Software updater no longer functional

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Software updater no longer functional

MR ZenWiz
About a week ago I noticed that my indicator for the software updater
had turned into the "do not enter" road sign (a red circle with a
horizontal white line in it).

If I click on it, it shows me the menu, but none of the menu items works.

If I open the settings app and click on the software updater once, it
does nothing.  If I double click it, it says I have stopped previous
updates from functioning and shows them.  However, if I click on the
Install Now button, the updater small frame window comes up empty and
never shows anything.

I posted about some of this a while back when it was getting errors
with the debconf library, but that was solved, or so I thought, by
using Synaptic to update that library.  It seems this was not a
complete fix.

Any suggestions?

Xubuntu 16.04.1 all the latest updates.

Attached is a text file showing the output that comes up when I run
this from a terminal window.

Thanks.
MR

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Re: Software updater no longer functional

Kevin O'Gorman
Hmmm.  It works for me....

On Thu, Jan 19, 2017 at 1:51 PM, MR ZenWiz <[hidden email]> wrote:
About a week ago I noticed that my indicator for the software updater
had turned into the "do not enter" road sign (a red circle with a
horizontal white line in it).

If I click on it, it shows me the menu, but none of the menu items works.

If I open the settings app and click on the software updater once, it
does nothing.  If I double click it, it says I have stopped previous
updates from functioning and shows them.  However, if I click on the
Install Now button, the updater small frame window comes up empty and
never shows anything.

I posted about some of this a while back when it was getting errors
with the debconf library, but that was solved, or so I thought, by
using Synaptic to update that library.  It seems this was not a
complete fix.

Any suggestions?

Xubuntu 16.04.1 all the latest updates.

Attached is a text file showing the output that comes up when I run
this from a terminal window.

Thanks.
MR

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Re: Software updater no longer functional

Bret Busby-2
In reply to this post by MR ZenWiz
On 20/01/2017, MR ZenWiz <[hidden email]> wrote:

> About a week ago I noticed that my indicator for the software updater
> had turned into the "do not enter" road sign (a red circle with a
> horizontal white line in it).
>
> If I click on it, it shows me the menu, but none of the menu items works.
>
> If I open the settings app and click on the software updater once, it
> does nothing.  If I double click it, it says I have stopped previous
> updates from functioning and shows them.  However, if I click on the
> Install Now button, the updater small frame window comes up empty and
> never shows anything.
>
> I posted about some of this a while back when it was getting errors
> with the debconf library, but that was solved, or so I thought, by
> using Synaptic to update that library.  It seems this was not a
> complete fix.
>
> Any suggestions?
>
> Xubuntu 16.04.1 all the latest updates.
>
> Attached is a text file showing the output that comes up when I run
> this from a terminal window.
>
> Thanks.
> MR
>

I do not know whether it is part of your problem, but I have been
getting this persistent malicious entry in the software updates -
"Automatic software updater", which seems to be a trojan with the
objective of turning the system into an unusable MS Windows - like
brick - forever updating and rebooting, and, when a user actually gets
a break in the paralysis, that allows the user to do something with
the computer, once the user starts using the computer, away it goes
again.

How do I block this trojan, so that I do not inadvertently miss
deselecting it in a required system update?

I am using UbuntuMATE 16.04 (updated, except for the trojan).


--

Bret Busby
Armadale
West Australia

..............

"So once you do know what the question actually is,
 you'll know what the answer means."
- Deep Thought,
 Chapter 28 of Book 1 of
 "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy:
 A Trilogy In Four Parts",
 written by Douglas Adams,
 published by Pan Books, 1992

....................................................

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Re: Software updater no longer functional

Bret Busby-2
On 20/01/2017, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 20/01/2017, MR ZenWiz <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> About a week ago I noticed that my indicator for the software updater
>> had turned into the "do not enter" road sign (a red circle with a
>> horizontal white line in it).
>>
>> If I click on it, it shows me the menu, but none of the menu items works.
>>
>> If I open the settings app and click on the software updater once, it
>> does nothing.  If I double click it, it says I have stopped previous
>> updates from functioning and shows them.  However, if I click on the
>> Install Now button, the updater small frame window comes up empty and
>> never shows anything.
>>
>> I posted about some of this a while back when it was getting errors
>> with the debconf library, but that was solved, or so I thought, by
>> using Synaptic to update that library.  It seems this was not a
>> complete fix.
>>
>> Any suggestions?
>>
>> Xubuntu 16.04.1 all the latest updates.
>>
>> Attached is a text file showing the output that comes up when I run
>> this from a terminal window.
>>
>> Thanks.
>> MR
>>
>
> I do not know whether it is part of your problem, but I have been
> getting this persistent malicious entry in the software updates -
> "Automatic software updater", which seems to be a trojan with the
> objective of turning the system into an unusable MS Windows - like
> brick - forever updating and rebooting, and, when a user actually gets
> a break in the paralysis, that allows the user to do something with
> the computer, once the user starts using the computer, away it goes
> again.
>
> How do I block this trojan, so that I do not inadvertently miss
> deselecting it in a required system update?
>
> I am using UbuntuMATE 16.04 (updated, except for the trojan).
>

