Out of Space

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Re: Out of Space

Richard Barmann


On 08/08/2016 04:05 PM, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

> On Mon, 8 Aug 2016 15:04:58 -0400, Barmann wrote:
>>> I was trying to install the Ubuntu 16.04 and diid the format that it
>>> called for in the begining of the install and now I have: Boot from
>>> CD : error: file '/boot/grub/i386-pc/normal.mod' not found. Entering
>>> resue  mode... grub rescue>
>> What did I or the burned CD do?
> That's strange, this shouldn't happen.
>
> Are you talking about the Ubuntu or Kubuntu ISO or about a GParted
> media?
>
> The Ubuntu/Kubuntu ISO don't fit on a CD, you need to burn a DVD.
>
> Regards,
> Ralf
>
>
> It was the Kubuntu DVD. I mispoke/typed.
Dick


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Re: Out of Space

Ralf Mardorf-2
Hi,

to avoid a mess we should separate your thread [1], from the thread
related to the issue experienced by Gene [2].

On Mon, 8 Aug 2016 23:45:35 -0400, Barmann wrote:
>> I can get past the Grub error and the Ubuntu and Kubntu will load
>> partway and then I will gt text errors ending with  
>(initramfs) Unable to find a medium containing a live file system

Unfortunately I can't help with issues caused by the install media.
Likely one of the Ubuntu developers subscribed to this list could help
you.

Regards,
Ralf

[1] Re: Out of Space
[2] Re: install ubuntu using something else method - Was: Out of Space


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Re: Out of Space

Oliver Grawert
In reply to this post by Gene Heskett-2
hi,
Am Montag, den 08.08.2016, 12:16 -0400 schrieb Gene Heskett:

> On Monday 08 August 2016 05:27:29 Colin Law wrote:
>
> >
> > On 8 August 2016 at 10:20, Gene Heskett <[hidden email]>
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > ...
> > > With todays installers, how can you make it use an already
> > > prepared,
> > > labeled and formatted disk? Thats a trick I have never seen done.
> > When asked where to install select "Something Else" then you can
> > choose what you want with each partition.  If you leave the Format
> > checkbox unticked it will not format that partition.
> But it still refuses to recognize a prepared disk, and you are still 
> forced to rewrite the parttition table, and may wind up with /boot
> being 
> 850 gigs into the terabyte disk, and out of reach of the machines
> bios 
> to reboot to at the end of the install.
wasnt that an issue with the BIOS.. it has been a while that i had to
use non UEFI BIOSes but iirc you could switch the HDD between CHS and
LBA mode since CHS is the summary of an equation of cylinders heads and
sectors, there is a limit which the last visible part of the disk can
be ... LBA (logical block addressing) will just see all of the disk and
just count blocks from the start to the end ... 

so check your BIOS settings for the HDD, perhaps it is that ...

ciao
        oli
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Re: Out of Space

Nils Kassube-2
Oliver Grawert wrote:

> Am Montag, den 08.08.2016, 12:16 -0400 schrieb Gene Heskett:
> > But it still refuses to recognize a prepared disk, and you are
> > still
> > forced to rewrite the parttition table, and may wind up with /boot
> > being
> > 850 gigs into the terabyte disk, and out of reach of the machines
> > bios
> > to reboot to at the end of the install.
>
> wasnt that an issue with the BIOS.. it has been a while that i had to
> use non UEFI BIOSes but iirc you could switch the HDD between CHS and
> LBA mode since CHS is the summary of an equation of cylinders heads
> and sectors, there is a limit which the last visible part of the disk
> can be ... LBA (logical block addressing) will just see all of the
> disk and just count blocks from the start to the end ...
>
> so check your BIOS settings for the HDD, perhaps it is that ...

I still don't understand how it could be relevant if GRUB runs from the
very first track of the disk. As I understand it, GRUB reads the file
system using its own code, not the BIOS. It could only be a problem if
GRUB is not installed to the MBR but to a partition. I'm not sure if
ubiquity would warn about this situation but I do remember that I have
seen a warning when using grub-install - and it would only proceed with
an extra force option.


