Custom .XCompose

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Xen
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Custom .XCompose

Xen
So apparently there is a guy who has tried to mimic the Windows
behaviour as closely as possible.



https://github.com/raelgc/win_us_intl



There is a .XCompose you can download that will (or should) fix all of
those dead accent issues with 'n and 'r.

It's just that it doesn't work for me and my .XCompose is not even read
by the system.


So first question:



How do you get the .XCompose read by the system, using either:


- fcitx
- xim
- uim

as input method?

Does /usr/share/X11/locale/en_US.UTF-8/Compose even get read by the
system? I don't know...

Last access an hour ago. It is clearly not getting read...

My LANG is en_US.UTF-8 and LC_CTYPE is the same....

What woodwork do I find myself into this time...

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Tom H-4
On Sat, Nov 11, 2017 at 4:32 AM, Xen <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> So apparently there is a guy who has tried to mimic the Windows behaviour as
> closely as possible.
>
> https://github.com/raelgc/win_us_intl
>
> There is a .XCompose you can download that will (or should) fix all of those
> dead accent issues with 'n and 'r.
>
> It's just that it doesn't work for me and my .XCompose is not even read by
> the system.
>
> So first question:
>
> How do you get the .XCompose read by the system, using either:
>
> - fcitx
> - xim
> - uim
>
> as input method?
>
> Does /usr/share/X11/locale/en_US.UTF-8/Compose even get read by the system?
> I don't know...
>
> Last access an hour ago. It is clearly not getting read...
>
> My LANG is en_US.UTF-8 and LC_CTYPE is the same....
>
> What woodwork do I find myself into this time...

You can trace the opening of a terminal and you'll see (as I just did)
that ".XCompose" is loaded.

Check that you have set a compose key either within your DE or with "xmodmap".

Run

xmodmap -pk | grep Multi_key
or
xmodmap -pke | grep Multi_key

to display the key represented by the compose key.

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Xen
Tom H schreef op 11-11-2017 14:54:

> You can trace the opening of a terminal and you'll see (as I just did)
> that ".XCompose" is loaded.
>
> Check that you have set a compose key either within your DE or with
> "xmodmap".
>
> Run
>
> xmodmap -pk | grep Multi_key
> or
> xmodmap -pke | grep Multi_key
>
> to display the key represented by the compose key.

You're right, thanks it does get read.

Not sure why the access time wasn't updated (relatime should do that I
think).

The author of the .XCompose file responded and said that he verified
that it doesn't work under KDE 5.

Regards.

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Bob
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Re: Custom .XCompose

Bob
In reply to this post by Tom H-4
** Reply to message from Tom H <[hidden email]> on Sat, 11 Nov 2017
08:54:39 -0500

<snip>

> Check that you have set a compose key either within your DE or with "xmodmap".
>
> Run
>
> xmodmap -pk | grep Multi_key
> or
> xmodmap -pke | grep Multi_key
>
> to display the key represented by the compose key.

Being a novice Linux user I did not know there was a compose key.

I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally and have
been using the Alt-nnn method, using a compose key seems much easier.  I looked
at the xmodmap man page and the -help but could not figure out how to use it to
add the compose key, too many things not defined.

So could some kind person give the xmodmap command to add the compose key to
the capslock key?

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:53:52 -0800, Bob wrote:
>I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally
>and have been using the Alt-nnn method

What is the "Alt-nnn method"? I suspect you mean "Shift+Ctrl+U n..."?


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Re: Custom .XCompose

Xen
In reply to this post by Bob
Bob schreef op 11-11-2017 19:53:

> I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally and
> have
> been using the Alt-nnn method, using a compose key seems much easier.  
> I looked
> at the xmodmap man page and the -help but could not figure out how to
> use it to
> add the compose key, too many things not defined.
>
> So could some kind person give the xmodmap command to add the compose
> key to
> the capslock key?

You should be able to do it within Unity/Gnome/KDE.

In KDE it is where you do the keyboard setup on the "advanced" tab,
there is a list where you can pick a compose key.

The same should be possible in Unity and Gnome.

Initially I put mine on right ctrl, but then right ctrl didn't work
anymore, so I stepped away from that :p.

So now I have it on

right alt.

