Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
12 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

rikona
It's upgrade time, from 16.04... Considering putting a new install of
Kubuntu on a new M2 PCIe disk to improve performance a bit [same old
box otherwise]. Would this be a normal UEFI large-disk install, as on a
hard disk, or is there more to it? Any problems, issues, etc? Any
interaction specific to just Kubuntu with a new M2 PCIe disk, or does
the desktop not make any difference? Anyone actually done this? Hoping
for just a plain vanilla install, but saw several adverse online
comments re Ubuntu on M2 PCIes...


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

Oliver Grawert
hi,
Am Mittwoch, den 28.10.2020, 21:52 -0700 schrieb rikona:

> It's upgrade time, from 16.04... Considering putting a new install of
> Kubuntu on a new M2 PCIe disk to improve performance a bit [same old
> box otherwise]. Would this be a normal UEFI large-disk install, as on
> a
> hard disk, or is there more to it? Any problems, issues, etc? Any
> interaction specific to just Kubuntu with a new M2 PCIe disk, or does
> the desktop not make any difference? Anyone actually done this?
> Hoping
> for just a plain vanilla install, but saw several adverse online
> comments re Ubuntu on M2 PCIes...
>
the difference should be solely on the kernel (and BIOS) level, an M2
disk is just a disk from user space POV, nothing special as long as
your BIOS/UEFI can see it for booting ...

ciao
        oli
--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

signature.asc (188 bytes) Download Attachment
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

Chris Green
In reply to this post by rikona
On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 09:52:49PM -0700, rikona wrote:
> It's upgrade time, from 16.04... Considering putting a new install of
> Kubuntu on a new M2 PCIe disk to improve performance a bit [same old
> box otherwise]. Would this be a normal UEFI large-disk install, as on a
> hard disk, or is there more to it? Any problems, issues, etc? Any
> interaction specific to just Kubuntu with a new M2 PCIe disk, or does
> the desktop not make any difference? Anyone actually done this? Hoping
> for just a plain vanilla install, but saw several adverse online
> comments re Ubuntu on M2 PCIes...
>
I added a PCIe disk to my desktop system recently and installed 20.04
on it.  Once I was through the issues of getting the PCIe disk visible
to the OS at boot time there was no problem at all getting Linux
installed on it.

I did have quite a few conversations with the very helpful denizens of
the [hidden email] mailing list getting the boot side of things
sorted.

--
Chris Green

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

Chris Green
On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 09:24:25AM +0000, Chris Green wrote:

> On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 09:52:49PM -0700, rikona wrote:
> > It's upgrade time, from 16.04... Considering putting a new install of
> > Kubuntu on a new M2 PCIe disk to improve performance a bit [same old
> > box otherwise]. Would this be a normal UEFI large-disk install, as on a
> > hard disk, or is there more to it? Any problems, issues, etc? Any
> > interaction specific to just Kubuntu with a new M2 PCIe disk, or does
> > the desktop not make any difference? Anyone actually done this? Hoping
> > for just a plain vanilla install, but saw several adverse online
> > comments re Ubuntu on M2 PCIes...
> >
> I added a PCIe disk to my desktop system recently and installed 20.04
> on it.  Once I was through the issues of getting the PCIe disk visible
> to the OS at boot time there was no problem at all getting Linux
> installed on it.
>
> I did have quite a few conversations with the very helpful denizens of
> the [hidden email] mailing list getting the boot side of things
> sorted.
>
Ah, it's coming back to me now!

The major issue I had was that the PCIe disk *wasn't* recognised by
the BIOS so I had to configure things so that the system still booted
of (one of) the SATA disks but the new OS was installed on the PCIe
disk.

