[noticia] Fix Ubuntu

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[noticia] Fix Ubuntu

gustavo-48
Caros, leiam a discussão abaixo. Afinal o que é que precisaria ser
"arrumado" no Ubuntu? É que desde a versão 12.10, a Canonical sincroniza as
pesquisas do usuário no Dash com os resultados da Amazon.Ads. Para ter
controle sobre as suas pesquisas no seu próprio sistema, siga as instruções
abaixo:

https://fixubuntu.com

Gustavo

https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/


https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/11/canonical-abused-trademark-law-to-target-a-site-critical-of-ubuntu-privacy/

Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu, has been fending off criticism from privacy
advocates because the desktop search tool in recent versions of the
operating system also searches the Internet. That means if you're searching
your desktop for a file or application, you might also see results from
Amazon<http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/ubuntu-bakes-amazon-search-results-into-os-to-raise-cash/>or
other websites.

One person who dislikes Canonical's search tool is Micah
Lee<https://twitter.com/micahflee>,
a technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation who maintains the
HTTPS Everywhere project and is CTO of the Freedom of the Press
Foundation<https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/about/staff>.
Lee set up a website called "Fix Ubuntu <https://fixubuntu.com/>," which
provides instructions for disabling the Internet search tool.

"If you're an Ubuntu user and you're using the default settings, each time
you start typing in Dash (to open an application or search for a file on
your computer), your search terms get sent to a variety of third parties,
some of which advertise to you," the website says.

According to Lee, Canonical sent him an e-mail this morning asking him to
stop using the Ubuntu logo and also to stop using the word "Ubuntu" in his
domain name. Lee reprinted the entire e-mail in a blog
post<https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/>titled,
"Canonical shouldn’t abuse trademark law to silence critics of its
privacy decisions." The message reads:


Subject: Your Use of Ubuntu
From: ************@canonical.com

Dear Micah,

Canonical Limited (“Canonical”) owns and manages the intellectual property
rights in Ubuntu and other associated intellectual property. In addition,
Canonical is the owner of numerous trademarks and copyright throughout the
world relating to Ubuntu, including Ubuntu logo and the word mark of Ubuntu.

It has been brought to our attention that your website:
https://fixubuntu.com/ is using Canonical’s trademarks including Ubuntu
logo on your website and Ubuntu word in your domain name. The Ubuntu logo
[1] and a screenshot of your website [2] are set out below.

We are really pleased to know your interest in writing about Ubuntu. But
whilst we can appreciate the passion Ubuntu inspires, we also have to be
diligent to ensure that Ubuntu’s trademarks are used correctly.

To keep the balance between the integrity of our trademarks and the ability
to use and promote Ubuntu, we’ve tried to define a reasonable Intellectual
Property Policy. You can read the full policy at
http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy. As you can see from
our policy, to use the Ubuntu trademarks and Ubuntu word in a domain name
would require approval from Canonical.

Unfortunately, in this instance we cannot give you permission to use Ubuntu
trademarks on your website and in your domain name as they may lead to
confusion or the misunderstanding that your website is associated with
Canonical or Ubuntu.

So, whilst we are very happy for you to write about Ubuntu, we request you
to remove Ubuntu word from you domain name and Ubuntu logo from your
website. We would highly appreciate if you could confirm you have done so
by replying this email to us.




To prove its point, the e-mail showed a screenshot of Lee's site with the
Ubuntu logo:

The policy Canonical pointed to does say that permission from the company
is required to use "any Trademark in a domain name or URL or for
merchandising purposes." Lee argued that his use of the Ubuntu logo and the
name in his domain is "nominative
use<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominative_use>"
and thus not a trademark violation. "Although I’m perfectly within my
rights to continue using both, I’ve decided to remove the Ubuntu logo from
the website, but add a disclaimer—because it seems like a nice thing to
do," he wrote. (The EFF, for what it's worth, has published this
list<https://www.eff.org/wp/tips-shutting-down-g>of tips to help
makers of parody sites avoid getting shut down.)

That new disclaimer reads as follows:

Disclaimer: In case you are either 1) a complete idiot; or 2) a lawyer; or
3) both, please be aware that this site is not affiliated with or approved
by Canonical Limited. This site criticizes Canonical for certain
privacy-invading features of Ubuntu and teaches users how to fix them. So,
obviously, the site is not approved by Canonical. And our use of the
trademarked term Ubuntu is plainly descriptive—it helps the public find
this site and understand its message.

His website still has the same domain name that includes the word "Ubuntu."
Canonical doesn't seem to have a problem with other websites using the word
Ubuntu in their domain names, such as "OMG!
Ubuntu!<http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/>,"
a news site that writes enthusiastically about the operating system.

Canonical's registered trademark doesn't specifically mention domain names,
but it claims broad rights over the word Ubuntu for use in
"Telecommunication, communication, and broadcasting services provided
online, via the Internet, or via other communications networks," and
"transmission of information, data, text, images, graphics, sound and/or
audio-visual material online, via the Internet or via other communications
networks."

We've contacted Canonical about the e-mail sent to Lee, but haven't heard
back yet.

While Ubuntu's code is open source and free to everyone, Canonical
obviously hasn't given up its right to enforce its trademarks. Lee argued
that the company's stance against his website "isn't very much in the
spirit of open source," though. The code for Fixubuntu.com is also open
source—Lee invited Canonical to "submit a patch" if it decides to help out
"in a more productive way."

The EFF has already sent a response to Canonical, in a letter from EFF
Staff Attorney Daniel Nazer. "While we appreciate the polite tone of your
letter, we must inform you that your request is not supported by trademark
law and interferes with protected speech," the letter says. "The website
criticizes Canonical Limited for certain features of Ubuntu that Mr. Lee
believes undermine user privacy and teaches users how to fix these
problems. It is well-settled that the First Amendment fully protects the
use of trademarked terms and logos in non-commercial websites that
criticize and comment upon corporations and products. Mr. Lee's site is a
clear example of such protected speech. Neither Mr. Lee, nor any other
member of the public, must seek your permission before engaging in such
constitutionally protected expression."

*UPDATE*: Canonical responded to Ars, providing the following statement:
"To protect the Ubuntu brand, we need to ensure that wherever you see the
Ubuntu logo, it’s an authentic part of the Ubuntu community. We have a
public policy (http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy), which
is open and accessible, and protects the brand. It states where you can
freely use the Ubuntu brand and where a licence is needed. Trademark law
requires us to protect our trademarks, so where needed we will always start
a dialogue to ensure the trademarks are used properly to avoid confusion."
--
Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece

Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
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Re: [noticia] Fix Ubuntu

João Santana
Ainda acho o mesmo que achava antes, que se faz muita tempestade pra uma
coisa fácil de resolver. Ou muda para off o item de configuração ou muda-se
de distribuição.