Nils


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Re: Out of Space

Oliver Grawert
hi,
On Di, 2016-08-09 at 14:04 +0200, Nils Kassube wrote:
> . It could only be a problem
> if 
> GRUB is not installed to the MBR but to a partition. 

i thought that was the setup described above (grub being 850GB into the
1TB disk), but i re-read again and gene was talking about /boot not
grub ... sorry for the confusion then, if grub sits in the MBR it
should surely find everything...

ciao
        oli
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Re: Out of Space

Liam Proven
On 9 August 2016 at 15:47, Oliver Grawert <[hidden email]> wrote:
> i thought that was the setup described above (grub being 850GB into the
> 1TB disk), but i re-read again and gene was talking about /boot not
> grub ... sorry for the confusion then, if grub sits in the MBR it
> should surely find everything...


If a large disk (terabyte+) is formatted as a single huge partition,
then yes, 5% of it for metadata is plausible.

But it's probably more normal to partition it up into smaller
subvolumes. E.g. my Mac's external 3TB drive has Ubuntu root & home
partitions, a Windows partition, a bootable copy of the previous
version of Mac OS X, and then a ~2TB Time Machine partition.

Yes, GRUB can be installed into the MBR (the normal way) or into a
partition's boot sector (needs `` -- force '' & it complains, but it
works).

The only issue I see here is that terabyte-sized drives are usually
partitioned with GPT, not MBR. With GPT there is no MBR present.
However, GPT disks are only bootable on UEFI machines. With UEFI, a
boot disk must have a ~100MB FAT32 system partition, and as I
understand it, GRUB goes in there, not in the disk's boot sector or in
the root partition's boot sector.

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Re: Out of Space

Gene Heskett-2
On Tuesday 09 August 2016 09:58:59 Liam Proven wrote:

> On 9 August 2016 at 15:47, Oliver Grawert <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > i thought that was the setup described above (grub being 850GB into
> > the 1TB disk), but i re-read again and gene was talking about /boot
> > not grub ... sorry for the confusion then, if grub sits in the MBR
> > it should surely find everything...
>
> If a large disk (terabyte+) is formatted as a single huge partition,
> then yes, 5% of it for metadata is plausible.
>
> But it's probably more normal to partition it up into smaller
> subvolumes. E.g. my Mac's external 3TB drive has Ubuntu root & home
> partitions, a Windows partition, a bootable copy of the previous
> version of Mac OS X, and then a ~2TB Time Machine partition.
>
> Yes, GRUB can be installed into the MBR (the normal way) or into a
> partition's boot sector (needs `` -- force '' & it complains, but it
> works).
>
> The only issue I see here is that terabyte-sized drives are usually
> partitioned with GPT, not MBR. With GPT there is no MBR present.
> However, GPT disks are only bootable on UEFI machines. With UEFI, a
> boot disk must have a ~100MB FAT32 system partition, and as I
> understand it, GRUB goes in there, not in the disk's boot sector or in
> the root partition's boot sector.

Following along with this thread while catching up on the yard work, I am
reading some disturbing info that I don't believe has been discussed.

What I am reading, is that since these motherboards are old enough that
every partion in my system is an MBR partition. They have no knowledge
of this UEFI thing.  And from that you are telling me such a thing as
this GPT is rather worthless to me. Your gdisk utility, if ran with
fdisk syntax, reports it finds valid MBR on both of the terabyte drives
currently in this machine, and says it will convert it to GPT as the
next operation. Since from what I've read here, that would be a
disastrous thing, I obviously typed a 'q'enter.

I've not yet installed the next drive so I'll have a playground. But if I
can't use a GPT partitioned drive anyway, please tell me why I should
bother?

MBR works fine on a terabyte drive, I've done it 5 or 6 times already.
The only PITA is trying to get the partitions aligned correctly on a
4k/sector drive, which 1 or 2, probably 3 when I hook the cables up to
this new drive. So far as I know, which is a little 'dated', none of the
partitioner's we have looks at your choices, and slightly adjusts the
MBR settings, either automatically, or by calling the speed killing
error to your attention.  Or have they now silently grown this ability?