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Duane Whitty
In reply to this post by Ralf Mardorf-2


On 17-11-11 03:11 PM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
> On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:53:52 -0800, Bob wrote:
>> I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally
>> and have been using the Alt-nnn method
>
> What is the "Alt-nnn method"? I suspect you mean "Shift+Ctrl+U n..."?
>
>
I think he means he means that using the number keypad on a keyboard
(can't get it to work on my laptop) he would enter the character code
for a particular character like Alt+233. I think that gives "e accute"
in Latin-8 character set but not sure.

Best Regards,
Duane

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 15:27:02 -0400, Duane Whitty wrote:

>On 17-11-11 03:11 PM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>> On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:53:52 -0800, Bob wrote:  
>>> I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally
>>> and have been using the Alt-nnn method  
>>
>> What is the "Alt-nnn method"? I suspect you mean "Shift+Ctrl+U n..."?
>>
>>  
>I think he means he means that using the number keypad on a keyboard
>(can't get it to work on my laptop) he would enter the character code
>for a particular character like Alt+233. I think that gives "e accute"
>in Latin-8 character set but not sure.

é is pushing Shift+Ctrl+U and then typing e9 followed by a space or
return/enter.
hex e9 is decimal 233

Regarding https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89#Key_strokes Alt+n...
seemingly is a Windows thingy.

The Wiki doesn't mention Linux, however, for Linux use Shift+Ctrl+U and
after that type the hex unicode.


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Re: Custom .XCompose

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 20:59:22 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

>On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 15:27:02 -0400, Duane Whitty wrote:
>>On 17-11-11 03:11 PM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:  
>>> On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:53:52 -0800, Bob wrote:    
>>>> I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally
>>>> and have been using the Alt-nnn method    
>>>
>>> What is the "Alt-nnn method"? I suspect you mean "Shift+Ctrl+U
>>> n..."?
>>>
>>>    
>>I think he means he means that using the number keypad on a keyboard
>>(can't get it to work on my laptop) he would enter the character code
>>for a particular character like Alt+233. I think that gives "e accute"
>>in Latin-8 character set but not sure.  
>
>é is pushing Shift+Ctrl+U and then typing e9 followed by a space or
>return/enter.
>hex e9 is decimal 233
>
>Regarding https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89#Key_strokes Alt+n...
>seemingly is a Windows thingy.
>
>The Wiki doesn't mention Linux, however, for Linux use Shift+Ctrl+U and
>after that type the hex unicode.

Or on e.g. a German keyboard...

$ cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/keyboard.conf
Section "InputClass"
       Identifier "keyboard"
       MatchIsKeyboard "yes"
       Option "XkbLayout" "de"
       #Option "XkbVariant" "nodeadkeys"
EndSection

...it is first pushing ´ and then pressing e.


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Re: Custom .XCompose

Doug McGarrett

On 11/11/2017 03:09 PM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

> On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 20:59:22 +0100, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>> On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 15:27:02 -0400, Duane Whitty wrote:
>>> On 17-11-11 03:11 PM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>>>> On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:53:52 -0800, Bob wrote:
>>>>> I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally
>>>>> and have been using the Alt-nnn method
>>>> What is the "Alt-nnn method"? I suspect you mean "Shift+Ctrl+U
>>>> n..."?
>>>>
>>>>
I think everybody is missing the point. When you create a Compose
key--usually right alt--
you can then generate all the European modified letters, like ä, Ä. ö Ü
ß ñ ø µ ç é and so on,
by hitting the Compose key and then two symbols, like " and a, / and u,
and ~ and n, and
some fractions, like ½. ⅓  ¼  ⅚ and so on, and currency symbols, like £
and ¢ and ¥ .
There are quite few others, some obvious, some not. It's more clumsy
than having, say,
a German keyboard, but if you just need one of these every once in a
while, it's great,
and you don't have to memorize numerical codes for the symbols, since
most are
intuitive. (The fractions a alt 1 2 etc. the ß is alt s s )

--doug



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Re: Custom .XCompose

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 15:29:01 -0500, Doug wrote:
>I think everybody is missing the point. When you create a Compose
>key

We didn't miss this, but apart from using a compose key, some users
expect Alt+a_number_typed_on_the_numpad to generate a sign, actually
GTK apps provide Shit+Ctrl+U. I don't know what is provided for Qt
apps, perhaps Google could answer it.