João Santana
Em 08/11/2013 17:50, "gustavo" <[hidden email]> escreveu:

> Caros, leiam a discussão abaixo. Afinal o que é que precisaria ser
> "arrumado" no Ubuntu? É que desde a versão 12.10, a Canonical sincroniza as
> pesquisas do usuário no Dash com os resultados da Amazon.Ads. Para ter
> controle sobre as suas pesquisas no seu próprio sistema, siga as instruções
> abaixo:
>
> https://fixubuntu.com
>
> Gustavo
>
>
> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/
>
>
>
> https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks
>
>
> http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/11/canonical-abused-trademark-law-to-target-a-site-critical-of-ubuntu-privacy/
>
> Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu, has been fending off criticism from privacy
> advocates because the desktop search tool in recent versions of the
> operating system also searches the Internet. That means if you're searching
> your desktop for a file or application, you might also see results from
> Amazon<
> http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/ubuntu-bakes-amazon-search-results-into-os-to-raise-cash/
> >or
> other websites.
>
> One person who dislikes Canonical's search tool is Micah
> Lee<https://twitter.com/micahflee>,
> a technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation who maintains the
> HTTPS Everywhere project and is CTO of the Freedom of the Press
> Foundation<https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/about/staff>.
> Lee set up a website called "Fix Ubuntu <https://fixubuntu.com/>," which
> provides instructions for disabling the Internet search tool.
>
> "If you're an Ubuntu user and you're using the default settings, each time
> you start typing in Dash (to open an application or search for a file on
> your computer), your search terms get sent to a variety of third parties,
> some of which advertise to you," the website says.
>
> According to Lee, Canonical sent him an e-mail this morning asking him to
> stop using the Ubuntu logo and also to stop using the word "Ubuntu" in his
> domain name. Lee reprinted the entire e-mail in a blog
> post<
> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/
> >titled,
> "Canonical shouldn’t abuse trademark law to silence critics of its
> privacy decisions." The message reads:
>
>
> Subject: Your Use of Ubuntu
> From: ************@canonical.com
>
> Dear Micah,
>
> Canonical Limited (“Canonical”) owns and manages the intellectual property
> rights in Ubuntu and other associated intellectual property. In addition,
> Canonical is the owner of numerous trademarks and copyright throughout the
> world relating to Ubuntu, including Ubuntu logo and the word mark of
> Ubuntu.
>
> It has been brought to our attention that your website:
> https://fixubuntu.com/ is using Canonical’s trademarks including Ubuntu
> logo on your website and Ubuntu word in your domain name. The Ubuntu logo
> [1] and a screenshot of your website [2] are set out below.
>
> We are really pleased to know your interest in writing about Ubuntu. But
> whilst we can appreciate the passion Ubuntu inspires, we also have to be
> diligent to ensure that Ubuntu’s trademarks are used correctly.
>
> To keep the balance between the integrity of our trademarks and the ability
> to use and promote Ubuntu, we’ve tried to define a reasonable Intellectual
> Property Policy. You can read the full policy at
> http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy. As you can see from
> our policy, to use the Ubuntu trademarks and Ubuntu word in a domain name
> would require approval from Canonical.
>
> Unfortunately, in this instance we cannot give you permission to use Ubuntu
> trademarks on your website and in your domain name as they may lead to
> confusion or the misunderstanding that your website is associated with
> Canonical or Ubuntu.
>
> So, whilst we are very happy for you to write about Ubuntu, we request you
> to remove Ubuntu word from you domain name and Ubuntu logo from your
> website. We would highly appreciate if you could confirm you have done so
> by replying this email to us.
>
>
>
>
> To prove its point, the e-mail showed a screenshot of Lee's site with the
> Ubuntu logo:
>
> The policy Canonical pointed to does say that permission from the company
> is required to use "any Trademark in a domain name or URL or for
> merchandising purposes." Lee argued that his use of the Ubuntu logo and the
> name in his domain is "nominative
> use<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominative_use>"
> and thus not a trademark violation. "Although I’m perfectly within my
> rights to continue using both, I’ve decided to remove the Ubuntu logo from
> the website, but add a disclaimer—because it seems like a nice thing to
> do," he wrote. (The EFF, for what it's worth, has published this
> list<https://www.eff.org/wp/tips-shutting-down-g>of tips to help
> makers of parody sites avoid getting shut down.)
>
> That new disclaimer reads as follows:
>
> Disclaimer: In case you are either 1) a complete idiot; or 2) a lawyer; or
> 3) both, please be aware that this site is not affiliated with or approved
> by Canonical Limited. This site criticizes Canonical for certain
> privacy-invading features of Ubuntu and teaches users how to fix them. So,
> obviously, the site is not approved by Canonical. And our use of the
> trademarked term Ubuntu is plainly descriptive—it helps the public find
> this site and understand its message.
>
> His website still has the same domain name that includes the word "Ubuntu."
> Canonical doesn't seem to have a problem with other websites using the word
> Ubuntu in their domain names, such as "OMG!
> Ubuntu!<http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/>,"
> a news site that writes enthusiastically about the operating system.
>
> Canonical's registered trademark doesn't specifically mention domain names,
> but it claims broad rights over the word Ubuntu for use in
> "Telecommunication, communication, and broadcasting services provided
> online, via the Internet, or via other communications networks," and
> "transmission of information, data, text, images, graphics, sound and/or
> audio-visual material online, via the Internet or via other communications
> networks."
>
> We've contacted Canonical about the e-mail sent to Lee, but haven't heard
> back yet.
>
> While Ubuntu's code is open source and free to everyone, Canonical
> obviously hasn't given up its right to enforce its trademarks. Lee argued
> that the company's stance against his website "isn't very much in the
> spirit of open source," though. The code for Fixubuntu.com is also open
> source—Lee invited Canonical to "submit a patch" if it decides to help out
> "in a more productive way."
>
> The EFF has already sent a response to Canonical, in a letter from EFF
> Staff Attorney Daniel Nazer. "While we appreciate the polite tone of your
> letter, we must inform you that your request is not supported by trademark
> law and interferes with protected speech," the letter says. "The website
> criticizes Canonical Limited for certain features of Ubuntu that Mr. Lee
> believes undermine user privacy and teaches users how to fix these
> problems. It is well-settled that the First Amendment fully protects the
> use of trademarked terms and logos in non-commercial websites that
> criticize and comment upon corporations and products. Mr. Lee's site is a
> clear example of such protected speech. Neither Mr. Lee, nor any other
> member of the public, must seek your permission before engaging in such
> constitutionally protected expression."
>
> *UPDATE*: Canonical responded to Ars, providing the following statement:
> "To protect the Ubuntu brand, we need to ensure that wherever you see the
> Ubuntu logo, it’s an authentic part of the Ubuntu community. We have a
> public policy (http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy),
> which
> is open and accessible, and protects the brand. It states where you can
> freely use the Ubuntu brand and where a licence is needed. Trademark law
> requires us to protect our trademarks, so where needed we will always start
> a dialogue to ensure the trademarks are used properly to avoid confusion."
> --
> Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
>
> Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
> Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
>
--
Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece

Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
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Re: [noticia] Fix Ubuntu

Fábio Lima
Pelo que me consta, no google, facebook e etc. é até pior. Vamos todos
instalar servidores caseiros movidos a distros que não instalam spyware????

Não é cinismo nem postura "é assim mesmo, vamos nos conformar". É enxergar
as coisas no tamanho que elas tem. É perfeitamente possível desabilitar o
recurso, o software é livre e auditável e sempre podemos mudar, caso não
desejemos o recurso (que com certeza é útil pra muita gente).