This next drive WILL have to be a bootable (as /dev/sda) drive at some
point.  That is not optional.  And none of these MB's knows what UEFI
is.

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> MSN: [hidden email] • Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
> Cell/Mobiles: +44 7939-087884 (UK) • +420 702 829 053 (ČR)

Cheers, Gene Heskett
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-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
Genes Web page <http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene>

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Re: Out of Space

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by Liam Proven
On Tue, 9 Aug 2016 15:58:59 +0200, Liam Proven wrote:
>However, GPT disks are only bootable on UEFI machines.

Oops, then I don't need to test GPT, since I don't own such a machine.


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Re: Out of Space

Oliver Grawert
hi,
On Di, 2016-08-09 at 19:13 +0200, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
> On Tue, 9 Aug 2016 15:58:59 +0200, Liam Proven wrote:
> >
> > However, GPT disks are only bootable on UEFI machines.
>
> Oops, then I don't need to test GPT, since I don't own such a
> machine.
>
wow, really ? you must have very old HW then, i dont think after 2010
there were any non UEFI boards on the market anymore (apart from x86
based embedded/industrial boards perhaps)... it is pretty much the
standard for all mildly modern mainboards (note that even if your BIOS
looks like an old one it can be UEFI based, it doesn't need to have
fancy features like mouse support or shiny graphics, a good indicator
is if you have an option for doing BIOS updates directly from the BIOS,
without having to use a windows/dos boot, thats a typical UEFI feature)

ciao
        oli

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Re: Out of Space

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Tue, 09 Aug 2016 19:34:40 +0200, Oliver Grawert wrote:
>wow, really ? you must have very old HW then, i dont think after 2010
>there were any non UEFI boards on the market anymore (apart from x86
>based embedded/industrial boards perhaps)... it is pretty much the
>standard for all mildly modern mainboards (note that even if your BIOS
>looks like an old one it can be UEFI based, it doesn't need to have
>fancy features like mouse support or shiny graphics, a good indicator
>is if you have an option for doing BIOS updates directly from the BIOS,
>without having to use a windows/dos boot, thats a typical UEFI feature)

Hi,

the BIOS can be updated directly from the BIOS. I don't know when I
bought the Mobo, but the printed manual is from 2007 and the Mobo
already has PCIe slots. Much likely it was bought before 2010. How
often do you scrap hardware? Do you still own a soldering iron or
station, just in case you need to replace a power supply's capacitor or
to fix broken soldering joints of (now the bomb drops) a cathode ray
tube? Often CRTs aren't really broken, just a few soldering joints need
to be re-soldered.

Take a look at the pictures provided by the Link:

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=agbogbloshie+images

[rocketmouse@archlinux ~]$ sudo dmidecode -t 2
# dmidecode 3.0
Getting SMBIOS data from sysfs.
SMBIOS 2.4 present.

Handle 0x0003, DMI type 2, 8 bytes
Base Board Information
        Manufacturer: ASUSTeK Computer INC.
        Product Name: M2A-VM HDMI
        Version: 1.XX    
        Serial Number: 123456789000

[rocketmouse@archlinux ~]$ sudo lshw -c cpu
  *-cpu                    
       description: CPU
       product: AMD Athlon(tm) X2 Dual Core Processor BE-2350
       vendor: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD]
       physical id: 5
       bus info: cpu@0
       version: AMD Athlon(tm) X2 Dual Core Processor BE-2350
       slot: Socket AM2
       size: 2100MHz
       capacity: 3800MHz
       width: 64 bits
       clock: 200MHz
       capabilities: fpu fpu_exception wp vme de pse tsc msr pae mce
cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ht
syscall nx mmxext fxsr_opt rdtscp x86-64 3dnowext 3dnow rep_good nopl
extd_apicid eagerfpu pni cx16 lahf_lm cmp_legacy svm extapic cr8_legacy
3dnowprefetch vmmcall lbrv cpufreq

