What's the best way to test mainline Ubuntu without destroying my Kubuntu install?

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
6 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

What's the best way to test mainline Ubuntu without destroying my Kubuntu install?

Christopher Patti
So as I've whinged about extensively here and elsewhere, I had a terrible, terrible time trying and ultimately failing to get Ubuntu 18.04 and then 18.10 running on my Alienware 17 R5.

I eventually settled on Kubuntu which works great.

However, if I could I'd love to be able to be running mainline Ubuntu Gnome, especially with 19.04 coming.

What's the best way for me to test whether that will actually work these days? Is a LiveCD with no installation enough? Clearly a VM isn't the way to go because then you're getting genericized virtual drivers and not the actual stuff you'd get were you to try to run the OS.

So, livecd? Maybe something with containers? What's the best non  destructive way if it's possible at all?

Thanks in advance!
-Chris
(I'm not willing to modify my partition layout or Grub configuration - I do have partition level backup capability but I'm not sure enough of myself to be 100% confident that I could put humpty dumpty back together again when I tried to restore)

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: What's the best way to test mainline Ubuntu without destroying my Kubuntu install?

Colin Law
On Tue, 16 Apr 2019 at 23:11, Christopher Patti <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> So as I've whinged about extensively here and elsewhere, I had a terrible, terrible time trying and ultimately failing to get Ubuntu 18.04 and then 18.10 running on my Alienware 17 R5.
>
> I eventually settled on Kubuntu which works great.
>
> However, if I could I'd love to be able to be running mainline Ubuntu Gnome, especially with 19.04 coming.
>
> What's the best way for me to test whether that will actually work these days? Is a LiveCD with no installation enough? Clearly a VM isn't the way to go because then you're getting genericized virtual drivers and not the actual stuff you'd get were you to try to run the OS.
>
> So, livecd? Maybe something with containers? What's the best non  destructive way if it's possible at all?

Usually a live cd is enough, but to be absolutely certain then make a
new partition on the disk (it only needs to be 10GB if space is an
issue, probably even 5G would be enough to check it works) and install
to that partition.  Then you can dual boot into one or the other.

Colin

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: What's the best way to test mainline Ubuntu without destroying my Kubuntu install?

Christopher Patti
Thanks for your response.

Pardon the stupid question but will that overwrite my current GRUB configuration or simply add a new entry to boot Ubuntu/Gnome?

Or do I tell it to not write GRUB at all and somehow use the BIOS to boot that partition 'manually'?


On Wed, Apr 17, 2019, at 3:45 AM, Colin Law wrote:

> On Tue, 16 Apr 2019 at 23:11, Christopher Patti <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > So as I've whinged about extensively here and elsewhere, I had a terrible, terrible time trying and ultimately failing to get Ubuntu 18.04 and then 18.10 running on my Alienware 17 R5.
> >
> > I eventually settled on Kubuntu which works great.
> >
> > However, if I could I'd love to be able to be running mainline Ubuntu Gnome, especially with 19.04 coming.
> >
> > What's the best way for me to test whether that will actually work these days? Is a LiveCD with no installation enough? Clearly a VM isn't the way to go because then you're getting genericized virtual drivers and not the actual stuff you'd get were you to try to run the OS.
> >
> > So, livecd? Maybe something with containers? What's the best non  destructive way if it's possible at all?
>
> Usually a live cd is enough, but to be absolutely certain then make a
> new partition on the disk (it only needs to be 10GB if space is an
> issue, probably even 5G would be enough to check it works) and install
> to that partition.  Then you can dual boot into one or the other.
>
> Colin
>
> --
> ubuntu-users mailing list
> [hidden email]
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at:
> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: What's the best way to test mainline Ubuntu without destroying my Kubuntu install?

Colin Law
On Wed, 17 Apr 2019 at 17:30, Christopher Patti <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Thanks for your response.
>
> Pardon the stupid question but will that overwrite my current GRUB configuration or simply add a new entry to boot Ubuntu/Gnome?