2013/11/8 João Santana <[hidden email]>

> Ainda acho o mesmo que achava antes, que se faz muita tempestade pra uma
> coisa fácil de resolver. Ou muda para off o item de configuração ou muda-se
> de distribuição.
>
> João Santana
> Em 08/11/2013 17:50, "gustavo" <[hidden email]> escreveu:
>
> > Caros, leiam a discussão abaixo. Afinal o que é que precisaria ser
> > "arrumado" no Ubuntu? É que desde a versão 12.10, a Canonical sincroniza
> as
> > pesquisas do usuário no Dash com os resultados da Amazon.Ads. Para ter
> > controle sobre as suas pesquisas no seu próprio sistema, siga as
> instruções
> > abaixo:
> >
> > https://fixubuntu.com
> >
> > Gustavo
> >
> >
> >
> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/
> >
> >
> >
> >
> https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks
> >
> >
> >
> http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/11/canonical-abused-trademark-law-to-target-a-site-critical-of-ubuntu-privacy/
> >
> > Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu, has been fending off criticism from
> privacy
> > advocates because the desktop search tool in recent versions of the
> > operating system also searches the Internet. That means if you're
> searching
> > your desktop for a file or application, you might also see results from
> > Amazon<
> >
> http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/ubuntu-bakes-amazon-search-results-into-os-to-raise-cash/
> > >or
> > other websites.
> >
> > One person who dislikes Canonical's search tool is Micah
> > Lee<https://twitter.com/micahflee>,
> > a technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation who maintains the
> > HTTPS Everywhere project and is CTO of the Freedom of the Press
> > Foundation<https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/about/staff>.
> > Lee set up a website called "Fix Ubuntu <https://fixubuntu.com/>," which
> > provides instructions for disabling the Internet search tool.
> >
> > "If you're an Ubuntu user and you're using the default settings, each
> time
> > you start typing in Dash (to open an application or search for a file on
> > your computer), your search terms get sent to a variety of third parties,
> > some of which advertise to you," the website says.
> >
> > According to Lee, Canonical sent him an e-mail this morning asking him to
> > stop using the Ubuntu logo and also to stop using the word "Ubuntu" in
> his
> > domain name. Lee reprinted the entire e-mail in a blog
> > post<
> >
> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/
> > >titled,
> > "Canonical shouldn’t abuse trademark law to silence critics of its
> > privacy decisions." The message reads:
> >
> >
> > Subject: Your Use of Ubuntu
> > From: ************@canonical.com
> >
> > Dear Micah,
> >
> > Canonical Limited (“Canonical”) owns and manages the intellectual
> property
> > rights in Ubuntu and other associated intellectual property. In addition,
> > Canonical is the owner of numerous trademarks and copyright throughout
> the
> > world relating to Ubuntu, including Ubuntu logo and the word mark of
> > Ubuntu.
> >
> > It has been brought to our attention that your website:
> > https://fixubuntu.com/ is using Canonical’s trademarks including Ubuntu
> > logo on your website and Ubuntu word in your domain name. The Ubuntu logo
> > [1] and a screenshot of your website [2] are set out below.
> >
> > We are really pleased to know your interest in writing about Ubuntu. But
> > whilst we can appreciate the passion Ubuntu inspires, we also have to be
> > diligent to ensure that Ubuntu’s trademarks are used correctly.
> >
> > To keep the balance between the integrity of our trademarks and the
> ability
> > to use and promote Ubuntu, we’ve tried to define a reasonable
> Intellectual
> > Property Policy. You can read the full policy at
> > http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy. As you can see
> from
> > our policy, to use the Ubuntu trademarks and Ubuntu word in a domain name
> > would require approval from Canonical.
> >
> > Unfortunately, in this instance we cannot give you permission to use
> Ubuntu
> > trademarks on your website and in your domain name as they may lead to
> > confusion or the misunderstanding that your website is associated with
> > Canonical or Ubuntu.
> >
> > So, whilst we are very happy for you to write about Ubuntu, we request
> you
> > to remove Ubuntu word from you domain name and Ubuntu logo from your
> > website. We would highly appreciate if you could confirm you have done so
> > by replying this email to us.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > To prove its point, the e-mail showed a screenshot of Lee's site with the
> > Ubuntu logo:
> >
> > The policy Canonical pointed to does say that permission from the company
> > is required to use "any Trademark in a domain name or URL or for
> > merchandising purposes." Lee argued that his use of the Ubuntu logo and
> the
> > name in his domain is "nominative
> > use<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominative_use>"
> > and thus not a trademark violation. "Although I’m perfectly within my
> > rights to continue using both, I’ve decided to remove the Ubuntu logo
> from
> > the website, but add a disclaimer—because it seems like a nice thing to
> > do," he wrote. (The EFF, for what it's worth, has published this
> > list<https://www.eff.org/wp/tips-shutting-down-g>of tips to help
> > makers of parody sites avoid getting shut down.)
> >
> > That new disclaimer reads as follows:
> >
> > Disclaimer: In case you are either 1) a complete idiot; or 2) a lawyer;
> or
> > 3) both, please be aware that this site is not affiliated with or
> approved
> > by Canonical Limited. This site criticizes Canonical for certain
> > privacy-invading features of Ubuntu and teaches users how to fix them.
> So,
> > obviously, the site is not approved by Canonical. And our use of the
> > trademarked term Ubuntu is plainly descriptive—it helps the public find
> > this site and understand its message.
> >
> > His website still has the same domain name that includes the word
> "Ubuntu."
> > Canonical doesn't seem to have a problem with other websites using the
> word
> > Ubuntu in their domain names, such as "OMG!
> > Ubuntu!<http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/>,"
> > a news site that writes enthusiastically about the operating system.
> >
> > Canonical's registered trademark doesn't specifically mention domain
> names,
> > but it claims broad rights over the word Ubuntu for use in
> > "Telecommunication, communication, and broadcasting services provided
> > online, via the Internet, or via other communications networks," and
> > "transmission of information, data, text, images, graphics, sound and/or
> > audio-visual material online, via the Internet or via other
> communications
> > networks."
> >
> > We've contacted Canonical about the e-mail sent to Lee, but haven't heard
> > back yet.
> >
> > While Ubuntu's code is open source and free to everyone, Canonical
> > obviously hasn't given up its right to enforce its trademarks. Lee argued
> > that the company's stance against his website "isn't very much in the
> > spirit of open source," though. The code for Fixubuntu.com is also open
> > source—Lee invited Canonical to "submit a patch" if it decides to help
> out
> > "in a more productive way."
> >
> > The EFF has already sent a response to Canonical, in a letter from EFF
> > Staff Attorney Daniel Nazer. "While we appreciate the polite tone of your
> > letter, we must inform you that your request is not supported by
> trademark
> > law and interferes with protected speech," the letter says. "The website
> > criticizes Canonical Limited for certain features of Ubuntu that Mr. Lee
> > believes undermine user privacy and teaches users how to fix these
> > problems. It is well-settled that the First Amendment fully protects the
> > use of trademarked terms and logos in non-commercial websites that
> > criticize and comment upon corporations and products. Mr. Lee's site is a
> > clear example of such protected speech. Neither Mr. Lee, nor any other
> > member of the public, must seek your permission before engaging in such
> > constitutionally protected expression."
> >
> > *UPDATE*: Canonical responded to Ars, providing the following statement:
> > "To protect the Ubuntu brand, we need to ensure that wherever you see the
> > Ubuntu logo, it’s an authentic part of the Ubuntu community. We have a
> > public policy (http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy),
> > which
> > is open and accessible, and protects the brand. It states where you can
> > freely use the Ubuntu brand and where a licence is needed. Trademark law
> > requires us to protect our trademarks, so where needed we will always
> start
> > a dialogue to ensure the trademarks are used properly to avoid
> confusion."
> > --
> > Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
> >
> > Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
> > Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
> > https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
> >
> --
> Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
>
> Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
> Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
>



--
---------------------------------------------------
Fábio Lima ([hidden email])
--
Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece

Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
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Re: [noticia] Fix Ubuntu

gustavo-48
>Ou muda para off o item de configuração ou muda-se
de distribuição.
A Canonical fez uma decisão que afeta a privacidade de milhões de usuários.
Se o usuário quisesse, ele instalaria. Simples assim. O "Ame-o ou deixo-o"
é uma postura politicamente inábil.