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Out of Space

Oliver Grawert
hi,
On Di, 2016-08-09 at 20:14 +0200, Ralf Mardorf wrote:


>
> the BIOS can be updated directly from the BIOS. I don't know when I
> bought the Mobo, but the printed manual is from 2007 and the Mobo
> already has PCIe slots. Much likely it was bought before 2010. How
> often do you scrap hardware? Do you still own a soldering iron or
> station, just in case you need to replace a power supply's capacitor
> or
> to fix broken soldering joints of (now the bomb drops) a cathode ray
> tube? Often CRTs aren't really broken, just a few soldering joints
> need
> to be re-soldered.
well, i tend to replace my workstation about every 4-5 years, though i
professionally use it and earn my money doing development on it,
perhaps i'm not actually representing the casual enduser here ... 
(i have servers in the basement using up the worn out parts from the
former workstations though)

(and yes, i own a bunch of soldering irons and stations and actually
regulary use them for embedded electronics and tube amp building) 

:)

ciao
        oli
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Re: Out of Space

Ralf Mardorf-2
On Tue, 09 Aug 2016 22:33:21 +0200, Oliver Grawert wrote:
>well, i tend to replace my workstation about every 4-5 years, though i
>professionally use it and earn my money doing development on it

Hi,

it doesn't matter if a computer is used for development or by an
end user. If the development is done on the latest hardware the result
much likely will have requirements like "64-bit dual-core or better x86
CPU with SSE3 support" -https://www.bitwig.com/en/support/faq.html ,
let alone desktop environments such as GNOME, that need faster 3D
support than Google Earth does. My CPU only supports SSE2 and while
Google earth is fast as lightning, GNOME is more or less unresponsive.
AFAIK even on the most fast computers a black box is visible when GTK3
adds widgets to a window. It's not only the high amount of computer
waste that is an issue, but also the exploitation of rare earths, let
alone exploitation of humans. The fundamental attitude to need always
the latest and greatest is a problem. Some people already consider that
earth is not overpopulated, just the available resources are misused by
a minority. Apart from a few exceptional tasks, there are no good
reasons to need one new computer after the other. Most end users only
need one new computer after the other, to run a browser on more and
more flashy desktop environments that are badly programmed.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Out of Space

Paul Smith-2
On Tue, 2016-08-09 at 23:22 +0200, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
> If the development is done on the latest hardware the result
> much likely will have requirements like "64-bit dual-core or better x86
> CPU with SSE3 support" -https://www.bitwig.com/en/support/faq.html ,
> let alone desktop environments such as GNOME, that need faster 3D
> support than Google Earth does.

Er... I don't want to say people should be forced to upgrade for no good
reason.  However, I don't think needing SSE3 to run well can really be
considered requiring "the latest and greatest hardware"!

SSE3 was released on Intel Prescott Pentium 4 CPUs in early 2004, and
was available on AMD systems in early 2005 on Athlon 64.  That's about
12 years ago... that doesn't seem like an outrageous requirement to me.
 If you really want to use such specialized systems I recommend that you
switch to a more specialized Linux distribution that caters to older and
lower-powered systems: they are definitely out there, for exactly these
situations!  That's what makes Linux great: it can cater to the entire
range of users needs.  But, not necessarily with the exact same
distribution!

My desktop at home uses a Q9300 Intel Core2 Quad (2.5GHz), which was
released in 2008, and I run the very latest Ubuntu GNOME on it and it
works absolutely fine.

