Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

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Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
Hi,

I need a new mobo and PSU, this unfortunately means a new CPU and new
RAM, too. Does somebody use on of the following components or could
recommend for or against one of those components [1]?

Could somebody recommend something else?

The mobo must provide at least one PS/2 socket and one PCI slot, not
only PCIe. I can spend < 200,- EUR and this won't change soon, but
I urgently need a new computer.
At least one PCIe slot, one PCI slot and one USB port must have an IRQ
that isn't shared with anything else.

The computer I'm using now has got an AMD dual core 2.1 GHz, SSE2 only,
4 GiB RAM, PCIe and PCI slots, SATA 2 and USB 2.

Actually I don't need something better, but I don't trust the hardware
anymore. The only requirement for a new computer are at least the same
features + > SSE2, since SSE2 was the only issue I experience with my
current machine, when the hardware wasn't fishy.

Regards,
Ralf

CPU

https://www.reichelt.de/Processors-AMD/AMD-A4-7300/3/index.html?ACTION=3&GROUPID=6108&ARTICLE=148724&OFFSET=16&SID=96WKHx-6wQATcAACJQPws63d7c194437a1deb9681d1ab907a0a41&LANGUAGE=EN

+

Mobo

https://www.reichelt.de/Motherboards-AMD/GA-F2A88XM-HD3/3/index.html?ACTION=3&GROUPID=6132&ARTICLE=142518&OFFSET=16&SID=96WKHx-6wQATcAACJQPws63d7c194437a1deb9681d1ab907a0a41&LANGUAGE=EN

+

RAM

https://www.reichelt.de/DDR3-Single-Modules/30IT0416-1011/3/index.html?ACTION=3&GROUPID=7335&ARTICLE=182757&OFFSET=16&SID=96WKHx-6wQATcAACJQPws63d7c194437a1deb9681d1ab907a0a41&LANGUAGE=EN

+

PSU

https://www.reichelt.de/PC-Netzteile-Standard/XILENCE-XN044/3/index.html?ACTION=3&GROUPID=5015&ARTICLE=151039&OFFSET=16&SID=96WKHx-6wQATcAACJQPws63d7c194437a1deb9681d1ab907a0a41&LANGUAGE=EN


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PS: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
And while I'm at it, does anybody know a cheap case for 3.5" HDDs with
an USB controller, that has no standby mode or at least allows to
disable the standby mode?

A few days ago I got a fantec and support tries to help me [1], but most
likely there's no way to disable standby mode.

Regards,
Ralf

[1]
For those speaking German:
http://www.fantec-forum.de/index.php/Thread/7751-DB-ALU2e-Auto-Sleep/?postID=39071#post39071


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Re: PS: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Liam Proven
On 15 February 2017 at 15:38, Ralf Mardorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
> And while I'm at it, does anybody know a cheap case for 3.5" HDDs with
> an USB controller, that has no standby mode or at least allows to
> disable the standby mode?
>
> A few days ago I got a fantec and support tries to help me [1], but most
> likely there's no way to disable standby mode.


I thought -- think -- that this is a function of the USB settings for
the device, or for the whole system, and not the case.

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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

compdoc
In reply to this post by Ralf Mardorf-2
On 02/15/2017 02:06 AM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

> Does somebody use on of the following components or could
> recommend for or against one of those components [1]?

I use an  A4-6320 APU in a Gigabyte F2A85X-UP4 with no problems. Sound
and video and everything works fine.

I put this system together to run Ubuntu because it was the least
valuable equipment I had in stock, and I wanted a PC for my living room.

There are much faster systems for around the same cost if you were to
buy something new using Intel's cpus and motherboards. And it doesn't
have to be the latest models, for example their Pentium G4400 Skylake
cpus are wicked fast. For a little less you can get a Celeron.

I've never heard of a XILENCE psu, so hopefully it will last more than a
year. Cheap psus often live about that long.