>Pelo que me consta, no google, facebook e etc. é até pior.
Sim, mas uma coisa são sites que você pode ou não visitar, e outra é um
spyware inserido num sistema operacional GNU/Linux.

Ainda há um terceiro elemento que é a utilização da lei de propriedade
intelectual e representante paralegal para silenciar um crítico a política
de privacidade do Ubuntu. Conforme disse anteriormente, vale ler o post do
Micah Lee explicando a história.


On Fri, Nov 8, 2013 at 7:53 PM, Fábio Lima <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Pelo que me consta, no google, facebook e etc. é até pior. Vamos todos
> instalar servidores caseiros movidos a distros que não instalam spyware????
>
> Não é cinismo nem postura "é assim mesmo, vamos nos conformar". É enxergar
> as coisas no tamanho que elas tem. É perfeitamente possível desabilitar o
> recurso, o software é livre e auditável e sempre podemos mudar, caso não
> desejemos o recurso (que com certeza é útil pra muita gente).
>
>
> 2013/11/8 João Santana <[hidden email]>
>
> > Ainda acho o mesmo que achava antes, que se faz muita tempestade pra uma
> > coisa fácil de resolver. Ou muda para off o item de configuração ou
> muda-se
> > de distribuição.
> >
> > João Santana
> > Em 08/11/2013 17:50, "gustavo" <[hidden email]> escreveu:
> >
> > > Caros, leiam a discussão abaixo. Afinal o que é que precisaria ser
> > > "arrumado" no Ubuntu? É que desde a versão 12.10, a Canonical
> sincroniza
> > as
> > > pesquisas do usuário no Dash com os resultados da Amazon.Ads. Para ter
> > > controle sobre as suas pesquisas no seu próprio sistema, siga as
> > instruções
> > > abaixo:
> > >
> > > https://fixubuntu.com
> > >
> > > Gustavo
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/11/canonical-abused-trademark-law-to-target-a-site-critical-of-ubuntu-privacy/
> > >
> > > Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu, has been fending off criticism from
> > privacy
> > > advocates because the desktop search tool in recent versions of the
> > > operating system also searches the Internet. That means if you're
> > searching
> > > your desktop for a file or application, you might also see results from
> > > Amazon<
> > >
> >
> http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/ubuntu-bakes-amazon-search-results-into-os-to-raise-cash/
> > > >or
> > > other websites.
> > >
> > > One person who dislikes Canonical's search tool is Micah
> > > Lee<https://twitter.com/micahflee>,
> > > a technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation who maintains the
> > > HTTPS Everywhere project and is CTO of the Freedom of the Press
> > > Foundation<https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/about/staff>.
> > > Lee set up a website called "Fix Ubuntu <https://fixubuntu.com/>,"
> which
> > > provides instructions for disabling the Internet search tool.
> > >
> > > "If you're an Ubuntu user and you're using the default settings, each
> > time
> > > you start typing in Dash (to open an application or search for a file
> on
> > > your computer), your search terms get sent to a variety of third
> parties,
> > > some of which advertise to you," the website says.
> > >
> > > According to Lee, Canonical sent him an e-mail this morning asking him
> to
> > > stop using the Ubuntu logo and also to stop using the word "Ubuntu" in
> > his
> > > domain name. Lee reprinted the entire e-mail in a blog
> > > post<
> > >
> >
> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/
> > > >titled,
> > > "Canonical shouldn’t abuse trademark law to silence critics of its
> > > privacy decisions." The message reads:
> > >
> > >
> > > Subject: Your Use of Ubuntu
> > > From: ************@canonical.com
> > >
> > > Dear Micah,
> > >
> > > Canonical Limited (“Canonical”) owns and manages the intellectual
> > property
> > > rights in Ubuntu and other associated intellectual property. In
> addition,
> > > Canonical is the owner of numerous trademarks and copyright throughout
> > the
> > > world relating to Ubuntu, including Ubuntu logo and the word mark of
> > > Ubuntu.
> > >
> > > It has been brought to our attention that your website:
> > > https://fixubuntu.com/ is using Canonical’s trademarks including
> Ubuntu
> > > logo on your website and Ubuntu word in your domain name. The Ubuntu
> logo
> > > [1] and a screenshot of your website [2] are set out below.
> > >
> > > We are really pleased to know your interest in writing about Ubuntu.
> But
> > > whilst we can appreciate the passion Ubuntu inspires, we also have to
> be
> > > diligent to ensure that Ubuntu’s trademarks are used correctly.
> > >
> > > To keep the balance between the integrity of our trademarks and the
> > ability
> > > to use and promote Ubuntu, we’ve tried to define a reasonable
> > Intellectual
> > > Property Policy. You can read the full policy at
> > > http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy. As you can see
> > from
> > > our policy, to use the Ubuntu trademarks and Ubuntu word in a domain
> name
> > > would require approval from Canonical.
> > >
> > > Unfortunately, in this instance we cannot give you permission to use
> > Ubuntu
> > > trademarks on your website and in your domain name as they may lead to
> > > confusion or the misunderstanding that your website is associated with
> > > Canonical or Ubuntu.
> > >
> > > So, whilst we are very happy for you to write about Ubuntu, we request
> > you
> > > to remove Ubuntu word from you domain name and Ubuntu logo from your
> > > website. We would highly appreciate if you could confirm you have done
> so
> > > by replying this email to us.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > To prove its point, the e-mail showed a screenshot of Lee's site with
> the
> > > Ubuntu logo:
> > >
> > > The policy Canonical pointed to does say that permission from the
> company
> > > is required to use "any Trademark in a domain name or URL or for
> > > merchandising purposes." Lee argued that his use of the Ubuntu logo and
> > the
> > > name in his domain is "nominative
> > > use<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominative_use>"
> > > and thus not a trademark violation. "Although I’m perfectly within my
> > > rights to continue using both, I’ve decided to remove the Ubuntu logo
> > from
> > > the website, but add a disclaimer—because it seems like a nice thing to
> > > do," he wrote. (The EFF, for what it's worth, has published this
> > > list<https://www.eff.org/wp/tips-shutting-down-g>of tips to help
> > > makers of parody sites avoid getting shut down.)
> > >
> > > That new disclaimer reads as follows:
> > >
> > > Disclaimer: In case you are either 1) a complete idiot; or 2) a lawyer;
> > or
> > > 3) both, please be aware that this site is not affiliated with or
> > approved
> > > by Canonical Limited. This site criticizes Canonical for certain
> > > privacy-invading features of Ubuntu and teaches users how to fix them.
> > So,
> > > obviously, the site is not approved by Canonical. And our use of the
> > > trademarked term Ubuntu is plainly descriptive—it helps the public find
> > > this site and understand its message.
> > >
> > > His website still has the same domain name that includes the word
> > "Ubuntu."
> > > Canonical doesn't seem to have a problem with other websites using the
> > word
> > > Ubuntu in their domain names, such as "OMG!
> > > Ubuntu!<http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/>,"
> > > a news site that writes enthusiastically about the operating system.
> > >
> > > Canonical's registered trademark doesn't specifically mention domain
> > names,
> > > but it claims broad rights over the word Ubuntu for use in
> > > "Telecommunication, communication, and broadcasting services provided
> > > online, via the Internet, or via other communications networks," and
> > > "transmission of information, data, text, images, graphics, sound
> and/or
> > > audio-visual material online, via the Internet or via other
> > communications
> > > networks."
> > >
> > > We've contacted Canonical about the e-mail sent to Lee, but haven't
> heard
> > > back yet.
> > >
> > > While Ubuntu's code is open source and free to everyone, Canonical
> > > obviously hasn't given up its right to enforce its trademarks. Lee
> argued
> > > that the company's stance against his website "isn't very much in the
> > > spirit of open source," though. The code for Fixubuntu.com is also open
> > > source—Lee invited Canonical to "submit a patch" if it decides to help
> > out
> > > "in a more productive way."
> > >
> > > The EFF has already sent a response to Canonical, in a letter from EFF
> > > Staff Attorney Daniel Nazer. "While we appreciate the polite tone of
> your
> > > letter, we must inform you that your request is not supported by
> > trademark
> > > law and interferes with protected speech," the letter says. "The
> website
> > > criticizes Canonical Limited for certain features of Ubuntu that Mr.
> Lee
> > > believes undermine user privacy and teaches users how to fix these
> > > problems. It is well-settled that the First Amendment fully protects
> the
> > > use of trademarked terms and logos in non-commercial websites that
> > > criticize and comment upon corporations and products. Mr. Lee's site
> is a
> > > clear example of such protected speech. Neither Mr. Lee, nor any other
> > > member of the public, must seek your permission before engaging in such
> > > constitutionally protected expression."
> > >
> > > *UPDATE*: Canonical responded to Ars, providing the following
> statement:
> > > "To protect the Ubuntu brand, we need to ensure that wherever you see
> the
> > > Ubuntu logo, it’s an authentic part of the Ubuntu community. We have a
> > > public policy (http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy),
> > > which
> > > is open and accessible, and protects the brand. It states where you can
> > > freely use the Ubuntu brand and where a licence is needed. Trademark
> law
> > > requires us to protect our trademarks, so where needed we will always
> > start
> > > a dialogue to ensure the trademarks are used properly to avoid
> > confusion."
> > > --
> > > Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
> > >
> > > Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
> > > Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
> > > https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
> > >
> > --
> > Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
> >
> > Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
> > Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
> > https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
> >
>
>
>
> --
> ---------------------------------------------------
> Fábio Lima ([hidden email])
> --
> Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
>
> Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
> Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
>
--
Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece

Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
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Re: [noticia] Fix Ubuntu

Fábio Lima
Pode até não visitar, mas visita. E visitando, não pode escapar da
vigilância já que a configuração é inacessível. Quanto ao SO, você pode há
maneiras de desabilitar o recurso, vida configurações de privacidade. E o
tal do site fix ubuntu ofereceu uma técnica pra ir ainda mais fundo.

Quanto à tal polêmica, bem a princípio é lamentável mesmo. Mas a minha
experiência anterior com casos similares anteriores é ter um pouco de
cautela com acusações incendiárias porque não conhecemos a história
anterior antes do capítulo anterior e cada um conta a parte da história que
melhor atende suas intenções. Mas que fique claro que não estou
justificando ou algo assim. Apenas sou prudente porque já vi trocentos
casos de acusações incendiárias que se mostraram maliciosas. A imprensa
nacional ta cheia desses casos.

__________________________________
Fábio Lima ([hidden email])
Em 09/11/2013 01:38, "gustavo" <[hidden email]> escreveu:

> >Ou muda para off o item de configuração ou muda-se
> de distribuição.
> A Canonical fez uma decisão que afeta a privacidade de milhões de usuários.
> Se o usuário quisesse, ele instalaria. Simples assim. O "Ame-o ou deixo-o"
> é uma postura politicamente inábil.
>
> >Pelo que me consta, no google, facebook e etc. é até pior.
> Sim, mas uma coisa são sites que você pode ou não visitar, e outra é um
> spyware inserido num sistema operacional GNU/Linux.
>
> Ainda há um terceiro elemento que é a utilização da lei de propriedade
> intelectual e representante paralegal para silenciar um crítico a política
> de privacidade do Ubuntu. Conforme disse anteriormente, vale ler o post do
> Micah Lee explicando a história.
>
>
> On Fri, Nov 8, 2013 at 7:53 PM, Fábio Lima <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > Pelo que me consta, no google, facebook e etc. é até pior. Vamos todos
> > instalar servidores caseiros movidos a distros que não instalam
> spyware????
> >
> > Não é cinismo nem postura "é assim mesmo, vamos nos conformar". É
> enxergar
> > as coisas no tamanho que elas tem. É perfeitamente possível desabilitar o
> > recurso, o software é livre e auditável e sempre podemos mudar, caso não
> > desejemos o recurso (que com certeza é útil pra muita gente).
> >
> >
> > 2013/11/8 João Santana <[hidden email]>
> >
> > > Ainda acho o mesmo que achava antes, que se faz muita tempestade pra
> uma
> > > coisa fácil de resolver. Ou muda para off o item de configuração ou
> > muda-se
> > > de distribuição.
> > >
> > > João Santana
> > > Em 08/11/2013 17:50, "gustavo" <[hidden email]> escreveu:
> > >
> > > > Caros, leiam a discussão abaixo. Afinal o que é que precisaria ser
> > > > "arrumado" no Ubuntu? É que desde a versão 12.10, a Canonical
> > sincroniza
> > > as
> > > > pesquisas do usuário no Dash com os resultados da Amazon.Ads. Para
> ter
> > > > controle sobre as suas pesquisas no seu próprio sistema, siga as
> > > instruções
> > > > abaixo:
> > > >
> > > > https://fixubuntu.com
> > > >
> > > > Gustavo
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> >
> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> >
> https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> >
> http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/11/canonical-abused-trademark-law-to-target-a-site-critical-of-ubuntu-privacy/
> > > >
> > > > Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu, has been fending off criticism from
> > > privacy
> > > > advocates because the desktop search tool in recent versions of the
> > > > operating system also searches the Internet. That means if you're
> > > searching
> > > > your desktop for a file or application, you might also see results
> from
> > > > Amazon<
> > > >
> > >
> >
> http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/ubuntu-bakes-amazon-search-results-into-os-to-raise-cash/
> > > > >or
> > > > other websites.
> > > >
> > > > One person who dislikes Canonical's search tool is Micah
> > > > Lee<https://twitter.com/micahflee>,
> > > > a technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation who maintains
> the
> > > > HTTPS Everywhere project and is CTO of the Freedom of the Press
> > > > Foundation<https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/about/staff>.
> > > > Lee set up a website called "Fix Ubuntu <https://fixubuntu.com/>,"
> > which
> > > > provides instructions for disabling the Internet search tool.
> > > >
> > > > "If you're an Ubuntu user and you're using the default settings, each
> > > time
> > > > you start typing in Dash (to open an application or search for a file
> > on
> > > > your computer), your search terms get sent to a variety of third
> > parties,
> > > > some of which advertise to you," the website says.
> > > >
> > > > According to Lee, Canonical sent him an e-mail this morning asking
> him
> > to
> > > > stop using the Ubuntu logo and also to stop using the word "Ubuntu"
> in
> > > his
> > > > domain name. Lee reprinted the entire e-mail in a blog
> > > > post<
> > > >
> > >
> >
> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/
> > > > >titled,
> > > > "Canonical shouldn’t abuse trademark law to silence critics of its
> > > > privacy decisions." The message reads:
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Subject: Your Use of Ubuntu
> > > > From: ************@canonical.com
> > > >
> > > > Dear Micah,
> > > >
> > > > Canonical Limited (“Canonical”) owns and manages the intellectual
> > > property
> > > > rights in Ubuntu and other associated intellectual property. In
> > addition,
> > > > Canonical is the owner of numerous trademarks and copyright
> throughout
> > > the
> > > > world relating to Ubuntu, including Ubuntu logo and the word mark of
> > > > Ubuntu.
> > > >
> > > > It has been brought to our attention that your website:
> > > > https://fixubuntu.com/ is using Canonical’s trademarks including
> > Ubuntu
> > > > logo on your website and Ubuntu word in your domain name. The Ubuntu
> > logo
> > > > [1] and a screenshot of your website [2] are set out below.
> > > >
> > > > We are really pleased to know your interest in writing about Ubuntu.
> > But
> > > > whilst we can appreciate the passion Ubuntu inspires, we also have to
> > be
> > > > diligent to ensure that Ubuntu’s trademarks are used correctly.
> > > >
> > > > To keep the balance between the integrity of our trademarks and the
> > > ability
> > > > to use and promote Ubuntu, we’ve tried to define a reasonable
> > > Intellectual
> > > > Property Policy. You can read the full policy at
> > > > http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy. As you can
> see
> > > from
> > > > our policy, to use the Ubuntu trademarks and Ubuntu word in a domain
> > name
> > > > would require approval from Canonical.
> > > >
> > > > Unfortunately, in this instance we cannot give you permission to use
> > > Ubuntu
> > > > trademarks on your website and in your domain name as they may lead
> to
> > > > confusion or the misunderstanding that your website is associated