Oh, and, with the MS Windows automated updating, all the MS Windows
computers have to be disconnected from the LAN, when not intentionally
in use, due to the incessant data transmission.

So, a way to block this "Automatic software updater", so that it does
not cripple the Linux systems, would be good.

--

Bret Busby
Armadale
West Australia

..............

"So once you do know what the question actually is,
 you'll know what the answer means."
- Deep Thought,
 Chapter 28 of Book 1 of
 "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy:
 A Trilogy In Four Parts",
 written by Douglas Adams,
 published by Pan Books, 1992

....................................................

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Re: Software updater no longer functional

MR ZenWiz
In reply to this post by Kevin O'Gorman
On Thu, Jan 19, 2017 at 2:46 PM, Kevin O'Gorman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Hmmm.  It works for me....
>
I wish I could appreciate this as a suggestion.

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Re: Software updater no longer functional

MR ZenWiz
In reply to this post by Bret Busby-2
On Thu, Jan 19, 2017 at 9:41 PM, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:
:

>
> I do not know whether it is part of your problem, but I have been
> getting this persistent malicious entry in the software updates -
> "Automatic software updater", which seems to be a trojan with the
> objective of turning the system into an unusable MS Windows - like
> brick - forever updating and rebooting, and, when a user actually gets
> a break in the paralysis, that allows the user to do something with
> the computer, once the user starts using the computer, away it goes
> again.
>
> How do I block this trojan, so that I do not inadvertently miss
> deselecting it in a required system update?
>
> I am using UbuntuMATE 16.04 (updated, except for the trojan).
>

Please do not hijack a thread with a different problem.  Start a new
one of your own, if you would.

Thanks.

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Re: Software updater no longer functional

Colin Law
In reply to this post by MR ZenWiz
On 19 January 2017 at 21:51, MR ZenWiz <[hidden email]> wrote:

> About a week ago I noticed that my indicator for the software updater
> had turned into the "do not enter" road sign (a red circle with a
> horizontal white line in it).
>
> If I click on it, it shows me the menu, but none of the menu items works.
>
> If I open the settings app and click on the software updater once, it
> does nothing.  If I double click it, it says I have stopped previous
> updates from functioning and shows them.  However, if I click on the
> Install Now button, the updater small frame window comes up empty and
> never shows anything.
>
> I posted about some of this a while back when it was getting errors
> with the debconf library, but that was solved, or so I thought, by
> using Synaptic to update that library.  It seems this was not a
> complete fix.
>
> Any suggestions?

Does you see any errors if you run, in a terminal,
sudo apt-get update and sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

and do you still see the problem after running the upgrade?

Colin

>
> Xubuntu 16.04.1 all the latest updates.
>
> Attached is a text file showing the output that comes up when I run
> this from a terminal window.
>
> Thanks.
> MR
>
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> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>

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Re: Software updater no longer functional

MR ZenWiz
On Fri, Jan 20, 2017 at 2:37 AM, Colin Law <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 19 January 2017 at 21:51, MR ZenWiz <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> About a week ago I noticed that my indicator for the software updater
>> had turned into the "do not enter" road sign (a red circle with a
>> horizontal white line in it).
>>
>> If I click on it, it shows me the menu, but none of the menu items works.
>>
>> If I open the settings app and click on the software updater once, it
>> does nothing.  If I double click it, it says I have stopped previous
>> updates from functioning and shows them.  However, if I click on the
>> Install Now button, the updater small frame window comes up empty and
>> never shows anything.
>>
>> I posted about some of this a while back when it was getting errors
>> with the debconf library, but that was solved, or so I thought, by
>> using Synaptic to update that library.  It seems this was not a
>> complete fix.
>>
>> Any suggestions?
>
> Does you see any errors if you run, in a terminal,
> sudo apt-get update and sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
>
> and do you still see the problem after running the upgrade?
>
No and yes, in that order.

Thanks.

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Re: Software updater no longer functional

Liam Proven
On 20 January 2017 at 20:00, MR ZenWiz <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Does you see any errors if you run, in a terminal,
>> sudo apt-get update and sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
>>
>> and do you still see the problem after running the upgrade?
>>
> No and yes, in that order.


