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Clonezilla question

Phil
Thank you for reading this.

The current thread dealing with restoring backups has rekindled my
interest in Clonezilla.

I would like to replace my laptop's SDD with a larger one. I had the
idea that I could simply clone the entire disk drive which includes a
Windows and Linux partitions. I need Windows so that I can update my
Garman navigator maps form time to time otherwise I'd simply install
Linux and copy my backup files over to the new drive.

I discovered that Clonezilla requires that the source drive be unmounted
and since I only have one functioning computer I cannot see how I can
proceed. The plan was to connect the destination drive to a USB SATA cable.

So, how can I clone my laptop's SSD without a second computer?

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Re: Clonezilla question

compdoc
On 12/09/2017 03:56 PM, Phil wrote:

> I discovered that Clonezilla requires that the source drive be unmounted

I boot clonezilla from a cd or usb stick, and never have to worry about
drives in use. How are you running it?

Is it asking to unmount the swap partition?

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Re: Clonezilla question

Phil
On 10/12/17 13:26, compdoc wrote:
> On 12/09/2017 03:56 PM, Phil wrote:
>
>> I discovered that Clonezilla requires that the source drive be unmounted
>
> I boot clonezilla from a cd or usb stick, and never have to worry about
> drives in use. How are you running it?
>
> Is it asking to unmount the swap partition?

Thank you comdoc for your reply.

The Clonezilla site mentions the need to unmount the drive that needs to
be cloned. I suppose booting from a DVD overcomes that need. I'll
download it anyway and see if I can clone onto an old mechanical disk as
a test before splashing out on a new SSD.

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Xen
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Re: Clonezilla question

Xen
In reply to this post by Phil
Phil schreef op 09-12-2017 23:56:

> So, how can I clone my laptop's SSD without a second computer?

You can do so from a live run of any Ubuntu DVD.

CloneZilla also allows one to create a restoration DVD but this implies
that you already have made a backup and it is probably also a bit silly
in that the entire backup has to sit on those (multiple) DVDs.

The only real way to create a backup of your main system while that
system is running, is using snapshots.

(E.g. you would need to reserve some 10GB of snapshot space on your
drive while at the same time using LVM as your partitioning tool).

So you must always reboot into a live session and then you can access
your drives without issue.

(The above limitation does not imply if you are not making backups of
the complete system; ie. you can make backups of data at any time, but
these would be file-level backups and not images).

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Re: Clonezilla question

Phil
On 10/12/17 16:58, Xen wrote:
> Phil schreef op 09-12-2017 23:56:
>
>> So, how can I clone my laptop's SSD without a second computer?
>
> You can do so from a live run of any Ubuntu DVD.

That sounds like an interesting idea; I'll give it some thought.

I don't need a backup, just some way of cloning what I have onto another
SSD. Windows is the main problem because I don't have an installation disk.

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Re: Clonezilla question

Colin Law
In reply to this post by Phil
On 10 December 2017 at 05:03, Phil <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 10/12/17 13:26, compdoc wrote:
On 12/09/2017 03:56 PM, Phil wrote:

I discovered that Clonezilla requires that the source drive be unmounted

I boot clonezilla from a cd or usb stick, and never have to worry about drives in use. How are you running it?

Is it asking to unmount the swap partition?

Thank you comdoc for your reply.

The Clonezilla site mentions the need to unmount the drive that needs to be cloned. I suppose booting from a DVD overcomes that need. I'll download it anyway and see if I can clone onto an old mechanical disk as a test before splashing out on a new SSD.

Unless you can plug in both SSD drives at the same time that is how you will need to do it anyway.  Boot from live DVD and run clonezilla to clone the old disc to the HDD. Then plug in the new disc, boot from DVD again and use clonezilla to restore it to the new SSD. Then after checking it all works you can use gparted (again booted from live DVD) to move and extend the partitions to fill the disc.

Clonezilla is not the easiest of tools to navigate around, so make notes of what you do the first time, so when you come to do it again for the real thing you won't suffer as much brain strain.

Coincidentally I have just added a larger SSD to my Xmas wish list so hopefully will be going through the same process.

Colin


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Re: Clonezilla question

Xen
In reply to this post by Phil
Phil schreef op 10-12-2017 9:51:

> On 10/12/17 16:58, Xen wrote:
>> Phil schreef op 09-12-2017 23:56:
>>
>>> So, how can I clone my laptop's SSD without a second computer?
>>
>> You can do so from a live run of any Ubuntu DVD.
>
> That sounds like an interesting idea; I'll give it some thought.
>
> I don't need a backup, just some way of cloning what I have onto
> another SSD. Windows is the main problem because I don't have an
> installation disk.

I'm not 100% certain CloneZilla works flawlessly with Windows.

By all means, ensure that when you clone Windows, Windows has shut down
completely first.

Do not backup a "quickboot" 'opened' Windows partition and do not try to
use ntfsfix to do it regardless. That is all I can say.

I should really contact the CloneZilla people about this but I have
restored a Windows system and subsequently it failed to persistently (or
consistently) boot.

Maybe ntfsfix does work, but I can't remember.

So if you do, please ensure you can boot Windows after the "clone" and
also ensure you can boot it at least 20 times ;-).