> with
> > > > Canonical or Ubuntu.
> > > >
> > > > So, whilst we are very happy for you to write about Ubuntu, we
> request
> > > you
> > > > to remove Ubuntu word from you domain name and Ubuntu logo from your
> > > > website. We would highly appreciate if you could confirm you have
> done
> > so
> > > > by replying this email to us.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > To prove its point, the e-mail showed a screenshot of Lee's site with
> > the
> > > > Ubuntu logo:
> > > >
> > > > The policy Canonical pointed to does say that permission from the
> > company
> > > > is required to use "any Trademark in a domain name or URL or for
> > > > merchandising purposes." Lee argued that his use of the Ubuntu logo
> and
> > > the
> > > > name in his domain is "nominative
> > > > use<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominative_use>"
> > > > and thus not a trademark violation. "Although I’m perfectly within my
> > > > rights to continue using both, I’ve decided to remove the Ubuntu logo
> > > from
> > > > the website, but add a disclaimer—because it seems like a nice thing
> to
> > > > do," he wrote. (The EFF, for what it's worth, has published this
> > > > list<https://www.eff.org/wp/tips-shutting-down-g>of tips to help
> > > > makers of parody sites avoid getting shut down.)
> > > >
> > > > That new disclaimer reads as follows:
> > > >
> > > > Disclaimer: In case you are either 1) a complete idiot; or 2) a
> lawyer;
> > > or
> > > > 3) both, please be aware that this site is not affiliated with or
> > > approved
> > > > by Canonical Limited. This site criticizes Canonical for certain
> > > > privacy-invading features of Ubuntu and teaches users how to fix
> them.
> > > So,
> > > > obviously, the site is not approved by Canonical. And our use of the
> > > > trademarked term Ubuntu is plainly descriptive—it helps the public
> find
> > > > this site and understand its message.
> > > >
> > > > His website still has the same domain name that includes the word
> > > "Ubuntu."
> > > > Canonical doesn't seem to have a problem with other websites using
> the
> > > word
> > > > Ubuntu in their domain names, such as "OMG!
> > > > Ubuntu!<http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/>,"
> > > > a news site that writes enthusiastically about the operating system.
> > > >
> > > > Canonical's registered trademark doesn't specifically mention domain
> > > names,
> > > > but it claims broad rights over the word Ubuntu for use in
> > > > "Telecommunication, communication, and broadcasting services provided
> > > > online, via the Internet, or via other communications networks," and
> > > > "transmission of information, data, text, images, graphics, sound
> > and/or
> > > > audio-visual material online, via the Internet or via other
> > > communications
> > > > networks."
> > > >
> > > > We've contacted Canonical about the e-mail sent to Lee, but haven't
> > heard
> > > > back yet.
> > > >
> > > > While Ubuntu's code is open source and free to everyone, Canonical
> > > > obviously hasn't given up its right to enforce its trademarks. Lee
> > argued
> > > > that the company's stance against his website "isn't very much in the
> > > > spirit of open source," though. The code for Fixubuntu.com is also
> open
> > > > source—Lee invited Canonical to "submit a patch" if it decides to
> help
> > > out
> > > > "in a more productive way."
> > > >
> > > > The EFF has already sent a response to Canonical, in a letter from
> EFF
> > > > Staff Attorney Daniel Nazer. "While we appreciate the polite tone of
> > your
> > > > letter, we must inform you that your request is not supported by
> > > trademark
> > > > law and interferes with protected speech," the letter says. "The
> > website
> > > > criticizes Canonical Limited for certain features of Ubuntu that Mr.
> > Lee
> > > > believes undermine user privacy and teaches users how to fix these
> > > > problems. It is well-settled that the First Amendment fully protects
> > the
> > > > use of trademarked terms and logos in non-commercial websites that
> > > > criticize and comment upon corporations and products. Mr. Lee's site
> > is a
> > > > clear example of such protected speech. Neither Mr. Lee, nor any
> other
> > > > member of the public, must seek your permission before engaging in
> such
> > > > constitutionally protected expression."
> > > >
> > > > *UPDATE*: Canonical responded to Ars, providing the following
> > statement:
> > > > "To protect the Ubuntu brand, we need to ensure that wherever you see
> > the
> > > > Ubuntu logo, it’s an authentic part of the Ubuntu community. We have
> a
> > > > public policy (http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy
> ),
> > > > which
> > > > is open and accessible, and protects the brand. It states where you
> can
> > > > freely use the Ubuntu brand and where a licence is needed. Trademark
> > law
> > > > requires us to protect our trademarks, so where needed we will always
> > > start
> > > > a dialogue to ensure the trademarks are used properly to avoid
> > > confusion."
> > > > --
> > > > Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
> > > >
> > > > Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
> > > > Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
> > > > https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
> > > >
> > > --
> > > Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
> > >
> > > Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
> > > Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
> > > https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > ---------------------------------------------------
> > Fábio Lima ([hidden email])
> > --
> > Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
> >
> > Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
> > Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
> > https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
> >
> --
> Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
>
> Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
> Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
>
--
Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece

Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
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Re: [noticia] Fix Ubuntu

João Santana
In reply to this post by gustavo-48
2013/11/9 gustavo <[hidden email]>

> >Ou muda para off o item de configuração ou muda-se
> de distribuição.
> A Canonical fez uma decisão que afeta a privacidade de milhões de usuários.
> Se o usuário quisesse, ele instalaria. Simples assim. O "Ame-o ou deixo-o"
> é uma postura politicamente inábil.
>
>
Talvez na política, entre projetos de SL/CA é assim que funciona.

Porque algumas pessoas não concordavam com o desenvolvimento do KDE surgiu
o GNOME.
Porque algumas pessoas discordaram da direção (ou falta dela) do OpenOffice
criou-se o LibreOffice.
Porque se queria uma implementação 100% livre do Java veio o OpenJDK.
Porque se sentiu a falta de recursos no Blackbox que se criaram diversos
*box.