Next steps:

sudo apt-get install -f

 -- fixes any package errors

NOTE THEM DOWN if it doesn't work & tell us

sudo apt-get clean

 -- empty the package cache

sudo apt-get autoremove -y

 -- remove obsoleted packages & ones nothing else use

sudo touch /forcefsck
sudo shutdown -r now

Force a full filesystem check and repair then reboot

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Why do all the sudo? [was Re: Software updater no longer functional]

Chris Green
This is a classic case where I wonder why not change:-

>
> Next steps:
>
> sudo apt-get install -f
>
>  -- fixes any package errors
>
> NOTE THEM DOWN if it doesn't work & tell us
>
> sudo apt-get clean
>
>  -- empty the package cache
>
> sudo apt-get autoremove -y
>
>  -- remove obsoleted packages & ones nothing else use
>
> sudo touch /forcefsck
> sudo shutdown -r now
>

to:-

>
> Next steps:
>
> sudo -i
> apt-get install -f
>
>  -- fixes any package errors
>
> NOTE THEM DOWN if it doesn't work & tell us
>
> apt-get clean
>
>  -- empty the package cache
>
> apt-get autoremove -y
>
>  -- remove obsoleted packages & ones nothing else use
>
> touch /forcefsck
> shutdown -r now
>

It saves typing!  :-)

This is by no means the worst case, you often see great streams of
'sudo this' and 'sudo that' in descriptions of how to do things.

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Re: Why do all the sudo? [was Re: Software updater no longer functional]

Dick Dowdell
Why not just abandon file permissions altogether? Linux is a multi-user operating system. Without the protection of file permissions, we would have chaos. I am a very slow typist, but I do not mind typing 4 little characters, 'sudo'.

Dick Dowdell
Phone: 508-528-4018  Mobile: 508-498-7919

On Sun, Jan 22, 2017 at 7:37 AM, Chris Green <[hidden email]> wrote:
This is a classic case where I wonder why not change:-

>
> Next steps:
>
> sudo apt-get install -f
>
>  -- fixes any package errors
>
> NOTE THEM DOWN if it doesn't work & tell us
>
> sudo apt-get clean
>
>  -- empty the package cache
>
> sudo apt-get autoremove -y
>
>  -- remove obsoleted packages & ones nothing else use
>
> sudo touch /forcefsck
> sudo shutdown -r now
>

to:-

>
> Next steps:
>
> sudo -i
> apt-get install -f
>
>  -- fixes any package errors
>
> NOTE THEM DOWN if it doesn't work & tell us
>
> apt-get clean
>
>  -- empty the package cache
>
> apt-get autoremove -y
>
>  -- remove obsoleted packages & ones nothing else use
>
> touch /forcefsck
> shutdown -r now
>

It saves typing!  :-)

This is by no means the worst case, you often see great streams of
'sudo this' and 'sudo that' in descriptions of how to do things.

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Re: Why do all the sudo? [was Re: Software updater no longer functional]

Chris Green
On Sun, Jan 22, 2017 at 08:15:22AM -0500, Dick Dowdell wrote:
>    Why not just abandon file permissions altogether? Linux is a multi-user
>    operating system. Without the protection of file permissions, we would
>    have chaos. I am a very slow typist, but I do not mind typing 4 little
>    characters, 'sudo'.
>
Nothing to do with ignoring permissions, you still have to 'sudo'.

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Re: Why do all the sudo? [was Re: Software updater no longer functional]

Tony Arnold-3
In reply to this post by Chris Green
Chris,

On Sun, 2017-01-22 at 12:37 +0000, Chris Green wrote:

> This is a classic case where I wonder why not change:-
>
> >
> > Next steps:
> >
> > sudo apt-get install -f
> >
> >  -- fixes any package errors
> >
> > NOTE THEM DOWN if it doesn't work & tell us
> >
> > sudo apt-get clean
> >
> >  -- empty the package cache
> >
> > sudo apt-get autoremove -y
> >
> >  -- remove obsoleted packages & ones nothing else use
> >
> > sudo touch /forcefsck
> > sudo shutdown -r now
> >
>
> to:-
>
> >
> > Next steps:
> >
> > sudo -i
> > apt-get install -f
> >
> >  -- fixes any package errors
> >
> > NOTE THEM DOWN if it doesn't work & tell us
> >
> > apt-get clean
> >
> >  -- empty the package cache
> >
> > apt-get autoremove -y
> >
> >  -- remove obsoleted packages & ones nothing else use
> >
> > touch /forcefsck
> > shutdown -r now
> >
>
> It saves typing!  :-)
>
> This is by no means the worst case, you often see great streams of
> 'sudo this' and 'sudo that' in descriptions of how to do things.
>

Yep! Couldn't agree more. I use 'sudo -i' a lot! But it's rarely
suggested in any advice or documentation I've seen.