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Re: Out of Space

Rolf Grunsky
In reply to this post by Gene Heskett-2
On 08/09/2016 12:50 PM, Gene Heskett wrote:

> On Tuesday 09 August 2016 09:58:59 Liam Proven wrote:
>
>> On 9 August 2016 at 15:47, Oliver Grawert <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> i thought that was the setup described above (grub being 850GB into
>>> the 1TB disk), but i re-read again and gene was talking about /boot
>>> not grub ... sorry for the confusion then, if grub sits in the MBR
>>> it should surely find everything...
>>
>> If a large disk (terabyte+) is formatted as a single huge partition,
>> then yes, 5% of it for metadata is plausible.
>>
>> But it's probably more normal to partition it up into smaller
>> subvolumes. E.g. my Mac's external 3TB drive has Ubuntu root & home
>> partitions, a Windows partition, a bootable copy of the previous
>> version of Mac OS X, and then a ~2TB Time Machine partition.
>>
>> Yes, GRUB can be installed into the MBR (the normal way) or into a
>> partition's boot sector (needs `` -- force '' & it complains, but it
>> works).
>>
>> The only issue I see here is that terabyte-sized drives are usually
>> partitioned with GPT, not MBR. With GPT there is no MBR present.
>> However, GPT disks are only bootable on UEFI machines. With UEFI, a
>> boot disk must have a ~100MB FAT32 system partition, and as I
>> understand it, GRUB goes in there, not in the disk's boot sector or in
>> the root partition's boot sector.
>
> Following along with this thread while catching up on the yard work, I am
> reading some disturbing info that I don't believe has been discussed.
>
> What I am reading, is that since these motherboards are old enough that
> every partion in my system is an MBR partition. They have no knowledge
> of this UEFI thing.  And from that you are telling me such a thing as
> this GPT is rather worthless to me. Your gdisk utility, if ran with
> fdisk syntax, reports it finds valid MBR on both of the terabyte drives
> currently in this machine, and says it will convert it to GPT as the
> next operation. Since from what I've read here, that would be a
> disastrous thing, I obviously typed a 'q'enter.
>
> I've not yet installed the next drive so I'll have a playground. But if I
> can't use a GPT partitioned drive anyway, please tell me why I should
> bother?
>
> MBR works fine on a terabyte drive, I've done it 5 or 6 times already.
> The only PITA is trying to get the partitions aligned correctly on a
> 4k/sector drive, which 1 or 2, probably 3 when I hook the cables up to
> this new drive. So far as I know, which is a little 'dated', none of the
> partitioner's we have looks at your choices, and slightly adjusts the
> MBR settings, either automatically, or by calling the speed killing
> error to your attention.  Or have they now silently grown this ability?
>
> This next drive WILL have to be a bootable (as /dev/sda) drive at some
> point.  That is not optional.  And none of these MB's knows what UEFI
> is.
>
>> --
>> Liam Proven • Profile: http://lproven.livejournal.com/profile
>> Email: [hidden email] • GMail/G+/Twitter/Flickr/Facebook: lproven
>> MSN: [hidden email] • Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
>> Cell/Mobiles: +44 7939-087884 (UK) • +420 702 829 053 (ČR)
>
> Cheers, Gene Heskett
>
Drives that are 2T or less can be partitioned either as GPT or MBR. My
XP system ran quite happily with 2 2T drives and XP required MBR
partitions. Drives larger than 2T MUST be partitioned as GPT (or maybe
something else depending on the OS, are MBR or GPT required for BSD?)
Drives larger than 2T CANNOT be partitioned as MBR!

If the drives in question are 2T or less than the partition type is not
relevant and other issues (i.e. BIOS issues) will be important.

R

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Re: Out of Space

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by Paul Smith-2
On Tue, 09 Aug 2016 17:39:23 -0400, Paul Smith wrote:

>On Tue, 2016-08-09 at 23:22 +0200, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
>> If the development is done on the latest hardware the result
>> much likely will have requirements like "64-bit dual-core or better
>> x86 CPU with SSE3 support"
>> -https://www.bitwig.com/en/support/faq.html , let alone desktop
>> environments such as GNOME, that need faster 3D support than Google
>> Earth does.  
>
>Er... I don't want to say people should be forced to upgrade for no
>good reason.  However, I don't think needing SSE3 to run well can
>really be considered requiring "the latest and greatest hardware"!
>
>SSE3 was released on Intel Prescott Pentium 4 CPUs in early 2004, and
>was available on AMD systems in early 2005 on Athlon 64.  That's about
>12 years ago... that doesn't seem like an outrageous requirement to me.
> If you really want to use such specialized systems I recommend that
>you switch to a more specialized Linux distribution that caters to
>older and lower-powered systems: they are definitely out there, for
>exactly these situations!  That's what makes Linux great: it can cater
>to the entire range of users needs.  But, not necessarily with the
>exact same distribution!
>
>My desktop at home uses a Q9300 Intel Core2 Quad (2.5GHz), which was
>released in 2008, and I run the very latest Ubuntu GNOME on it and it
>works absolutely fine.

I'm an Arch Linux user, I only use Ubuntu, too, to help inexperienced
users with Linux real-time audio. On the Ubuntu Studio devel mailing
list people even wish to get 32-bit support as long as possible.

The way computers, whiteware, entertainment gear is wasted nowadays
can't continue that much longer. The reason that "rare earth elements"
are named _rare_ earth elements, is that they are _rare_. One
day they need to be completely recycled and part of a recycling process
is repairing and keeping old hardware as well as writing software for
"old" hardware. Consuming the way a minority of humans, those from the
rich countries, is doing it now, could only continue a few decades, if
at all. If you don't have children and assuming you only care about
yourself, you could continue, if not, consider to think over this
attitude.

I don't think that many people bought SSE3 capable CPUs 12 years ago. I
guess even my CPU isn't that old.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Out of Space

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by Rolf Grunsky
On Tue, 9 Aug 2016 17:46:25 -0400, Rolf Grunsky wrote:
>Drives larger than 2T CANNOT be partitioned as MBR!

AFAIK they can be used with MBR, but not the full size can be used with
MBR.

>If the drives in question are 2T or less than the partition type is
>not relevant

Regarding the "Gene thread" it does matter, because Gene doesn't use an
UEFI mobo and booting from GPT drives seems to require UEFI capable
mobos. Regarding the "Richard thread" it matters, since we were talking
about primary and logical partitions and that some operating systems,
e.g. FreeBSD require a primary partition. However, this issue seems to
be null and void, when using GPT instead of MBR.


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Re: Out of Space

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by Gene Heskett-2
On 9 August 2016 at 18:50, Gene Heskett <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Following along with this thread while catching up on the yard work, I am
> reading some disturbing info that I don't believe has been discussed.
>
> What I am reading, is that since these motherboards are old enough that
> every partion in my system is an MBR partition.

You don't get to choose on a partition-by-partition basis. This is a
disk-by-disk thing.

A disk is either partitioned MBR (< 2TB) or GPT (> 2TB).

Between 1-2 you can choose, but MBR maxes out at 2TB. Greater than
that, you _must_ use GPT.

> They have no knowledge
> of this UEFI thing.  And from that you are telling me such a thing as
> this GPT is rather worthless to me.

If your OS boots off an MBR drive and it understands GPT, then you can
have and use >2TB drives on a machine with a plain old BIOS. But you
can't boot off them.

> Your gdisk utility,

My gdisk utility?!

I don't even know what ``gdisk'' _is_. Not mine!

>  if ran with
> fdisk syntax, reports it finds valid MBR on both of the terabyte drives
> currently in this machine,

1TB can use MBR fine, no problems.

> and says it will convert it to GPT as the
> next operation.

No idea what that tool is. Never seen it or used it or heard of it. If
you have a BIOS and all your drives are under 2TB, you don't need GPT
partition tables.

> Since from what I've read here, that would be a
> disastrous thing, I obviously typed a 'q'enter.
>
> I've not yet installed the next drive so I'll have a playground. But if I
> can't use a GPT partitioned drive anyway, please tell me why I should
> bother?

Over 2TB you have no choice.

> MBR works fine on a terabyte drive, I've done it 5 or 6 times already.

Yes it does.