E assim por diante.

Não é porque determinado projeto possui um recurso que eu discordo que eu
tenho que ficar fazendo beiço até que o removam porque é o melhor para
milhões de pessoas blablabla. Não há nada mais invasivo à privacidade do
que um espertofone, mas ninguém esperneia contra eles, ou quer trocar um
Samsung S4 por um Motorola PT-550.

 E sem fanboyismo, que a Canonical não paga as minhas contas, o que a
Canonical faz não é nada diferente do que uma empresa faz. Somos
constantemente avaliados em nossas compras, atividades em rede (e não falo
apenas de rede como a internet), sobre o que assistimos, o que comentamos,
etc. e tal. É assim que empresas segmentam seus clientes, e é assim que,
quando se faz um busca se encontra o tal produto mais barato do que no
concorrente. Isso é ruim? Não sei. Só sei que, se não quero ser usado como
estatística comportamental, ou eu deixo de comprar (mudo para off) ou vou
comprar num lugar que não me avalia (mudo de distribuição).

[SNIP]


--

Com meus melhores cumprimentos,

João Santana
--
Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece

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Re: [noticia] Fix Ubuntu

gmail-3
In reply to this post by Fábio Lima

         legal, estamos aqui torcendo pelo melhor, quanto a nos falarmos
virtualmente.... hummmm é meio loteria mas possível...vamos ver,
prefiro, por enquanto, não prometer...

Em 08-11-2013 19:53, Fábio Lima escreveu:

> Pelo que me consta, no google, facebook e etc. é até pior. Vamos todos
> instalar servidores caseiros movidos a distros que não instalam spyware????
>
> Não é cinismo nem postura "é assim mesmo, vamos nos conformar". É enxergar
> as coisas no tamanho que elas tem. É perfeitamente possível desabilitar o
> recurso, o software é livre e auditável e sempre podemos mudar, caso não
> desejemos o recurso (que com certeza é útil pra muita gente).
>
>
> 2013/11/8 João Santana <[hidden email]>
>
>> Ainda acho o mesmo que achava antes, que se faz muita tempestade pra uma
>> coisa fácil de resolver. Ou muda para off o item de configuração ou muda-se
>> de distribuição.
>>
>> João Santana
>> Em 08/11/2013 17:50, "gustavo" <[hidden email]> escreveu:
>>
>>> Caros, leiam a discussão abaixo. Afinal o que é que precisaria ser
>>> "arrumado" no Ubuntu? É que desde a versão 12.10, a Canonical sincroniza
>> as
>>> pesquisas do usuário no Dash com os resultados da Amazon.Ads. Para ter
>>> controle sobre as suas pesquisas no seu próprio sistema, siga as
>> instruções
>>> abaixo:
>>>
>>> https://fixubuntu.com
>>>
>>> Gustavo
>>>
>>>
>>>
>> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>> https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks
>>>
>>>
>> http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/11/canonical-abused-trademark-law-to-target-a-site-critical-of-ubuntu-privacy/
>>> Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu, has been fending off criticism from
>> privacy
>>> advocates because the desktop search tool in recent versions of the
>>> operating system also searches the Internet. That means if you're
>> searching
>>> your desktop for a file or application, you might also see results from
>>> Amazon<
>>>
>> http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/ubuntu-bakes-amazon-search-results-into-os-to-raise-cash/
>>>> or
>>> other websites.
>>>
>>> One person who dislikes Canonical's search tool is Micah
>>> Lee<https://twitter.com/micahflee>,
>>> a technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation who maintains the
>>> HTTPS Everywhere project and is CTO of the Freedom of the Press
>>> Foundation<https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/about/staff>.
>>> Lee set up a website called "Fix Ubuntu <https://fixubuntu.com/>," which
>>> provides instructions for disabling the Internet search tool.
>>>
>>> "If you're an Ubuntu user and you're using the default settings, each
>> time
>>> you start typing in Dash (to open an application or search for a file on
>>> your computer), your search terms get sent to a variety of third parties,
>>> some of which advertise to you," the website says.
>>>
>>> According to Lee, Canonical sent him an e-mail this morning asking him to
>>> stop using the Ubuntu logo and also to stop using the word "Ubuntu" in
>> his
>>> domain name. Lee reprinted the entire e-mail in a blog
>>> post<
>>>
>> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/
>>>> titled,
>>> "Canonical shouldn’t abuse trademark law to silence critics of its
>>> privacy decisions." The message reads:
>>>
>>>
>>> Subject: Your Use of Ubuntu
>>> From: ************@canonical.com
>>>
>>> Dear Micah,
>>>
>>> Canonical Limited (“Canonical”) owns and manages the intellectual
>> property
>>> rights in Ubuntu and other associated intellectual property. In addition,
>>> Canonical is the owner of numerous trademarks and copyright throughout
>> the
>>> world relating to Ubuntu, including Ubuntu logo and the word mark of
>>> Ubuntu.
>>>
>>> It has been brought to our attention that your website:
>>> https://fixubuntu.com/ is using Canonical’s trademarks including Ubuntu
>>> logo on your website and Ubuntu word in your domain name. The Ubuntu logo
>>> [1] and a screenshot of your website [2] are set out below.
>>>
>>> We are really pleased to know your interest in writing about Ubuntu. But
>>> whilst we can appreciate the passion Ubuntu inspires, we also have to be
>>> diligent to ensure that Ubuntu’s trademarks are used correctly.
>>>
>>> To keep the balance between the integrity of our trademarks and the
>> ability
>>> to use and promote Ubuntu, we’ve tried to define a reasonable
>> Intellectual
>>> Property Policy. You can read the full policy at
>>> http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy. As you can see
>> from
>>> our policy, to use the Ubuntu trademarks and Ubuntu word in a domain name
>>> would require approval from Canonical.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately, in this instance we cannot give you permission to use
>> Ubuntu
>>> trademarks on your website and in your domain name as they may lead to
>>> confusion or the misunderstanding that your website is associated with
>>> Canonical or Ubuntu.
>>>
>>> So, whilst we are very happy for you to write about Ubuntu, we request
>> you
>>> to remove Ubuntu word from you domain name and Ubuntu logo from your
>>> website. We would highly appreciate if you could confirm you have done so
>>> by replying this email to us.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> To prove its point, the e-mail showed a screenshot of Lee's site with the
>>> Ubuntu logo:
>>>
>>> The policy Canonical pointed to does say that permission from the company
>>> is required to use "any Trademark in a domain name or URL or for
>>> merchandising purposes." Lee argued that his use of the Ubuntu logo and
>> the
>>> name in his domain is "nominative
>>> use<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominative_use>"
>>> and thus not a trademark violation. "Although I’m perfectly within my
>>> rights to continue using both, I’ve decided to remove the Ubuntu logo
>> from
>>> the website, but add a disclaimer—because it seems like a nice thing to
>>> do," he wrote. (The EFF, for what it's worth, has published this
>>> list<https://www.eff.org/wp/tips-shutting-down-g>of tips to help
>>> makers of parody sites avoid getting shut down.)
>>>
>>> That new disclaimer reads as follows:
>>>
>>> Disclaimer: In case you are either 1) a complete idiot; or 2) a lawyer;
>> or
>>> 3) both, please be aware that this site is not affiliated with or
>> approved
>>> by Canonical Limited. This site criticizes Canonical for certain
>>> privacy-invading features of Ubuntu and teaches users how to fix them.
>> So,
>>> obviously, the site is not approved by Canonical. And our use of the
>>> trademarked term Ubuntu is plainly descriptive—it helps the public find
>>> this site and understand its message.
>>>
>>> His website still has the same domain name that includes the word
>> "Ubuntu."
>>> Canonical doesn't seem to have a problem with other websites using the
>> word
>>> Ubuntu in their domain names, such as "OMG!
>>> Ubuntu!<http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/>,"
>>> a news site that writes enthusiastically about the operating system.
>>>
>>> Canonical's registered trademark doesn't specifically mention domain
>> names,
>>> but it claims broad rights over the word Ubuntu for use in
>>> "Telecommunication, communication, and broadcasting services provided
>>> online, via the Internet, or via other communications networks," and
>>> "transmission of information, data, text, images, graphics, sound and/or
>>> audio-visual material online, via the Internet or via other
>> communications
>>> networks."
>>>
>>> We've contacted Canonical about the e-mail sent to Lee, but haven't heard
>>> back yet.
>>>
>>> While Ubuntu's code is open source and free to everyone, Canonical
>>> obviously hasn't given up its right to enforce its trademarks. Lee argued
>>> that the company's stance against his website "isn't very much in the
>>> spirit of open source," though. The code for Fixubuntu.com is also open
>>> source—Lee invited Canonical to "submit a patch" if it decides to help
>> out
>>> "in a more productive way."
>>>
>>> The EFF has already sent a response to Canonical, in a letter from EFF
>>> Staff Attorney Daniel Nazer. "While we appreciate the polite tone of your
>>> letter, we must inform you that your request is not supported by
>> trademark
>>> law and interferes with protected speech," the letter says. "The website
>>> criticizes Canonical Limited for certain features of Ubuntu that Mr. Lee
>>> believes undermine user privacy and teaches users how to fix these
>>> problems. It is well-settled that the First Amendment fully protects the
>>> use of trademarked terms and logos in non-commercial websites that
>>> criticize and comment upon corporations and products. Mr. Lee's site is a
>>> clear example of such protected speech. Neither Mr. Lee, nor any other
>>> member of the public, must seek your permission before engaging in such
>>> constitutionally protected expression."
>>>
>>> *UPDATE*: Canonical responded to Ars, providing the following statement:
>>> "To protect the Ubuntu brand, we need to ensure that wherever you see the
>>> Ubuntu logo, it’s an authentic part of the Ubuntu community. We have a
>>> public policy (http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy),
>>> which
>>> is open and accessible, and protects the brand. It states where you can
>>> freely use the Ubuntu brand and where a licence is needed. Trademark law
>>> requires us to protect our trademarks, so where needed we will always
>> start
>>> a dialogue to ensure the trademarks are used properly to avoid
>> confusion."
>>> --
>>> Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
>>>
>>> Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
>>> Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
>>> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
>>>
>> --
>> Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
>>
>> Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
>> Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
>> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
>>
>
>