Regards,
Tony.
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Re: Why do all the sudo? [was Re: Software updater no longer functional]

Chris Green
On Sun, Jan 22, 2017 at 04:47:05PM +0000, Tony Arnold wrote:
> > It saves typing!  :-)
> >
> > This is by no means the worst case, you often see great streams of
> > 'sudo this' and 'sudo that' in descriptions of how to do things.
> >
>
> Yep! Couldn't agree more. I use 'sudo -i' a lot! But it's rarely
> suggested in any advice or documentation I've seen.
>
Well someone agrees with me!  :-)

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Re: Why do all the sudo? [was Re: Software updater no longer functional]

Ken D'Ambrosio
I think the answer is, realistically, that that way you know which
commands are privileged, and which ones aren't.  Most admins in the real
world do do "sudo -i" or "sudo bash" or somesuch.  But sometimes you
*shouldn't* execute a command as sudo -- e.g., if it's going to suddenly
create a file, it will now have root ownership, which you may not want.

So I say, "Rock on with 'sudo' in instructions," and real world use can
reflect whatever you're comfortable with.

-Ken


On 2017-01-22 12:01, Chris Green wrote:

> On Sun, Jan 22, 2017 at 04:47:05PM +0000, Tony Arnold wrote:
>> > It saves typing!  :-)
>> >
>> > This is by no means the worst case, you often see great streams of
>> > 'sudo this' and 'sudo that' in descriptions of how to do things.
>> >
>>
>> Yep! Couldn't agree more. I use 'sudo -i' a lot! But it's rarely
>> suggested in any advice or documentation I've seen.
>>
> Well someone agrees with me!  :-)
>
> --
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Re: Why do all the sudo? [was Re: Software updater no longer functional]

Robert Heller
In reply to this post by Tony Arnold-3
At Sun, 22 Jan 2017 16:47:05 +0000 "Ubuntu user technical support,  not for general discussions" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Chris,
>
> On Sun, 2017-01-22 at 12:37 +0000, Chris Green wrote:
> > This is a classic case where I wonder why not change:-
> >
> > >
> > > Next steps:
> > >
> > > sudo apt-get install -f
> > >
> > >  -- fixes any package errors
> > >
> > > NOTE THEM DOWN if it doesn't work & tell us
> > >
> > > sudo apt-get clean
> > >
> > >  -- empty the package cache
> > >
> > > sudo apt-get autoremove -y
> > >
> > >  -- remove obsoleted packages & ones nothing else use
> > >
> > > sudo touch /forcefsck
> > > sudo shutdown -r now
> > >
> >
> > to:-
> >
> > >
> > > Next steps:
> > >
> > > sudo -i
> > > apt-get install -f
> > >
> > >  -- fixes any package errors
> > >
> > > NOTE THEM DOWN if it doesn't work & tell us
> > >
> > > apt-get clean
> > >
> > >  -- empty the package cache
> > >
> > > apt-get autoremove -y
> > >
> > >  -- remove obsoleted packages & ones nothing else use
> > >
> > > touch /forcefsck
> > > shutdown -r now
> > >
> >
> > It saves typing!  :-)
> >
> > This is by no means the worst case, you often see great streams of
> > 'sudo this' and 'sudo that' in descriptions of how to do things.
> >
>
> Yep! Couldn't agree more. I use 'sudo -i' a lot! But it's rarely
> suggested in any advice or documentation I've seen.
This is intentional.

sudo -i is *dangerous* for exactly the same reason "su" is dangerous.  One
of the whole points of sudo was to avoid logging in as root or using the su
command.  Before sudo was "invented", UNIX sys admins regularly logged in as
root and/or used su to gain a root shell.  And just as often shot themselves
in the foot.  Sudo is very much like the safety lever on guns -- the point is
to prevent accidents.

It is far too easy to *forget* that one is root and do something stupid.  Also
it is possible to leave your system open to someone sitting down at your
screen and doing something bad.

It is *always* preferable to prefix one command at a time with sudo.

This is proper system administration 101.

One of the *strong* things about Linux is that one *never* just logs in as the
"administrator" (root). One of the *weak* features of MS-Windows is that
people often log in as an administrator user.

>
> Regards,
> Tony.