--
Chris Green

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

rikona
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 09:29:44 +0000
Chris Green <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 09:24:25AM +0000, Chris Green wrote:
> > On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 09:52:49PM -0700, rikona wrote:  
> > > It's upgrade time, from 16.04... Considering putting a new
> > > install of Kubuntu on a new M2 PCIe disk to improve performance a
> > > bit [same old box otherwise]. Would this be a normal UEFI
> > > large-disk install, as on a hard disk, or is there more to it?
> > > Any problems, issues, etc? Any interaction specific to just
> > > Kubuntu with a new M2 PCIe disk, or does the desktop not make any
> > > difference? Anyone actually done this? Hoping for just a plain
> > > vanilla install, but saw several adverse online comments re
> > > Ubuntu on M2 PCIes...
> > I added a PCIe disk to my desktop system recently and installed
> > 20.04 on it.  Once I was through the issues of getting the PCIe
> > disk visible to the OS at boot time there was no problem at all
> > getting Linux installed on it.
> >
> > I did have quite a few conversations with the very helpful denizens
> > of the [hidden email] mailing list getting the boot side of
> > things sorted.
> >  
> Ah, it's coming back to me now!
>
> The major issue I had was that the PCIe disk *wasn't* recognised by
> the BIOS so I had to configure things so that the system still booted
> of (one of) the SATA disks but the new OS was installed on the PCIe
> disk.

Thanks to you and Oliver for pointing to where the problems are likely
to be - in the BIOS. This seems to be consistent with a number of
things I saw online - "Dell doesn't support that" or "WD doesn't
support that", but not describing exactly what the problem was. This
does not sound like it's going to be a vanilla install. :-((

I have another thought: one of the main reasons I want to improve
performance is to speed up searching. I have a few Tb of data, and use
a recoll indexed search to find things on my box. Given the amount of
data, though, the index is VERY large, and a complex search can take
2-3 minutes to complete. I use this search quite a bit and would like
to reduce the time.

A possible alternate solution might be to install Kubuntu on a hard
disk, which I assume is just a vanilla install, and set up the recoll
index files on the PCIe drive. That might let recoll go through the
very large index files much faster and speed up the result. The box is
adequately fast for other tasks, so this might be a possible
alternative. Does this sound like a good approach, or am I missing
something?

But, I would still need to have the M2 drive recognized after booting
and running from the hard disk. Are the mods still needed to get the M2
drive recognized *at all*, even after you boot up from a hard disk, and
run the OS on the hard drive?



--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

Chris Green
On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:40:42AM -0700, rikona wrote:
>
> But, I would still need to have the M2 drive recognized after booting
> and running from the hard disk. Are the mods still needed to get the M2
> drive recognized *at all*, even after you boot up from a hard disk, and
> run the OS on the hard drive?
>
My experience was that Linux (xubuntu 20.04 in my case) recognised the
PCIe drive without problems so if you just add the drive and put
things on it that need the speed you should be fine.

--
Chris Green

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by rikona
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 at 05:55, rikona <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> It's upgrade time, from 16.04... Considering putting a new install of
> Kubuntu on a new M2 PCIe disk to improve performance a bit [same old
> box otherwise]. Would this be a normal UEFI large-disk install, as on a
> hard disk, or is there more to it? Any problems, issues, etc?

The most important information here is something you do not give:

On what make/model of computer?

Does it have an M2 interface?

If yes, and your firmware is current, it should be no problem.

If no, then it could be tricky and I'd suggest a SATA SSD instead.


--
Liam Proven – Profile: https://about.me/liamproven
Email: [hidden email] – gMail/gTalk/gHangouts: [hidden email]
Twitter/Facebook/LinkedIn/Flickr: lproven – Skype: liamproven
UK: +44 7939-087884 – ČR (+ WhatsApp/Telegram/Signal): +420 702 829 053

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

rikona
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 21:42:48 +0100
Liam Proven <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 at 05:55, rikona <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > It's upgrade time, from 16.04... Considering putting a new install
> > of Kubuntu on a new M2 PCIe disk to improve performance a bit [same
> > old box otherwise]. Would this be a normal UEFI large-disk install,
> > as on a hard disk, or is there more to it? Any problems, issues,
> > etc?  
>
> The most important information here is something you do not give:
>
> On what make/model of computer?

Home built; has an ASUS 970_PRO_GAMING_AURA MoBo; AMD proc.

> Does it have an M2 interface?

