a new hard drive and install your
>>>new OS. Run the updates, reinstate your users, recover your files
>>>from the backups you just made. Everybody is happy.
>>>When you get that "Oh, SHIT moment, just swap the old hard drive back
>>>in, recover the file(s) you missed, go back to the new hard drive.
>>>That's why you don't trash the old OS until you're absolutely certain
>>>you've recovered everything you need from it.
>>>Works for me :)    
>>
>>DVDs aren't secure backup medias. CDRAM in theory are good, but they
>>sometimes don't work, at least they provide not enough space and they
>>are much to expensive. Much likely they are hard to get. An external
>>USB HDD or just a case with an USB to SATA controller + an SATA drive
>>are cheap. The only drawback are that the all-in-one USB drives as
>>well as most cases with a controller, ship with a standby mode. Some
>>provide firmware to disable the standby mode others don't. The issue
>>with Linux is software that wakes up drives that go to sleep by the
>>standby mode. GVFS does, smartd does and several other software does,
>>too. Either remove this software, or take care that the HDDs don't
>>spin down and up every 20 to 30 minutes. The best bet anyway is to
>>disconnect an external backup drive after the backup is done. From a
>>live media you e.g. could "sudo tar --xattrs -czf" or "sudo cp -ai"
>>all directories. I do regular backups to external drives this way and
>>avoid using rsync or other methods, but this is just a matter of
>>taste. Some might recommend to exclude a few directories, but there's
>>no need to do this, since they are anyway more ore less empty after a
>>shutdown. The next command after the backup is done shut be "echo
>>$?". If the output should be "0" you could ignore all warnings, e.g.
>>"removed leading /" or "socket" related warnings. Just if the output
>>of "echo $?" shouldn't be "0" something is fishy. In addition you
>>e.g. could run "sudo diff -r --no-dereference" after a "sudo cp -ai"
>>and open the "tar.gz" archives by a simple click with your favored
>>file manager, to check if the backups are ok.
>>
>>0,02 €,
>>Ralf  
>
>Oops, a few typos, but more important, I forget to mention globbing.
>Send us the output of
>
>  "ls -hAl"

:D

"ls -hAl /"

>
>so we could help you to use commands such as "cp" and "tar" without
>running into globbing issues.



--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Robert Heller
In reply to this post by Ralf Mardorf-2
What *I* do:

I use LVM on my hard drives (RAID mirror set). When *I* upgrade, I create a
fresh Logical Volume for the new root (/) and install there. The old OS is
untouched. I use a separate /boot file system (it is also its own RAID mirror
set). Booting the old os is just a selection from the grub menu. And the old
root file system is available for mounting RO. Non-OS stuff (eg /home, etc.)
are on separate Logical Volumes / file systems.

Oh, and I run the new OS as a VM for awhile before installing it on the bare
metal, so there are no suprises there (or very few).

And yes, I also run Amanda and backup to a spare hard drive, with a "virtual"
tape changer.


At Tue, 28 Feb 2017 19:13:16 +0100 "Ubuntu user technical support,  not for general discussions" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:32:54 +0000, David Fletcher wrote:
> >On Tue, 2017-02-28 at 07:49 -0500, Donald Parsons wrote:
> >> Colin,
> >> The last time I did the upgrade I lost all of my gmail correspondence
> >> and
> >> users.
> >>  
> >
> >I've said it before. No doubt others have said it before. No doubt I
> >will say it again:-
> >Hard drives are incredibly cheap, so never, ever run the risk of
> >trashing a working installation even if it is out of date. Back up all
> >of the files you think you might need to an external flash drive, USB
> >thumb drive(s), SD card(s), whatever you like. Download the latedt
> >version of your new operating system and burn to DVD or whatever your
> >system needs. Put in a new hard drive and install your new OS. Run the
> >updates, reinstate your users, recover your files from the backups you
> >just made. Everybody is happy.
> >When you get that "Oh, SHIT moment, just swap the old hard drive back
> >in, recover the file(s) you missed, go back to the new hard drive.
> >That's why you don't trash the old OS until you're absolutely certain
> >you've recovered everything you need from it.
> >Works for me :)
>
> DVDs aren't secure backup medias. CDRAM in theory are good, but they
> sometimes don't work, at least they provide not enough space and they
> are much to expensive. Much likely they are hard to get. An external
> USB HDD or just a case with an USB to SATA controller + an SATA drive
> are cheap. The only drawback are that the all-in-one USB drives as well
> as most cases with a controller, ship with a standby mode. Some provide
> firmware to disable the standby mode others don't. The issue with Linux
> is software that wakes up drives that go to sleep by the standby mode.
> GVFS does, smartd does and several other software does, too. Either
> remove this software, or take care that the HDDs don't spin down and up
> every 20 to 30 minutes. The best bet anyway is to disconnect an
> external backup drive after the backup is done. From a live media you
> e.g. could "sudo tar --xattrs -czf" or "sudo cp -ai" all directories.
> I do regular backups to external drives this way and avoid using rsync
> or other methods, but this is just a matter of taste. Some might
> recommend to exclude a few directories, but there's no need to do this,
> since they are anyway more ore less empty after a shutdown. The next
> command after the backup is done shut be "echo $?". If the output
> should be "0" you could ignore all warnings, e.g. "removed leading /"
> or "socket" related warnings. Just if the output of "echo $?"
> shouldn't be "0" something is fishy. In addition you e.g. could run
> "sudo diff -r --no-dereference" after a "sudo cp -ai" and open the
> "tar.gz" archives by a simple click with your favored file manager, to
> check if the backups are ok.
>
> 0,02 €,
> Ralf
>
>
--
Robert Heller             -- 978-544-6933
Deepwoods Software        -- Custom Software Services
http://www.deepsoft.com/  -- Linux Administration Services
[hidden email]       -- Webhosting Services
                                                         