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Re: Why do all the sudo? [was Re: Software updater no longer functional]

Ken D'Ambrosio
On 2017-01-22 12:12, Robert Heller wrote:

>> Yep! Couldn't agree more. I use 'sudo -i' a lot! But it's rarely
>> suggested in any advice or documentation I've seen.
>
> This is intentional.

It is.  But...

> sudo -i is *dangerous* for exactly the same reason "su" is dangerous.  
> One
> of the whole points of sudo was to avoid logging in as root or using
> the su
> command.  Before sudo was "invented", UNIX sys admins regularly logged
> in as
> root and/or used su to gain a root shell.  And just as often shot
> themselves
> in the foot.  Sudo is very much like the safety lever on guns -- the
> point is
> to prevent accidents.
>
> It is far too easy to *forget* that one is root and do something
> stupid.  Also
> it is possible to leave your system open to someone sitting down at
> your
> screen and doing something bad.

This is where I have to tepidly disagree.  No matter what you're doing,
if you start doing mindless repetition of something (e.g., prefacing
commands with 'sudo'), you're vastly more likely to make a Stupid
Mistake.  To me, I do 'sudo bash' when I'm doing something specifically
system-administrationish, and then, when done, log out.  If I can't
remember to do that, I really shouldn't be being an admin in the first
place.  As for someone sitting at your desk, a) if you're not working
with trustworthy people, you should either quit or fire them, and b) you
should also, regardless, have a screensaver going with a relatively
short timeout.

NOTE: I am not-not-not saying that sudo is a bad thing, and that you
should do one-off use of it most of the time.  But if you're doing 100
commands in a row (e.g,. during a complex configuration operation), by
the time you get to #20, you'll be typing 'sudo' in front, stupidly, and
without thinking.  That's even worse.

I also say this as someone with 30 years' admin experience, over 20 of
them with Linux specifically.  And the worst damage I've ever done was
knowingly (e.g., time time I followed instructions and blew away a
partition -- only to find out that the person giving instructions hadn't
done their backups right), or not as admin.

The keyword here is *always* be careful when issuing destructive
commands, regardless of what user you are.

-Ken

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Re: Why do all the sudo? [was Re: Software updater no longer functional]

Smoot Carl-Mitchell
In reply to this post by Chris Green
On Sun, 2017-01-22 at 17:01 +0000, Chris Green wrote:

> On Sun, Jan 22, 2017 at 04:47:05PM +0000, Tony Arnold wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > It saves typing!  :-)
> > >
> > > This is by no means the worst case, you often see great streams
> > > of
> > > 'sudo this' and 'sudo that' in descriptions of how to do things.
> > >
> > Yep! Couldn't agree more. I use 'sudo -i' a lot! But it's rarely
> > suggested in any advice or documentation I've seen.
> >
> Well someone agrees with me!  :-)

sudo provides a good audit trail of the commands run as root.  I have
found it invaluable in tracking down some types of errors.  sudo -i
just changes the uid to root and provides no real audit trail in the
logs.  After a while I found typing sudo just becomes second nature.
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Re: Why do all the sudo? [Admins like going on holiday]

Paul Sladen-2
In reply to this post by Ken D'Ambrosio
On Sun, 22 Jan 2017, Ken D'Ambrosio wrote:
> Most admins in the real world do do "sudo **" or "sudo ****"

Most admins in real world like going on holiday sometimes.[*]

Going on holiday means working together with other admins.

Working together means sharing information between admins.

Sharing information with 'sudo' is easy: 'sudo' does automatic
logging!  (But 'sudo **' and 'sudo ****' do not).

So feel free to do such things on an individual basis, but please
don't direct others with such habits... because perhaps, one day,
the people being trained may want to go on holiday too.

        -Paul

[*] Sweeping generalisation alert.




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Re: Why do all the sudo? [was Re: Software updater no longer functional]

Ralf Mardorf-2
In reply to this post by Ken D'Ambrosio
You are comparing oranges and bananas.

It's no problem if a user prefers

  sudo -s

or

  sudo -i

or even

  su

but it's also no problem, if a Wiki explains something step by step.
It is good practice for a documentation, to do it step by step.

A user also might prefer to use command line features, as well as
combinations of commands, that make daily usage of the command line
comfortable, but a howto less clear. If I edit a Wiki I don't use
command line short cuts, neither long lines that make my work-flow more
pleasant, with lots of pipes and things like this. I even avoid
bashisms.

I most likely would use

  $ su
  # apt update && apt install linux{-image,-headers}-4.4.0-21-generic

but writing a Wiki like this

  $ sudo apt update
  $ sudo apt install linux-image-4.4.0-21-generic
  $ sudo apt install linux-headers-4.4.0-21-generic

the first is more comfortable, the latter is easier to understand.

Regards,
Ralf


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