Yes - PCIe, but the manual doesn't say which one. I'm assuming 3 since a
bit old...

> If yes, and your firmware is current, it should be no problem.

OK - thanks - sounds good

> If no, then it could be tricky and I'd suggest a SATA SSD instead.

That's what I was thinking originally but (1) I noticed that M2 PCIe has
a much faster interface speed than SATA, but (2) there seemed to be many
problems with M2s so thought I'd better ask.

Will try the HD boot/run + large database on the M2.

Thanks.

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

rikona
In reply to this post by Chris Green
On Thu, 29 Oct 2020 19:53:15 +0000
Chris Green <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:40:42AM -0700, rikona wrote:
> >
> > But, I would still need to have the M2 drive recognized after
> > booting and running from the hard disk. Are the mods still needed
> > to get the M2 drive recognized *at all*, even after you boot up
> > from a hard disk, and run the OS on the hard drive?
> >  
> My experience was that Linux (xubuntu 20.04 in my case) recognised the
> PCIe drive without problems so if you just add the drive and put
> things on it that need the speed you should be fine.

OK - thanks much. Wish me luck. :-))



--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by rikona
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 at 00:59, rikona <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Home built; has an ASUS 970_PRO_GAMING_AURA MoBo; AMD proc.

*Googles* -- OK.
>
> > Does it have an M2 interface?
>
> Yes - PCIe, but the manual doesn't say which one. I'm assuming 3 since a
> bit old...

Yes, looks like SATA SSDs will fit but not work:
https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/asus-970-pro-gaming-aura-not-recognizing-m-2-sandisk-x400.2647288/

> That's what I was thinking originally but (1) I noticed that M2 PCIe has
> a much faster interface speed than SATA, but (2) there seemed to be many
> problems with M2s so thought I'd better ask.

Compatibility is a minefield with these.

After I bought my Thinkpad X220, I found its WWAN card slot can
support an mSATA SSD, so I bought a used one cheap & now I have 2
drives in a small executive-type ultraportable. This is great.

I recently helped a friend buy a cheap big beast -- he wanted a 15.6"
screen. We found a decently-priced Thinkpad W510. Just one generation
older but its WWAN slot doesn't support SATA disks at all.

> Will try the HD boot/run + large database on the M2.

That seems a bit back-asswards, TBH.

SATA SSDs are cheap now. Even a small one is enough for a Linux root
partition: 64GB is plenty. I got a 120GB one free that is in my
girlfriend's MacBook Pro. I upgraded a friend's Core i3 Win10 laptop
with a 500GB SSD a couple of months ago, which cost about €50.

I'd say the ideal would be:
/ on SATA SSD
/home on hard disk
/nvme or /db or something additional like that for your NVMe drive.




>
> Thanks.
>
> --
> ubuntu-users mailing list
> [hidden email]
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users



--
Liam Proven – Profile: https://about.me/liamproven
Email: [hidden email] – gMail/gTalk/gHangouts: [hidden email]
Twitter/Facebook/LinkedIn/Flickr: lproven – Skype: liamproven
UK: +44 7939-087884 – ČR (+ WhatsApp/Telegram/Signal): +420 702 829 053

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

rikona
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 01:41:03 +0100
Liam Proven <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 at 00:59, rikona <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > Home built; has an ASUS 970_PRO_GAMING_AURA MoBo; AMD proc.  
>
> *Googles* -- OK.
> >  
> > > Does it have an M2 interface?  
> >
> > Yes - PCIe, but the manual doesn't say which one. I'm assuming 3
> > since a bit old...  
>
> Yes, looks like SATA SSDs will fit but not work:
> https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/asus-970-pro-gaming-aura-not-recognizing-m-2-sandisk-x400.2647288/

I think what they're mostly talking about is not being able to boot from
an M2 drive, which apparently needs a bunch of extra fiddling to make
that happen, and maybe not possible with some MoBos. If you boot up from
another kind of drive, the M2 may then be visible and usable as a drive.

