Upgrade problem

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Bob
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Upgrade problem

Bob
I am having a problem upgrading to 19.04 from 18.10 using the GUI.

What commands do I need to run in a terminal to upgrade the system?

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Re: Upgrade problem

ubuntu-users mailing list
On Fri, 17 May 2019 22:54:06 -0700, Bob wrote:
>I am having a problem upgrading to 19.04 from 18.10 using the GUI.

Hi,

what problem do you have? Without describing the issue, we can't
recommend to run something from command line.

>What commands do I need to run in a terminal to upgrade the system?

Usually 04 releases are LTS releases, regarding
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases 19.04 seems to  be no LTS. However,
perhaps do-release-upgrade considers it as a LTS, so it will not work
until 19.04.1 is released. As a workaround you could use the "-d"
option to upgrade, see
https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/installing-upgrading.html.en#do-release-upgrade.

Since we don't know what problem you experience when trying to upgrade
by the GUI, I recommend that you don't use command line.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Upgrade problem

Colin Law


On Sat, 18 May 2019, 07:55 Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users, <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Fri, 17 May 2019 22:54:06 -0700, Bob wrote:
>I am having a problem upgrading to 19.04 from 18.10 using the GUI.

Hi,

what problem do you have? Without describing the issue, we can't
recommend to run something from command line.

>What commands do I need to run in a terminal to upgrade the system?

Usually 04 releases are LTS releases, regarding
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases 19.04 seems to  be no LTS. However,
perhaps do-release-upgrade considers it as a LTS, so it will not work
until 19.04.1 is released. As a workaround you could use the "-d"
option to upgrade, see
https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/installing-upgrading.html.en#do-release-upgrade.

Don't use -d, it might go to 19.10

Colin



Since we don't know what problem you experience when trying to upgrade
by the GUI, I recommend that you don't use command line.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Upgrade problem

C de-Avillez-2
In reply to this post by ubuntu-users mailing list
On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 6:54 AM Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Usually 04 releases are LTS releases, regarding
> https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases 19.04 seems to  be no LTS. However,
> perhaps do-release-upgrade considers it as a LTS, so it will not work
> until 19.04.1 is released. As a workaround you could use the "-d"

Actually, LTSs are <even year>.04, so 19.04 is not LTS. The next LTS
will be 20.04.

Cheers,

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Re: Upgrade problem

Richard Barmann
In reply to this post by Colin Law

I have 19.04. I have 54 upgrades showing in the bottom margin. Update manager says there are no updates. when I go  to Software & updates the third choice "when there are other updates." the choice is blank.

Richard Barmann

On 5/18/2019 12:44 PM, Colin Law wrote:


On Sat, 18 May 2019, 07:55 Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users, <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Fri, 17 May 2019 22:54:06 -0700, Bob wrote:
>I am having a problem upgrading to 19.04 from 18.10 using the GUI.

Hi,

what problem do you have? Without describing the issue, we can't
recommend to run something from command line.

>What commands do I need to run in a terminal to upgrade the system?

Usually 04 releases are LTS releases, regarding
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases 19.04 seems to  be no LTS. However,
perhaps do-release-upgrade considers it as a LTS, so it will not work
until 19.04.1 is released. As a workaround you could use the "-d"
option to upgrade, see
https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/installing-upgrading.html.en#do-release-upgrade.

Don't use -d, it might go to 19.10

Colin



Since we don't know what problem you experience when trying to upgrade
by the GUI, I recommend that you don't use command line.

Regards,
Ralf


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Re: Upgrade problem

Bob
In reply to this post by ubuntu-users mailing list
** Reply to message from Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users
<[hidden email]> on Sat, 18 May 2019 08:53:18 +0200

> On Fri, 17 May 2019 22:54:06 -0700, Bob wrote:
> >I am having a problem upgrading to 19.04 from 18.10 using the GUI.
>
> Hi,
>
> what problem do you have? Without describing the issue, we can't
> recommend to run something from command line.

I click on "settings" click "details" click "check for updates" and get a
message that says "software is up to date".

Also I have not had a popup to update the system for a month or two.  In
"software & updates" I have set to check for updates every two weeks and for
every new version.