Also,

if you clone any LVM physical volumes using Ubuntu 16.04 directly onto
another disk in the same system (without using an image, and hence with
both disks connected at the same time) be *very* careful not to activate
any volume groups, and/or not to run any LVM command while both disks
are connected (after the clone).

16.10 fixes this, but in 16.04 it is ... tragic.

Windows also may not "like" having 2 disks connected that have the same
partitions. Always remember to disconnect the clone before rebooting, or
shutdown ASAP (hard) when you accidentally do boot.

Cloning disks is risky stuff if you do it directly.

It is not necessary to use CloneZilla; it just speeds things up.

You can also just "dd" the entire disk, but the same precautions apply.

Personally given my bad experience with CloneZilla I would DD my Windows
partitions and spend the extra time.

CloneZilla is just an assortment of scripts with a bad GUI that in the
end use "partclone".

Partclone is probably rock-solid but I just don't know what CloneZilla
might or might not do wrong.

Maybe other people have a different experience but I lost my Windows
system this way.

There is no benefit to using CloneZilla (or partclone) if it was not for
the time-savings.

I mean it just speeds up the process immensely.

This is all I can say: be warned :p.

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Re: Clonezilla question

Rolf Grunsky
On 2017-12-10 06:33 AM, Xen wrote:

> Phil schreef op 10-12-2017 9:51:
>> On 10/12/17 16:58, Xen wrote:
>>> Phil schreef op 09-12-2017 23:56:
>>>
>>>> So, how can I clone my laptop's SSD without a second computer?
>>>
>>> You can do so from a live run of any Ubuntu DVD.
>>
>> That sounds like an interesting idea; I'll give it some thought.
>>
>> I don't need a backup, just some way of cloning what I have onto
>> another SSD. Windows is the main problem because I don't have an
>> installation disk.
>
> I'm not 100% certain CloneZilla works flawlessly with Windows.
>
> By all means, ensure that when you clone Windows, Windows has shut down
> completely first.
>
> Do not backup a "quickboot" 'opened' Windows partition and do not try to
> use ntfsfix to do it regardless. That is all I can say.
>
> I should really contact the CloneZilla people about this but I have
> restored a Windows system and subsequently it failed to persistently (or
> consistently) boot.
>
> Maybe ntfsfix does work, but I can't remember.
>
> So if you do, please ensure you can boot Windows after the "clone" and
> also ensure you can boot it at least 20 times ;-).
>
> Also,
>
> if you clone any LVM physical volumes using Ubuntu 16.04 directly onto
> another disk in the same system (without using an image, and hence with
> both disks connected at the same time) be *very* careful not to activate
> any volume groups, and/or not to run any LVM command while both disks
> are connected (after the clone).
>
> 16.10 fixes this, but in 16.04 it is ... tragic.
>
> Windows also may not "like" having 2 disks connected that have the same
> partitions. Always remember to disconnect the clone before rebooting, or
> shutdown ASAP (hard) when you accidentally do boot.
>
> Cloning disks is risky stuff if you do it directly.
>
> It is not necessary to use CloneZilla; it just speeds things up.
>
> You can also just "dd" the entire disk, but the same precautions apply.
>
> Personally given my bad experience with CloneZilla I would DD my Windows
> partitions and spend the extra time.
>
> CloneZilla is just an assortment of scripts with a bad GUI that in the
> end use "partclone".
>
> Partclone is probably rock-solid but I just don't know what CloneZilla
> might or might not do wrong.
>
> Maybe other people have a different experience but I lost my Windows
> system this way.
>
> There is no benefit to using CloneZilla (or partclone) if it was not for
> the time-savings.
>
> I mean it just speeds up the process immensely.
>
> This is all I can say: be warned :p.
>
Clonezilla works with Windows. Or at least is does with Windows 7.

I have a Dell Optiplex 790 that came with Windows 7 installed on a 250Gb
drive. I created an image with Clonezilla and then restored the image to
a new 2Tb drive. I then expanded the image to fill the new drive with
gpartd. Worked perfectly!

The image is about 11Gb which I can backup on a BluRay disc. This is a
backup that I can always use to restore the drive to its original state.


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Re: Clonezilla question

compdoc
In reply to this post by Colin Law
On 12/10/2017 02:50 AM, Colin Law wrote:

Boot from live DVD and run clonezilla to clone the old disc to the HDD.


old disk to the new disk is the fastest way, but you can also have clonezilla copy to a file share/nas on the lan. then you reverse the process to copy to your new drive.

of course, afterward you'll need to boot gparted and expand your main partition, . Might have to delete and recreate the swap partition.

if you use Expert mode in clonezilla, there are options that allow it to do some of that automatically, but I always do it manually for best results.

Works great with windows, but if the target drive is a little too small, you have to take steps and shrink window's main partition first.

To make this process easy, I stopped using LVM long ago and I have the installer automatically create using the whole disk.

that usually ends up as:  boot part & main part & swap. For that reason, to this day I dont know how to use LVM.
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Re: Clonezilla question

Joel Rees
In reply to this post by Xen

> [...]
> (The above limitation does not imply if you are not making backups of the complete system; ie. you can make backups of data at any time, but these would be file-level backups and not images).
>

Even data files, you need to be sure nothing has write access during backup. You should be sure the applications that access the files are shut down while you perform backup.

Unless you use some sort of (preferably application level) snapshot or backup function.


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