But, I learned that my 970 board only supports PCIe 2 x4. I've heard
that some newer M2 boards may have backwards compatibility, but speed
will be limited by the MoBo specs. The new boards all advertise
fantastic transfer speeds, which is what attracted me to this option.
But, when I checked the numbers, I will only get about ** 1/15th ** of
the latest technology speed, which is actually not much better than
what I would get with a SATA 3 drive. So, even though it sounded great
at the beginning, this may not end up to be as good as I thought it
would be, and I might as well just use a SATA3 drive. Much easier, and
no fiddling. :-)

> > That's what I was thinking originally but (1) I noticed that M2
> > PCIe has a much faster interface speed than SATA, but (2) there
> > seemed to be many problems with M2s so thought I'd better ask.  
>
> Compatibility is a minefield with these.
>
> After I bought my Thinkpad X220, I found its WWAN card slot can
> support an mSATA SSD, so I bought a used one cheap & now I have 2
> drives in a small executive-type ultraportable. This is great.
>
> I recently helped a friend buy a cheap big beast -- he wanted a 15.6"
> screen. We found a decently-priced Thinkpad W510. Just one generation
> older but its WWAN slot doesn't support SATA disks at all.
>
> > Will try the HD boot/run + large database on the M2.  
>
> That seems a bit back-asswards, TBH.
>
> SATA SSDs are cheap now. Even a small one is enough for a Linux root
> partition: 64GB is plenty. I got a 120GB one free that is in my
> girlfriend's MacBook Pro. I upgraded a friend's Core i3 Win10 laptop
> with a 500GB SSD a couple of months ago, which cost about €50.
>
> I'd say the ideal would be:
> / on SATA SSD
> /home on hard disk

My apologies, I did not describe the plan accurately. This is actually
what I'm doing on 16.04. I mentioned HD just to differentiate from an
M2 boot up.

> /nvme or /db or something additional like that for your NVMe drive.

This looks like a good idea. Would it be better to format that new SATA
3 SSD [instead of M2 NVMe] with that mount point before assembling the
box, or just install/format later?

If I decide to break the bank :-)) and get a very large single SSD
instead of the above 3-drive solution, is there any disadvantage in
having everything on one drive [assuming I do frequent backups and/or
clones]?

Thanks, again...




--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Kubuntu on M2 PCIe disk?

ubuntu-users mailing list
On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 15:51:18 -0700, rikona wrote:
>If I decide to break the bank :-)) and get a very large single SSD
>instead of the above 3-drive solution, is there any disadvantage in
>having everything on one drive [assuming I do frequent backups and/or
>clones]?

If you own 3 drives and one drive breaks, you still have got 2 drives.
If you have just one drive ... ;).

I'm using 5 small build in SSDs, one attached by SATA 2, since I only
have got 4 SATA 3 ports. I don't have got enough SSD space inside of my
computer. So, if I could turn back time, or if I were you, I would buy
one large, instead of 3 small drives, since now I anyway need to
replace the small drives one by another. Externals HHDs are good tom
archive seldom needed data and for backups, but not comfortable for
much needed data. I don't want to have a build-in HDD anymore, since
they are way to noisy for my taste.

Keep in mind that a large SSD has got more space for self-organisation
which might result in better performance and a longer life. OTOH more
ports might provide more bandwidth. If a drive is trimming, it might be
slower and not all drives trim at the same time.

Consider to steer a middle course, neither buy 3 SSDs nor 1 SSD,
consider to get 2 SSDs.

FWIW I try to avoid using a PCIe SSD as long as possible. Apart from
the mentioned issues, it might interact negatively with my real-time
audio interfaces, it needs a PCIe slot I might need for other hardware.
All my SSDs are from OCZ/Toshiba, since they are cheap, in my
experiences very good and the vendor provides Linux software. Note,
smartctl's data base does not contain all SSDs, if your SSD is missing
and the vendor doesn't offer Linux software, you don't get any
useful information out of your SSD. OCZ/Toshiba provides ocz-ssd-utility
to update firmware and to get correct smart data, unfortunately they
announced to discontinue SATA SSDs. OCZ/Toshiba will provide PCIe SSDs
only in the future (if they shouldn't already do so).

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users