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Re: Custom .XCompose

Bob
In reply to this post by Ralf Mardorf-2
** Reply to message from Ralf Mardorf <[hidden email]> on Sat, 11 Nov
2017 20:11:21 +0100

> On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:53:52 -0800, Bob wrote:
> >I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally
> >and have been using the Alt-nnn method
>
> What is the "Alt-nnn method"? I suspect you mean "Shift+Ctrl+U n..."?

Press the Alt key and enter three numbers on the numeric key pad and then
release the Alt key.

 Å Alt-143
 å Alt-134
 Ä Alt-142
 ä Alt-132
 Ö Alt-153
 ö Alt-148

Ubuntu is not my primary OS yet, it is OS/2.  This works using Windows and
OS/2.  I just tried that on Ubuntu and it does not seem to work.  All the more
reason to get a compose key configured.

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Bob
In reply to this post by Xen
** Reply to message from Xen <[hidden email]> on Sat, 11 Nov 2017 20:21:22
+0100

> Bob schreef op 11-11-2017 19:53:
>
> > I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally and
> > have
> > been using the Alt-nnn method, using a compose key seems much easier.  
> > I looked
> > at the xmodmap man page and the -help but could not figure out how to
> > use it to
> > add the compose key, too many things not defined.
> >
> > So could some kind person give the xmodmap command to add the compose
> > key to
> > the capslock key?
>
> You should be able to do it within Unity/Gnome/KDE.

I think you have me confused with someone else that knows Ubuntu, it is not yet
my primary OS.  I do know I was using Unity and the last upgrade that changed
to Gnome but I do not know what KDE is.


> In KDE it is where you do the keyboard setup on the "advanced" tab,
> there is a list where you can pick a compose key.
>
> The same should be possible in Unity and Gnome.
>
> Initially I put mine on right ctrl, but then right ctrl didn't work
> anymore, so I stepped away from that :p.
>
> So now I have it on
>
> right alt.

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When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work, because the other half is going to take care of them, and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work, because somebody else is going to get what they work for, that is the beginning of the end of any nation! -- Adrian Rogers

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Bob
In reply to this post by Duane Whitty
** Reply to message from Duane Whitty <[hidden email]> on Sat, 11 Nov 2017
15:27:02 -0400

> On 17-11-11 03:11 PM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
> > On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 10:53:52 -0800, Bob wrote:
> >> I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally
> >> and have been using the Alt-nnn method
> >
> > What is the "Alt-nnn method"? I suspect you mean "Shift+Ctrl+U n..."?
> >
> >
> I think he means he means that using the number keypad on a keyboard
> (can't get it to work on my laptop) he would enter the character code
> for a particular character like Alt+233. I think that gives "e accute"
> in Latin-8 character set but not sure.

It is a bit of a pain to use on a laptop that does not have a separate numeric
keypad.  You need to turn on NumLock.  On my laptop it makes the keys under the
7, 8, and 9 keys the numeric keypad.  You have to turn on NumLock press Alt
then enter the numbers release the Alt then turn off NumLock to continue
normally.  But as I mentioned in another post it does not seem to work using
Ubuntu.

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 22:39:24 -0800, Bob wrote:
>It is a bit of a pain to use on a laptop that does not have a separate
>numeric keypad.  You need to turn on NumLock.  On my laptop it makes
>the keys under the 7, 8, and 9 keys the numeric keypad.  You have to
>turn on NumLock press Alt then enter the numbers release the Alt then
>turn off NumLock to continue normally.  But as I mentioned in another
>post it does not seem to work using Ubuntu.

Hi,

if the environment you are using with Linux shouldn't provide an option
to enable the numpad automatically, you could autostart  numlockx  from
the package named  numlockx  . How to autostart it, depends on the
used window manager or desktop environment.

As already explained, at least by default

  Alt+a_number_typed_on_the_numpad

doesn't work when using Linux.

Alternatively GTK applications provide

  Shift+Ctrl+U

an then typing a hex (not decimal) number with or without using the
numpad. Not all applications are based upon GTK, so this at least by
default, doesn't work for all applications.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Custom .XCompose

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by Bob
On Sat, 11 Nov 2017 22:39:24 -0800, Bob wrote:
>then turn off NumLock to continue normally

PS: So automatically enabling Num Lock wouldn't help. However, it anyway
is irrelevant, since Shift+Ctrl+U doesn't require to use the numpad.