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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by Ralf Mardorf-2
On 15 February 2017 at 09:06, Ralf Mardorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
> At least one PCIe slot, one PCI slot and one USB port must have an IRQ
> that isn't shared with anything else.


PCI should not be that hard to find. PCI-e is normal.

A PS/2 port is most often found on gamers' motherboards today. Some
extreme gamers feel that USB mice suffer from latency or jitter and
prefer PS/2 mice. I think this is as completely untrue as homeopathy,
but hey, their choice.

(I suppose I should not criticise too much myself here, as I am typing
on an IBM Model M keyboard that was made on 1993-01-25. At least one
of my colleagues on my current contract is younger. It is attached to
a Thinkpad X220 that I just bought last month but which is itself 3-4
years old.)

You cannot get the IRQ line specified, though, I think. On
plug-and-play systems -- anything with ACPI-capable firmware -- this
is specified dynamically at boot time. On PCI systems, IRQ sharing is
normal, as IRQs are level-triggered not edge-triggered as they were on
ISA computers.

So many things might share the IRQ of any given device, and that IRQ
could vary from one boot up to the next.

Windows offers ways to reserve such resources but I don't think Windows does.

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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

David Fletcher-5
In reply to this post by Ralf Mardorf-2
On Wed, 2017-02-15 at 10:06 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I need a new mobo and PSU, this unfortunately means a new CPU and new
> RAM, too. Does somebody use on of the following components or could
> recommend for or against one of those components [1]?

It was maybe 9 years ago that I last built a PC. I chose to use an Asus
motherboard with an Asus built cheap (~£20) graphics card with an ATI
chip on it (the nvidia one was unsatisfactory), AMD X2 low energy
processor and an Earthwatts (Antec?) power supply.

Various upgrades later such as adding a USB3 PCIe card with a front
panel universal flash card reader, hard drive caddy system, and it's
all still working perfectly.

Asus apparently claims that it uses better than the usual cheap
electrolytic capacitors which should help with its longevity. Perhaps
others can confirm this?

Unfortunately I did have one particular "issue" which AFAICT would have
been avoided had I chosen a board to take an Intel chip. I've not had
time to play around and see if this issue has been resolved or not,
having found an excellent work around.

Dave

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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

David Fletcher-5
PS:-
Whenever I buy parts, which is infrequently, I look for the low energy
option. I have no need at all for a system with stellar performance, it
needs to Just Work.

The processor is low energy with a huge heat sink on it and runs at
about 35°C. I always look for the lower spindle speed on a hard drive.
I'm currently running Toshiba drives in my desktop, server and laptop,
no problems so far.

My reasoning is that lower power, lower speed implies lower internal
stress which should lead to better long term reliability. I've not had
any component failures in a long time now....

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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by Liam Proven
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 16:53:41 +0000, Liam Proven wrote:

>On 15 February 2017 at 09:06, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>> At least one PCIe slot, one PCI slot and one USB port must have an
>> IRQ that isn't shared with anything else.  
>
>PCI should not be that hard to find. PCI-e is normal.
>
>A PS/2 port is most often found on gamers' motherboards today. Some
>extreme gamers feel that USB mice suffer from latency or jitter and
>prefer PS/2 mice. I think this is as completely untrue as homeopathy,
>but hey, their choice.

I want a PS/2 socket for the keyboard, because I'm using USB with
real-time priority for an audio device. I'm already using an USB mouse
and it could cause issues when I'm using my Focusrite Scarlett 18i20
2nd Gen a pro-sumer USB audio interface, instead of my RME HDSP AIO a
professional PCIe audio interface.

>On PCI systems, IRQ sharing is normal

Not for the mobo I'm using now. Any mobo that doesn't support an
individual IRQ for at least one PCI card and one PCIe card is
completely useless for me, since I need them for real-time audio, too.

The kernel seems to care a little bit about this, since on older
kernels PCIe shared the IRQ with my mobo's onboard graphics and new
kernels assign an individual IRQ to the graphics.