> >What commands do I need to run in a terminal to upgrade the system?
>
> Usually 04 releases are LTS releases, regarding
> https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases 19.04 seems to  be no LTS. However,
> perhaps do-release-upgrade considers it as a LTS, so it will not work
> until 19.04.1 is released. As a workaround you could use the "-d"
> option to upgrade, see
> https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/installing-upgrading.html.en#do-release-upgrade.
>
> Since we don't know what problem you experience when trying to upgrade
> by the GUI, I recommend that you don't use command line.

The GUI does not work, unless there is some other place to do the update.  I am
not much of a command line user which why I asked what commands I should use to
update the system.

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Re: Upgrade problem

Colin Law
On Sun, 19 May 2019 at 05:48, Bob <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> The GUI does not work, unless there is some other place to do the update.  I am
> not much of a command line user which why I asked what commands I should use to
> update the system.

Start by running this to get it all up to date for the current installed version
sudo apt update && sudo apt full-upgrade
If there are any errors shown then post it here.
Otherwise to upgrade to 19.04 use
sudo apt do-release-upgrade
but don't do that until the first command completes without error.
If that says no new releases found then open the GUI command Software
And Updates and in the  Updates tab check that Notify is set to 'For
any new version'.

Colin

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Re: Upgrade problem

Robert Heller
In reply to this post by Richard Barmann
At Sun, 19 May 2019 02:04:40 -0400 "Ubuntu user technical support,  not for general discussions" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Content-Language: en-US
>
>
> I have 19.04. I have 54 upgrades showing in the bottom margin. Update
> manager says there are no updates. when I go  to Software & updates the
> third choice "when there are other updates." the choice is blank.

You probably need to do (at the command line):

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

This *should* get things up-to-date.

>
> Richard Barmann
>
> On 5/18/2019 12:44 PM, Colin Law wrote:
> >
> >
> > On Sat, 18 May 2019, 07:55 Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users,
> > <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>>
> > wrote:
> >
> >     On Fri, 17 May 2019 22:54:06 -0700, Bob wrote:
> >     >I am having a problem upgrading to 19.04 from 18.10 using the GUI.
> >
> >     Hi,
> >
> >     what problem do you have? Without describing the issue, we can't
> >     recommend to run something from command line.
> >
> >     >What commands do I need to run in a terminal to upgrade the system?
> >
> >     Usually 04 releases are LTS releases, regarding
> >     https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases 19.04 seems to  be no LTS. However,
> >     perhaps do-release-upgrade considers it as a LTS, so it will not work
> >     until 19.04.1 is released. As a workaround you could use the "-d"
> >     option to upgrade, see
> >     https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/installing-upgrading.html.en#do-release-upgrade.
> >
> >     Don't use -d, it might go to 19.10
> >
> >
> > Colin
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >     Since we don't know what problem you experience when trying to upgrade
> >     by the GUI, I recommend that you don't use command line.
> >
> >     Regards,
> >     Ralf
> >
> >
> >     --
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> >     https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
> >
> >
>
> MIME-Version: 1.0
>
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Re: Upgrade problem

ubuntu-users mailing list
On Sun, 19 May 2019 07:47:26 -0400 (EDT), Robert Heller wrote:
>sudo apt-get update
>sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

The time has come to post the official way to do it, as done by Colin
on Sun, 19 May 2019 08:30:14 +0100:
>sudo apt update && sudo apt full-upgrade

apt is not just an alias for apt-get and dist-upgarde is not just
another name for full-upgrade.



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Re: Upgrade problem

Robert Heller
At Sun, 19 May 2019 14:05:24 +0200 "Ubuntu user technical support,  not for general discussions" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> On Sun, 19 May 2019 07:47:26 -0400 (EDT), Robert Heller wrote:
> >sudo apt-get update
> >sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
>
> The time has come to post the official way to do it, as done by Colin
> on Sun, 19 May 2019 08:30:14 +0100:
> >sudo apt update && sudo apt full-upgrade
>
> apt is not just an alias for apt-get and dist-upgarde is not just
> another name for full-upgrade.

What are the differences?