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Re: Custom .XCompose

Karl Auer
In reply to this post by Bob
On Sat, 2017-11-11 at 22:39 -0800, Bob wrote:
> It is a bit of a pain to use on a laptop that does not have a
> separate numeric keypad.  You need to turn on NumLock.
> [...]
> But as I mentioned in anather post it does not seem to
> work using Ubuntu.

I use German a fair bit and have these notes on making some German
special characters:

1: Use the "Settings" tool, select "Text Entry" then "Keyboard options"
(it's a link at bottom right).

2: Click "Disabled" on the "Compose key" line. A list of possible
compose keys will drop down. Choose e.g. "Right Alt" - most of the
others are taken by something else. Then close the "Settings" applet.

3: To enter an Umlaut, press the compose key (that you chose in step
2), then double-quote, then the unmodified letter. For example, tap, in
order rightAlt, double-quote, "a" to get "ä" (Umlaut-a). For the
capitalised version, just type the capital letter instead.

4: For a sharp-S, use compose, s, "s" or compose, S, "S".

I only use Umlauts and sharp-S, but this link looks very useful for a
bunch of other special characters in various other languages as well.
And it definitely works at least for "å" and "Å" :-)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compose_key#Common_compose_combinations

I've found that typing special characters this way becomes quite fast
with very little practice.
Regards, K.

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http://twitter.com/kauer389

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Xen
In reply to this post by Bob
Bob schreef op 12-11-2017 7:27:

> ** Reply to message from Xen <[hidden email]> on Sat, 11 Nov 2017
> 20:21:22
> +0100
>
>> Bob schreef op 11-11-2017 19:53:
>>
>> > I have the need to input the extra Swedish characters occassionally and
>> > have
>> > been using the Alt-nnn method, using a compose key seems much easier.
>> > I looked
>> > at the xmodmap man page and the -help but could not figure out how to
>> > use it to
>> > add the compose key, too many things not defined.
>> >
>> > So could some kind person give the xmodmap command to add the compose
>> > key to
>> > the capslock key?
>>
>> You should be able to do it within Unity/Gnome/KDE.
>
> I think you have me confused with someone else that knows Ubuntu, it is
> not yet
> my primary OS.  I do know I was using Unity and the last upgrade that
> changed
> to Gnome but I do not know what KDE is.

Unity is the thing you get if you install Ubuntu 16.04

It is based on Gnome 3.

17.10 changed to Gnome 3.

It was possible to use a special flavour of Ubuntu called "Ubuntu Gnome"
that already used Gnome 3.

Starting from 17.10, this ceases to exist.

There is another flavour of Ubuntu called Kubuntu.



It uses another desktop called "KDE" which really just means "K Desktop
Environment".

KDE is based on a different toolset.

The graphical Linux world has always had two: GTK and Qt.

Both Ubuntu Unity and Gnome 3 (and Gnome 2) were based on GTK.



So Ubuntu was already very close to Gnome 3 which is why they are able
to make the move with not much effort.

The last Long Term Support release with Unity is 16.04.




Since you will only be using GTK, you can follow Karl's instructions in
his email to set up a compose key in Unity.

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Colin Law
On 12 November 2017 at 08:24, Xen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>...
> Unity is the thing you get if you install Ubuntu 16.04
>
> It is based on Gnome 3.
>
> 17.10 changed to Gnome 3.
>

Would that be better worded as '17.10 changed to Gnome Shell (based on
Gnome 3)'?

Colin

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Re: Custom .XCompose

Xen
Colin Law schreef op 12-11-2017 9:36:

> On 12 November 2017 at 08:24, Xen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> ...
>> Unity is the thing you get if you install Ubuntu 16.04
>>
>> It is based on Gnome 3.
>>
>> 17.10 changed to Gnome 3.
>>
>
> Would that be better worded as '17.10 changed to Gnome Shell (based on
> Gnome 3)'?

The official release notes state:

The Ubuntu Desktop now uses GNOME instead of Unity.

I don't know what the difference is. I think it is nitpicking to make
something sound more important ;-).

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