Sometimes it's possible to get rid of a shared IRQ, e.g. by
unbinding devices, I'm doing this by a script:

$ tail -75 /usr/local/sbin/rttune

case $(basename $0) in
  tuning)      # script 2013-Apr-05 compatibility
    all="$all\n--no-misc\n--unbind";;
  tuning-rice) # script 2013-Apr-05 compatibility
    all="$all\n--no-envy\n--no-misc\n--unbind";;
  *)           # new
    all=""
    while [ "$1" ]; do
      case $1 in
      ""|--log-status)
        ;;
      --all)
        all="$all\n--no-envy\n--no-hdsp\n--no-misc\n--unbind";;
      --no-envy)
        all="$all\n--no-envy";;
      --no-hdsp)
        all="$all\n--no-hdsp";;
      --no-misc)
        all="$all\n--no-misc";;
      --unbind)
        all="$all\n--unbind";;
      *)
        all="\n--help";;
      esac
      shift
    done;;
esac

all=$(printf "$all" | sort -u)
for option in $all; do
  case $option in
  --no-envy) # TerraTec EWX 24/96
    sudo modprobe -r snd_ice1712;;
  --no-hdsp) # RME HDSPe AIO
    sudo modprobe -r snd_hdspm;;
  --no-misc) # Misc
    sudo modprobe -r firewire-ohci
    sudo modprobe -r firewire_core
    sudo modprobe -r ppdev # parallel port
    sudo modprobe -r lp    # printer
    # Not removed by script 2013-Apr-05
    sudo modprobe -r parport_pc
    sudo modprobe -r parport
    sudo modprobe -r pata_atiixp;;
  --unbind) # Unbinding devices
    cd /sys/bus/pci/drivers/ohci-pci
    test -h 0000:00:13.2 && printf "0000:00:13.2" | sudo tee unbind >/dev/null
    test -h 0000:00:13.4 && printf "0000:00:13.4" | sudo tee unbind >/dev/null;;
  *) # Help
    usage
    exit;;
  esac
done

# Log file
l="/var/log/tuning.log"
case $(basename $0) in tuning|tuning-rice)
  all="";;
esac
echo "$(basename $0) "$all                       | sudo tee $l >/dev/null
echo "# rtirq status           "                 | sudo tee -a $l >/dev/null
rtirq status                                     | sudo tee -a $l >/dev/null
echo "# grep 18: /proc/interrupts"               | sudo tee -a $l >/dev/null
grep 18: /proc/interrupts                        | sudo tee -a $l >/dev/null
echo "# grep usb /proc/interrupts | grep -v 18:" | sudo tee -a $l >/dev/null
grep usb /proc/interrupts | grep -v 18:          | sudo tee -a $l >/dev/null
echo                                             | sudo tee -a $l >/dev/null
printf "$(date) - $(uname -r) - "                | sudo tee -a $l >/dev/null
grep PRETTY_NAME /etc/os-release                 | sudo tee -a $l >/dev/null
printf "\n#\n\n"
cat $l
printf "\n#\n\n"

exit

>So many things might share the IRQ of any given device, and that IRQ
>could vary from one boot up to the next.

Not the mobo I'm using now and I doubt that anybody using the PC for
real-time tasks, music, CNC etc. wants to use such a PC.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by compdoc
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 09:52:53 -0700, compdoc wrote:
>On 02/15/2017 02:06 AM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>
>> Does somebody use on of the following components or could
>> recommend for or against one of those components [1]?  
>
>I use an  A4-6320 APU in a Gigabyte F2A85X-UP4 with no problems. Sound
>and video and everything works fine.

I'm uncertain. I more or less randomly preferred the AMD A4-7300 over
the A4-6320, because my favourite dealer sells the A4-7300 for 1.55 EUR
less, than the A4-6320 and I couldn't find good comparisons of CPUs in
this price range.

Video is important, the onboard audio device is completely
uninteresting for me, I'll disable it, because I own several pro-sumer
audio interfaces and a professional PCIe audio interface.