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

Seemed to be the "right thing" for Ubuntu 14.04 (and seems to work for 18.04
and Raspbian on my 'Pis and for Debian 9 on my Beagles), but what is the
"right thing" for Ubuntu 18.04?

(I an *relatively* new to Ubuntu/Debian, having been using RedHat / CentOS
since like forever.)


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Re: Upgrade problem

Colin Law
On Sun, 19 May 2019 at 16:31, Robert Heller <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> At Sun, 19 May 2019 14:05:24 +0200 "Ubuntu user technical support,  not for general discussions" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> >
> > On Sun, 19 May 2019 07:47:26 -0400 (EDT), Robert Heller wrote:
> > >sudo apt-get update
> > >sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
> >
> > The time has come to post the official way to do it, as done by Colin
> > on Sun, 19 May 2019 08:30:14 +0100:
> > >sudo apt update && sudo apt full-upgrade
> >
> > apt is not just an alias for apt-get and dist-upgarde is not just
> > another name for full-upgrade.
>
> What are the differences?
>
> sudo apt-get update
> sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
>
> Seemed to be the "right thing" for Ubuntu 14.04 (and seems to work for 18.04
> and Raspbian on my 'Pis and for Debian 9 on my Beagles), but what is the
> "right thing" for Ubuntu 18.04?

Either is fine.  apt is the later command but apt-get has been
retained so as not to blow up old scripts.
I know that Ralf suggests there is a difference between apt
full-upgrade and apt-get dist-upgrade but I don't think any
differences are of great importance (if there actually are any).

Colin

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Re: Upgrade problem

ubuntu-users mailing list
In reply to this post by Robert Heller
On Sun, 2019-05-19 at 11:29 -0400, Robert Heller wrote:
> What are the differences?
>
> sudo apt-get update
> sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
>
> Seemed to be the "right thing"

Hi,

apt-get dist-upgrade should work perfectly, too. However, the official
Ubuntu tool nowadays is apt.

  https://askubuntu.com/questions/770135/apt-full-upgrade-versus-apt-get-dist-upgrade

The apt replacements for several apt-get and dpkg commands are more
user-friendly. The helper gdebi could be replaced by apt install, to
install a local package and to resolve dependencies from repositories.

It's not recommended to use apt for scripts, but actually I never
experienced an issue:

  [weremouse@moonstudio ~]$ apt list -a linux-lowlatency | grep installed

  WARNING: apt does not have a stable CLI interface. Use with caution in scripts.

  linux-lowlatency/xenial-updates,xenial-security,now 4.4.0.148.156 amd64 [installed]

Regards,
Ralf



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Re: Upgrade problem

Robert Heller
At Sun, 19 May 2019 18:19:49 +0200 Ralf Mardorf <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> On Sun, 2019-05-19 at 11:29 -0400, Robert Heller wrote:
> > What are the differences?
> >
> > sudo apt-get update
> > sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
> >
> > Seemed to be the "right thing"
>
> Hi,
>
> apt-get dist-upgrade should work perfectly, too. However, the official
> Ubuntu tool nowadays is apt.
>
>   https://askubuntu.com/questions/770135/apt-full-upgrade-versus-apt-get-dist-upgrade
>
> The apt replacements for several apt-get and dpkg commands are more
> user-friendly. The helper gdebi could be replaced by apt install, to

Arg "user-friendly"... There are different meanings for "user-friendly".  *I*
don't want a pointy-clicky "user friendly" interface -- I do almost ALL of the
updates of the various Ubuntu/Debian boxen from the command line, often using
a *plain* xterm over a ssh connection.  I really don't need/want an
application to demand the use of GUI to do things like display progesss meters
or other "friendly* eye candy.

> install a local package and to resolve dependencies from repositories.
>
> It's not recommended to use apt for scripts, but actually I never
> experienced an issue:
>
>   [weremouse@moonstudio ~]$ apt list -a linux-lowlatency | grep installed
>
>   WARNING: apt does not have a stable CLI interface. Use with caution in scripts.

This is suggestive (and tells *me* I really want to avoid apt).