> The only PITA is trying to get the partitions aligned correctly on a
> 4k/sector drive, which 1 or 2, probably 3 when I hook the cables up to
> this new drive. So far as I know, which is a little 'dated', none of the
> partitioner's we have looks at your choices, and slightly adjusts the
> MBR settings, either automatically, or by calling the speed killing
> error to your attention.  Or have they now silently grown this ability?

I've heard this is a problem. I don't own any so I don't know.

> This next drive WILL have to be a bootable (as /dev/sda) drive at some
> point.  That is not optional.  And none of these MB's knows what UEFI
> is.

Then you'd better stay with <= 2TB drives until you replace the m/b then.


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Re: Out of Space, and now way off topic!

Gene Heskett-2
In reply to this post by Oliver Grawert
On Tuesday 09 August 2016 16:33:21 Oliver Grawert wrote:

> hi,
>
> On Di, 2016-08-09 at 20:14 +0200, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
> > 
> >
> > the BIOS can be updated directly from the BIOS. I don't know when I
> > bought the Mobo, but the printed manual is from 2007 and the Mobo
> > already has PCIe slots. Much likely it was bought before 2010. How
> > often do you scrap hardware? Do you still own a soldering iron or
> > station, just in case you need to replace a power supply's capacitor
> > or
> > to fix broken soldering joints of (now the bomb drops) a cathode ray
> > tube? Often CRTs aren't really broken, just a few soldering joints
> > need
> > to be re-soldered.
>
> well, i tend to replace my workstation about every 4-5 years, though i
> professionally use it and earn my money doing development on it,
> perhaps i'm not actually representing the casual enduser here ... 
> (i have servers in the basement using up the worn out parts from the
> former workstations though)
>
> (and yes, i own a bunch of soldering irons and stations and actually
> regulary use them for embedded electronics and tube amp building) 
>
> :)
>
Oli, now I m wondering where you are on this ball of rock & water.

Here in the states, we have had a Certified Electronics Technician
program for around 40 some years.   I am one, registered in Nebraska as
NB-118, issued in 1972 but we are a rare bird as I checked before I
moved to New Mexico in late 1977 to see what they had added in 5 years,
only 4 more certificates, up to 122.

Where I was going, the sign on my office door was Chief Engineer.
I've found that the person who has that card in their card case has a
master key to employment.  It raises eyebrows when laid on the HR's
desk.

If you were in the states, there might be 2 year community college with a
prof teaching a class that is designed to help one pass that test,
someplace local to you.  I was at the time keeping a UHF ETV station on
he air.  Never cracked a book, just walked in at the advertised time and
said I'd like to take the test, which I aced in about 1/6th of the time
allocated, that and my accumulated time (20+ years) working in the field
qualified me for the full certificate.

I'd sure look into it if I was you.

Perhaps there is a similar group in your locale?

> ciao
> oli

Cheers Oli, Gene Heskett
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Genes Web page <http://geneslinuxbox.net:6309/gene>

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Re: Out of Space

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by Ralf Mardorf-2
On 9 August 2016 at 19:13, Ralf Mardorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Tue, 9 Aug 2016 15:58:59 +0200, Liam Proven wrote:
>>However, GPT disks are only bootable on UEFI machines.
>
> Oops, then I don't need to test GPT, since I don't own such a machine.


Me either, except my Mac.

And it runs Mac OS X. Because that is why I bought it.


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Re: Out of Space

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by Oliver Grawert
On 9 August 2016 at 19:34, Oliver Grawert <[hidden email]> wrote:
> wow, really ? you must have very old HW then, i dont think after 2010
> there were any non UEFI boards on the market anymore (apart from x86
> based embedded/industrial boards perhaps)... it is pretty much the
> standard for all mildly modern mainboards (note that even if your BIOS
> looks like an old one it can be UEFI based, it doesn't need to have
> fancy features like mouse support or shiny graphics, a good indicator
> is if you have an option for doing BIOS updates directly from the BIOS,
> without having to use a windows/dos boot, thats a typical UEFI feature)


Yes, true.

FWIW, I don't own a single UEFI PC either and never have. Never even
supported one yet.

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