>There are much faster systems for around the same cost if you were to
>buy something new using Intel's cpus and motherboards. And it doesn't
>have to be the latest models, for example their Pentium G4400 Skylake
>cpus are wicked fast. For a little less you can get a Celeron.

I don't have a little less money.

>I've never heard of a XILENCE psu, so hopefully it will last more than
>a year. Cheap psus often live about that long.

I don't have bad experiences with cheap PC PSUs, the one I'm using now
most likely is around 10 years old and I even didn't replace a capacitor
or resistor, while most repairs in the last decade I've done were
replacing capacitors in f...ine switching power supplies of audio and
video gear.

Regards,
Ralf



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Re: PS: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by Liam Proven
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 16:48:03 +0000, Liam Proven wrote:

>On 15 February 2017 at 15:38, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>> And while I'm at it, does anybody know a cheap case for 3.5" HDDs
>> with an USB controller, that has no standby mode or at least allows
>> to disable the standby mode?
>>
>> A few days ago I got a fantec and support tries to help me [1], but
>> most likely there's no way to disable standby mode.  
>
>I thought -- think -- that this is a function of the USB settings for
>the device, or for the whole system, and not the case.

The whole system is a case with the USB controller. It doesn't matter
what HDD you mount to this case. It's neither a HDD setting, nor a
computer USB setting, it's the case's USB controller who does cause the
standby mode.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by David Fletcher-5
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 18:05:58 +0000, David Fletcher wrote:
>On Wed, 2017-02-15 at 10:06 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>It was maybe 9 years ago that I last built a PC. I chose to use an Asus
>motherboard with an Asus built cheap (~£20) graphics card with an ATI
>chip on it (the nvidia one was unsatisfactory), AMD X2 low energy
>processor and an Earthwatts (Antec?) power supply.

The mobo I'm using now likely is around 10 years old. It's an M2A-VM
HDMI with an onboard ATI graphics, but I also have got a NVIDI. IT
depends to the Linux install what graphics is the better for my
computer usage. The CPU is a

$ sudo hwinfo --cpu | grep Model -A1 | head -2
  Model: 15.107.2 "AMD Athlon(tm) X2 Dual Core Processor BE-2350"
  Features:
fpu,vme,de,pse,tsc,msr,pae,mce,cx8,apic,sep,mtrr,pge,mca,cmov,pat,pse36,clflush,mmx,fxsr,sse,sse2,ht,syscall,nx,mmxext,fxsr_opt,rdtscp,lm,3dnowext,3dnow,rep_good,nopl,extd_apicid,eagerfpu,pni,cx16,lahf_lm,cmp_legacy,svm,extapic,cr8_legacy,3dnowprefetch,vmmcall,lbrv

It's a 2.1GHz. I like it because I don't need a faster CPU and because
it only need 45 W. The only issue with this CPU is, that some
proprietary Linux music software needs more than just sse2.

Actually the reason that I now need a new computer is, that I don't
trust the mobo and the PSU anymore. I won't start repairing, because it
will start with a capacitor and end with a fans or something else, in
the end a capacitor, fan, controller are less expensive, but you never
know what will break next and especially at what time it will happen. I
want to make music without fearing issues related to aged hardware.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by David Fletcher-5
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 18:21:41 +0000, David Fletcher wrote:

>PS:-
>Whenever I buy parts, which is infrequently, I look for the low energy
>option. I have no need at all for a system with stellar performance, it
>needs to Just Work.
>
>The processor is low energy with a huge heat sink on it and runs at
>about 35°C. I always look for the lower spindle speed on a hard drive.
>I'm currently running Toshiba drives in my desktop, server and laptop,
>no problems so far.
>
>My reasoning is that lower power, lower speed implies lower internal
>stress which should lead to better long term reliability. I've not had
>any component failures in a long time now....

Electricity is very expensive in Germany and apart from this the
computer should be as silent as possible when using it for music.
I don't need much horse power, what I need are chip sets that don't
increase jitter and don't cause other issues for real-time audio usage.