>
>   linux-lowlatency/xenial-updates,xenial-security,now 4.4.0.148.156 amd64 [installed]
>
> Regards,
> Ralf
>
>
>                                                                                                                                

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Re: Upgrade problem

Bob
In reply to this post by Colin Law
** Reply to message from Colin Law <[hidden email]> on Sun, 19 May 2019
08:30:14 +0100

> On Sun, 19 May 2019 at 05:48, Bob <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > The GUI does not work, unless there is some other place to do the update.  I am
> > not much of a command line user which why I asked what commands I should use to
> > update the system.
>
> Start by running this to get it all up to date for the current installed version
> sudo apt update && sudo apt full-upgrade

Ran that command and got an error message.

E: dpkg was interrupted, you must manually run 'sudo dpkg --configure -a' to
correct the problem.

I ran that command and then reran the update commands.  Those commands ran for
about 15 minutes and ended without any errors I cound see.


> If there are any errors shown then post it here.
> Otherwise to upgrade to 19.04 use
> sudo apt do-release-upgrade

That command gives the following error message.

E: Invalid operation do-release-upgrade

Rebooted the system and tried the command again with the same error message.


> but don't do that until the first command completes without error.
> If that says no new releases found then open the GUI command Software
> And Updates and in the  Updates tab check that Notify is set to 'For
> any new version'.

The "For any new version"  option was already set.


>
> Colin

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Re: Upgrade problem

Colin Watson
In reply to this post by Robert Heller
On Sun, May 19, 2019 at 05:36:05PM -0400, Robert Heller wrote:

> At Sun, 19 May 2019 18:19:49 +0200 Ralf Mardorf <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > apt-get dist-upgrade should work perfectly, too. However, the official
> > Ubuntu tool nowadays is apt.
> >
> >   https://askubuntu.com/questions/770135/apt-full-upgrade-versus-apt-get-dist-upgrade
> >
> > The apt replacements for several apt-get and dpkg commands are more
> > user-friendly. The helper gdebi could be replaced by apt install, to
>
> Arg "user-friendly"... There are different meanings for "user-friendly".  *I*
> don't want a pointy-clicky "user friendly" interface -- I do almost ALL of the
> updates of the various Ubuntu/Debian boxen from the command line, often using
> a *plain* xterm over a ssh connection.  I really don't need/want an
> application to demand the use of GUI to do things like display progesss meters
> or other "friendly* eye candy.

This comment isn't relevant here: apt(8) isn't a GUI tool.

> > It's not recommended to use apt for scripts, but actually I never
> > experienced an issue:
> >
> >   [weremouse@moonstudio ~]$ apt list -a linux-lowlatency | grep installed
> >
> >   WARNING: apt does not have a stable CLI interface. Use with caution in scripts.
>
> This is suggestive (and tells *me* I really want to avoid apt).

It means that one should be careful when writing scripts that use apt(8)
since the exact details of some of its subcommands/options may change
(although I wouldn't over-read this - its commonly-used facilities have
been pretty stable in practice since it was introduced).

It doesn't mean that it's somehow going to metamorphose into a GUI tool.
apt(8) is intended for use by people operating their systems at the
command line, and is suitable for that purpose.

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Re: Upgrade problem

Colin Watson
In reply to this post by Colin Law
On Sun, May 19, 2019 at 04:43:50PM +0100, Colin Law wrote:
> I know that Ralf suggests there is a difference between apt
> full-upgrade and apt-get dist-upgrade but I don't think any
> differences are of great importance (if there actually are any).

There aren't really, no.  "apt-get dist-upgrade" and "apt full-upgrade"
run precisely identical upgrade resolution code.  The only differences
are some tiny details of tool initialisation.  As far as I know, the new
name was introduced simply because "dist-upgrade" was a rather
misleading name: while it was especially useful for upgrading between
major versions of the distribution, it was also useful at many other
times, and users were often confused by this.  So it is indeed better to
recommend "apt full-upgrade", but only because the name is better for
teaching purposes.

The real logic difference is between "apt-get upgrade" and "apt
upgrade".  Neither of those commands will remove packages that are
currently installed.  However, the former will never install new
packages, while the latter will install new packages if needed to
satisfy dependencies.  Since even very straightforward upgrades often
need to introduce new dependencies (for example, a change in a library's
SONAME, where old and new versions of the library can coexist on the
system), "apt-get upgrade" was something that looked safe but was often
too restrictive to be useful, while "apt upgrade" retains the safety
catch of not removing existing packages but is much more useful in
practice.