Not stupid at all.  It will add a new one to the boot list.  The
default will be the new one and the original will be an option.  To
put the default back to the original (with the new one an option) boot
into the original and run
sudo grub-install /dev/sda   # assuming that sda is the boot drive
sudo update-grub


Colin


>
> Or do I tell it to not write GRUB at all and somehow use the BIOS to boot that partition 'manually'?
>
>
> On Wed, Apr 17, 2019, at 3:45 AM, Colin Law wrote:
> > On Tue, 16 Apr 2019 at 23:11, Christopher Patti <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > >
> > > So as I've whinged about extensively here and elsewhere, I had a terrible, terrible time trying and ultimately failing to get Ubuntu 18.04 and then 18.10 running on my Alienware 17 R5.
> > >
> > > I eventually settled on Kubuntu which works great.
> > >
> > > However, if I could I'd love to be able to be running mainline Ubuntu Gnome, especially with 19.04 coming.
> > >
> > > What's the best way for me to test whether that will actually work these days? Is a LiveCD with no installation enough? Clearly a VM isn't the way to go because then you're getting genericized virtual drivers and not the actual stuff you'd get were you to try to run the OS.
> > >
> > > So, livecd? Maybe something with containers? What's the best non  destructive way if it's possible at all?
> >
> > Usually a live cd is enough, but to be absolutely certain then make a
> > new partition on the disk (it only needs to be 10GB if space is an
> > issue, probably even 5G would be enough to check it works) and install
> > to that partition.  Then you can dual boot into one or the other.
> >
> > Colin
> >
> > --
> > ubuntu-users mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > Modify settings or unsubscribe at:
> > https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
> >

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: What's the best way to test mainline Ubuntu without destroying my Kubuntu install?

ubuntu-users mailing list
On Wed, 17 Apr 2019 22:00:45 +0100, Colin Law wrote:

>On Wed, 17 Apr 2019 at 17:30, Christopher Patti <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Pardon the stupid question but will that overwrite my current GRUB
>> configuration or simply add a new entry to boot Ubuntu/Gnome?  
>
>Not stupid at all.  It will add a new one to the boot list.  The
>default will be the new one and the original will be an option.  To
>put the default back to the original (with the new one an option) boot
>into the original and run
>sudo grub-install /dev/sda   # assuming that sda is the boot drive
>sudo update-grub

AFAIK it will not add anything to the grub config of the original
install. AFAIK grub is taken over by the new Ubuntu (flavour) install.
It most likely is possible to chose the original or the new install by
default, but assuming the OP should decide to remove the new install,
there's the need to manually fix grub after removing the new install.


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: What's the best way to test mainline Ubuntu without destroying my Kubuntu install?

ubuntu-users mailing list
On Thu, 18 Apr 2019 11:26:25 +0200, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

>On Wed, 17 Apr 2019 22:00:45 +0100, Colin Law wrote:
>>On Wed, 17 Apr 2019 at 17:30, Christopher Patti <[hidden email]>
>>wrote:  
>>> Pardon the stupid question but will that overwrite my current GRUB
>>> configuration or simply add a new entry to boot Ubuntu/Gnome?    
>>
>>Not stupid at all.  It will add a new one to the boot list.  The
>>default will be the new one and the original will be an option.  To
>>put the default back to the original (with the new one an option) boot
>>into the original and run
>>sudo grub-install /dev/sda   # assuming that sda is the boot drive
>>sudo update-grub

Oops, ok, the above describes the required manual intervention :D.

>AFAIK it will not add anything to the grub config of the original
>install. AFAIK grub is taken over by the new Ubuntu (flavour) install.
>It most likely is possible to chose the original or the new install by
>default, but assuming the OP should decide to remove the new install,
>there's the need to manually fix grub after removing the new install.


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
[hidden email]
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users