I also don't need much horse power for a virtual studio in the box, I'm
using external gear, not only virtual synth, effect plugins and things
like this. 2 * 2.1GHz and 4 GiB RAM are ok, it's just a little bit slow
when compiling a kernel.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

compdoc
In reply to this post by Ralf Mardorf-2
On 02/15/2017 11:40 AM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

> I'm uncertain. I more or less randomly preferred the AMD A4-7300 over
> the A4-6320, because my favourite dealer sells the A4-7300 for 1.55 EUR
> less, than the A4-6320 and I couldn't find good comparisons of CPUs in
> this price range.

I was only suggesting your A4-7300 should work as well as my A4-6320.
They are almost identical, except the A4-7300 has different onboard video.

> For a little less you can get a Celeron.
> I don't have a little less money.

That means if you want to spend less, get a celeron. I only use
Pentiums, which can read/write cpu caches many times faster than any AMD
APU, and can read/write main memory about 3 times faster than any APU.
To me, thats as important to the over-all speed of a system, as the
ability to crunch numbers. The celeron should be similar, but likely has
smaller caches.


> I don't have bad experiences with cheap PC PSUs, the one I'm using now
> most likely is around 10 years old and I even didn't replace a capacitor

They don't make PSUs like they used to. I replace several cheap power
supplies a year for bad caps. I replace them with PSUs that cost $50 to
$65 because I warranty parts and labor, and cheap parts can cost me money.

I've found that any 80+ Certified PSU from a reputable brand, will last
years.

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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by Ralf Mardorf-2
On 15 February 2017 at 18:40, Ralf Mardorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
> I want a PS/2 socket for the keyboard, because I'm using USB with
> real-time priority for an audio device. I'm already using an USB mouse
> and it could cause issues when I'm using my Focusrite Scarlett 18i20
> 2nd Gen a pro-sumer USB audio interface, instead of my RME HDSP AIO a
> professional PCIe audio interface.


So, dedicate a USB bus to it. Add a card with a USB2 or USB3
controller on it. Surely that is much easier?

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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 19:45:25 +0000, Liam Proven wrote:
>On 15 February 2017 at 18:40, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>> I want a PS/2 socket for the keyboard, because I'm using USB with
>> real-time priority for an audio device. I'm already using an USB
>> mouse and it could cause issues when I'm using my Focusrite Scarlett
>> 18i20 2nd Gen a pro-sumer USB audio interface, instead of my RME
>> HDSP AIO a professional PCIe audio interface.  
>
>So, dedicate a USB bus to it. Add a card with a USB2 or USB3
>controller on it. Surely that is much easier?

USB 3 would gain me nothing,
https://support.focusrite.com/hc/en-gb/articles/208095469-USB-2-0-vs-USB-3-0 .

However, the issue can't be solved by making the used USB port head of
the USB ports. This might help a little bit, but the major issue is,
that you only can assign real-time priority to all USB ports.

I can't comment a PCI or PCIe card to USB, but at least it would share
real-time priority with all the other USB ports and it might cause
additional issue by sharing a quasi split PCIe slot. Again, I can't
comment such USB cards, but I know that several PCIe slots often are
not several slots, they are quasi one split slot.


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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by compdoc
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 12:30:59 -0700, compdoc wrote:
>That means if you want to spend less, get a celeron.

I still will take a look at a few mobos. The problem seems to be that
mobos for Intel CPUs in the lower price range seldom provide PS/2 and
PCI ports, they tend to provide USB and PCIe only.


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Re: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by compdoc
On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 12:30:59 -0700, compdoc wrote:
>That means if you want to spend less, get a celeron. I only use
>Pentiums, which can read/write cpu caches many times faster than any
>AMD APU, and can read/write main memory about 3 times faster than any
>APU. To me, thats as important to the over-all speed of a system, as
>the ability to crunch numbers. The celeron should be similar, but
>likely has smaller caches.