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Re: Upgrade problem

Paul Smith-2
In reply to this post by Bob
On Sun, 2019-05-19 at 15:50 -0700, Bob wrote:
> > If there are any errors shown then post it here.
> > Otherwise to upgrade to 19.04 use
> > sudo apt do-release-upgrade
>
> That command gives the following error message.
>
> E: Invalid operation do-release-upgrade
>
> Rebooted the system and tried the command again with the same error message.

The command provided is incorrect; do-release-upgrade is a stand-alone
command, not an apt subcommand.

You want simply:

  sudo do-release-upgrade



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Re: Upgrade problem

ubuntu-users mailing list
In reply to this post by Colin Watson
On Mon, 2019-05-20 at 00:12 +0100, Colin Watson wrote:
> As far as I know, the new name was introduced simply because "dist-upgrade" was a rather
> misleading name

That's definitively the reason for the name.

It's not really important if dist-upgrade and full-upgrade do exactly
the same or not. In practise one works as good as the other.

The "user-friendly" approach to replace several commands by a single
command most likely is the reason for becoming Ubuntu's official tool.

Instead of apt-foo, apt-bar, dpkg or helpers such a gdebi the user just
needs to run apt.

On Sun, 19 May 2019 17:36:05 -0400 (EDT), Robert Heller wrote:
> Arg "user-friendly"... There are different meanings for
> "user-friendly".  *I* don't want a pointy-clicky "user friendly"
> interface -- I do almost ALL of the updates of the various
> Ubuntu/Debian boxen from the command line, often using a *plain* xterm
> over a ssh connection.  I really don't need/want an application to
> demand the use of GUI to do things like display progesss meters or
> other "friendly* eye candy.

apt-get and Co. as well as apt allow to enable and disable exactkly the
same command line eye candy. From command line by the "-o" option and by
the configuration, using things such as APT::Color and
Dpkg::Progress-Fancy::Progress-Bg. Regarding this there is no difference
between using apt-get and Co. or apt.

You still could continue using *plain* xterm over a ssh connection to
run apt, it's not a GUI, it even doesn't enforce a ncurses interface.

Btw. I'm doing almost everything by command line, but with a way more
user-friendly terminal than xterm. I'm using ROXTerm. ROXTerm's user-
friendliness stand out due to usability, not due to an obtrusive anyoing
design, but indeed, ROXTerm supports mouse usage.

Note, ROXTerm is not discontinued, it's actively developed, see
https://github.com/realh/roxterm/commits/master. It's a pity that Ubuntu
dropped it from universe.

As already explained, you could use apt in scripts, too. Several
commands are tricky for different reasons, especially if you write
scripts that should be portable for usage with different distros, "su"
and "sudo" come to mind. apt isn't an exception, the only exception is
the warning message.

The man pages of apt-get and Co. are still required for (expert) usage
of apt, since the only fishy thing about user-friendliness is the
documentation. The documentation shouldn't be to long to read, but also
contain all (expert) features, this is like walking a tightrope,
especially for a command under rapid progress.



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Re: Upgrade problem

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by ubuntu-users mailing list
On Sat, 18 May 2019 at 08:55, Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users
<[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Usually 04 releases are LTS releases

No they are not.

LTS releases come every 2 years.

Only _even numbered years'_ April releases are LTS.

So 18.04 is and 20.04 will be but 2019 is not.

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Re: Upgrade problem

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by Richard Barmann
On Sun, 19 May 2019 at 04:06, Richard Barmann <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I have 19.04. I have 54 upgrades showing in the bottom margin. Update manager says there are no updates. when I go  to Software & updates the third choice "when there are other updates." the choice is blank.

Please bottom-post on the list. Your reply should go _below_ the
trimmed text you are replying to, never above.

Is this comment meant to be part of the current thread to which you
are replying?

If not, do not hijack someone else's thread. Start your own with a new
message to  <[hidden email]>.

If you wish to install updates and they don't appear in the GUI, first
try a reboot. If that doesn't help, use the command line:

sudo apt update
sudo apt full-upgrade -y

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