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Tue, 28 Feb 2017 14:20:28 -0500 (EST), Robert Heller wrote:

>What *I* do:
>
>I use LVM on my hard drives (RAID mirror set). When *I* upgrade, I
>create a fresh Logical Volume for the new root (/) and install there.
>The old OS is untouched. I use a separate /boot file system (it is
>also its own RAID mirror set). Booting the old os is just a selection
>from the grub menu. And the old root file system is available for
>mounting RO. Non-OS stuff (eg /home, etc.) are on separate Logical
>Volumes / file systems.
>
>Oh, and I run the new OS as a VM for awhile before installing it on
>the bare metal, so there are no suprises there (or very few).
>
>And yes, I also run Amanda and backup to a spare hard drive, with a
>"virtual" tape changer.

IMO that's far too individual and just confusing the OP ;). I'm for
example using syslinux instead of GRUB and to avoid chain-loading I do
something strange and bind /boot:

[weremouse@moonstudio ~]$ grep bind /etc/fstab
/mnt/archlinux/.boot/ubuntu_moonstudio/boot /boot          none   bind              0 0

From the context we could assume that the op neither does use RAID,
VMs, nor something else unusual, such as a bootloader, that is unusual
for the averaged Ubuntu user.

RAID is even not an option for several tasks. I for example use Linux
as a real-time DAW, so raid would be much likely counter-productive and
a VM would be completely unusable ;).

Lets stay with backup options that are likely more pleasant for the
averaged desktop user. IMO apart from what I prefer, there are just
rsync based options ok and much likely just without RAID, VMs, tapes and
what soever individual expert solutions.

Regards,
Ralf


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Oliver Grawert
hi,
On Di, 2017-02-28 at 20:37 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

>
> IMO that's far too individual and just confusing the OP ;). I'm for
> example using syslinux instead of GRUB and to avoid chain-loading I
> do...


*grin*
... and you think thats less confusing and individual ? 

ciao
        oli
--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

signature.asc (188 bytes) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Wed, 01 Mar 2017 01:44:45 +0100, Oliver Grawert wrote:

>hi,
>On Di, 2017-02-28 at 20:37 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>> 
>>
>> IMO that's far too individual and just confusing the OP ;). I'm for
>> example using syslinux instead of GRUB and to avoid chain-loading I
>> do...
>>   
>
>*grin*
>... and you think thats less confusing and individual ? 
Hi,

that's the point. The OP IMO should post the output of

  ls -hAl /

when running the outdated Ubuntu and I forgot the output of

  cat /etc/fstab

too. So we could help to run the commands to backup Ubuntu (hopefully
to an external HDD and not to a DVD or an USB stick or other insecure
media). Then the OP should download and burn an Ubuntu. The attached
script might help, assuming the OP should use 64-bit architecture. After
making it executable by

  cd path_to_the/script
  chmod a+x luamd64_1610.sh

running

  luamd64_1610.sh ubuntu 16.04.2

the script will download the Ubuntu LTS and verify it by the gpg
signature. With this live DVD it's possible to make a backup and to
already take a look at the LTS before updating the installed Ubuntu.
The script allows to download any other _desktop_ flavour

  ubuntu-mate
  ubuntu
  kubuntu
  lubuntu
  ubuntu-gnome
  ubuntukylin
  ubuntustudio
  xubuntu

and to automatically verify the download against an public Ubuntu key.

Regards,
Ralf

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

luamd64_1610.sh (2K) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|  
Report Content as Inappropriate

Re: Best Twitter client for Ubuntu 15.10

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Wed, 1 Mar 2017 04:49:25 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>  cd path_to_the/script
>  chmod a+x luamd64_1610.sh
>
>running
>
>  luamd64_1610.sh ubuntu 16.04.2

This should read

  ./luamd64_1610.sh ubuntu 16.04.2


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Loading...