Hi,

I ordered Intel :).

A Gigabyte GA-B85M-D3H and an Intel Celeron Dual-Core G1840.

Regards,
Ralf


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Intel® HD Graphics - Was: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Fri, 17 Feb 2017 12:08:52 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

>On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 12:30:59 -0700, compdoc wrote:
>>That means if you want to spend less, get a celeron. I only use
>>Pentiums, which can read/write cpu caches many times faster than any
>>AMD APU, and can read/write main memory about 3 times faster than any
>>APU. To me, thats as important to the over-all speed of a system, as
>>the ability to crunch numbers. The celeron should be similar, but
>>likely has smaller caches.
>
>I ordered Intel :).
>
>A Gigabyte GA-B85M-D3H and an Intel Celeron Dual-Core G1840.

Hi,

if I use the new mobo with the default vertical frequency 60 Hz, e.g.
when booting an Ubuntu flavour live DVD or at the bootloader menu,
there's an annoying flashing line in the upper left corner of the CRT
monitor, what ever settings I'm using for the monitor, e.g. even if I
zoom in at max. The flashing isn't noticeable for 1152x864 at 90 Hz. I
still need to test if it's possible to select a higher vertical
frequency without an xorg.conf, but I doubt that xrandr will allow
other frequencies without xorg.conf.

I sometimes need an old Ubuntu Quantal and booting it does end with a
black screen. If I boot with "nomodeset" I don't get a black screen,
but then it suffers from the 60 Hz issue.

$ grep LABEL\ Light -A4 syslinux.cfg
LABEL Light
    MENU LABEL Ubuntu ^Q LightScribe Rt
    LINUX /.boot/ubuntu_q/boot/vmlinuz-3.6.5-rt14
    APPEND root=LABEL=q ro nomodeset
    INITRD /.boot/ubuntu_q/boot/initrd.img-3.6.5-rt14

Is this a known issue for Intel HD Graphics?

I've never experienced this before, when using NVIDIA and ATI graphics.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Intel® HD Graphics - Was: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

compdoc
On 02/22/2017 12:01 AM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

> there's an annoying flashing line in the upper left corner of the CRT
> monitor, what ever settings I'm using for the monitor, e.g. even if I
> zoom in at max. The flashing isn't noticeable for 1152x864 at 90 Hz. I

You still own a CRT? 1152x864 seems an odd rez for a crt, and I think we
always tried to use 72hz to 75hz for best picture.

60hz could be seen to strobe with fluorescent lighting, and settings
higher than 75hz can heat up the monitor. Ah, the good ole days...

Hope you get it figured out. Does the new system seem pretty fast?




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Re: Intel® HD Graphics - Was: Cheap mobo that doesn't cause issues with Ubuntu.

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Thu, 23 Feb 2017 09:51:23 -0700, compdoc wrote:

>On 02/22/2017 12:01 AM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>
>> there's an annoying flashing line in the upper left corner of the CRT
>> monitor, what ever settings I'm using for the monitor, e.g. even if I
>> zoom in at max. The flashing isn't noticeable for 1152x864 at 90 Hz.
>> I  
>
>You still own a CRT? 1152x864 seems an odd rez for a crt, and I think
>we always tried to use 72hz to 75hz for best picture.
>
>60hz could be seen to strobe with fluorescent lighting, and settings
>higher than 75hz can heat up the monitor. Ah, the good ole days...
>
>Hope you get it figured out. Does the new system seem pretty fast?

Sometimes there's no choice. The bootloader menu, memtest and live
media, as well as some vintage installs only allow 60 Hz or 70 Hz and
resolutions smaller than 1152x864. More annoying than the stroboscope
effect caused by 60 Hz or 70 Hz is the f...ine flashing Intel HD
Graphics line. Some tasks are faster than for my old mobo, e.g.
compiling a kernel, backups to tar.gz. The hardware allows lowest
latency settings with my professional audio interface as well as with
at least one of my pro-sumer audio interfaces.


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