--
Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece

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Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
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Re: [noticia] Fix Ubuntu

gmail-3

                 foi mal pessoal, resposta para destinatário errado...
desculpem-me...

Em 09-11-2013 22:29, mario / gmail escreveu:

>
>         legal, estamos aqui torcendo pelo melhor, quanto a nos
> falarmos virtualmente.... hummmm é meio loteria mas possível...vamos
> ver, prefiro, por enquanto, não prometer...
>
> Em 08-11-2013 19:53, Fábio Lima escreveu:
>> Pelo que me consta, no google, facebook e etc. é até pior. Vamos todos
>> instalar servidores caseiros movidos a distros que não instalam
>> spyware????
>>
>> Não é cinismo nem postura "é assim mesmo, vamos nos conformar". É
>> enxergar
>> as coisas no tamanho que elas tem. É perfeitamente possível
>> desabilitar o
>> recurso, o software é livre e auditável e sempre podemos mudar, caso não
>> desejemos o recurso (que com certeza é útil pra muita gente).
>>
>>
>> 2013/11/8 João Santana <[hidden email]>
>>
>>> Ainda acho o mesmo que achava antes, que se faz muita tempestade pra
>>> uma
>>> coisa fácil de resolver. Ou muda para off o item de configuração ou
>>> muda-se
>>> de distribuição.
>>>
>>> João Santana
>>> Em 08/11/2013 17:50, "gustavo" <[hidden email]> escreveu:
>>>
>>>> Caros, leiam a discussão abaixo. Afinal o que é que precisaria ser
>>>> "arrumado" no Ubuntu? É que desde a versão 12.10, a Canonical
>>>> sincroniza
>>> as
>>>> pesquisas do usuário no Dash com os resultados da Amazon.Ads. Para ter
>>>> controle sobre as suas pesquisas no seu próprio sistema, siga as
>>> instruções
>>>> abaixo:
>>>>
>>>> https://fixubuntu.com
>>>>
>>>> Gustavo
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/ 
>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>> https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks 
>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>> http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/11/canonical-abused-trademark-law-to-target-a-site-critical-of-ubuntu-privacy/ 
>>>
>>>> Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu, has been fending off criticism from
>>> privacy
>>>> advocates because the desktop search tool in recent versions of the
>>>> operating system also searches the Internet. That means if you're
>>> searching
>>>> your desktop for a file or application, you might also see results
>>>> from
>>>> Amazon<
>>>>
>>> http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/ubuntu-bakes-amazon-search-results-into-os-to-raise-cash/ 
>>>
>>>>> or
>>>> other websites.
>>>>
>>>> One person who dislikes Canonical's search tool is Micah
>>>> Lee<https://twitter.com/micahflee>,
>>>> a technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation who maintains the
>>>> HTTPS Everywhere project and is CTO of the Freedom of the Press
>>>> Foundation<https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/about/staff>.
>>>> Lee set up a website called "Fix Ubuntu <https://fixubuntu.com/>,"
>>>> which
>>>> provides instructions for disabling the Internet search tool.
>>>>
>>>> "If you're an Ubuntu user and you're using the default settings, each
>>> time
>>>> you start typing in Dash (to open an application or search for a
>>>> file on
>>>> your computer), your search terms get sent to a variety of third
>>>> parties,
>>>> some of which advertise to you," the website says.
>>>>
>>>> According to Lee, Canonical sent him an e-mail this morning asking
>>>> him to
>>>> stop using the Ubuntu logo and also to stop using the word "Ubuntu" in
>>> his
>>>> domain name. Lee reprinted the entire e-mail in a blog
>>>> post<
>>>>
>>> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/ 
>>>
>>>>> titled,
>>>> "Canonical shouldn’t abuse trademark law to silence critics of its
>>>> privacy decisions." The message reads:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Subject: Your Use of Ubuntu
>>>> From: ************@canonical.com
>>>>
>>>> Dear Micah,
>>>>
>>>> Canonical Limited (“Canonical”) owns and manages the intellectual
>>> property
>>>> rights in Ubuntu and other associated intellectual property. In
>>>> addition,
>>>> Canonical is the owner of numerous trademarks and copyright throughout
>>> the
>>>> world relating to Ubuntu, including Ubuntu logo and the word mark of
>>>> Ubuntu.
>>>>
>>>> It has been brought to our attention that your website:
>>>> https://fixubuntu.com/ is using Canonical’s trademarks including
>>>> Ubuntu
>>>> logo on your website and Ubuntu word in your domain name. The
>>>> Ubuntu logo
>>>> [1] and a screenshot of your website [2] are set out below.
>>>>
>>>> We are really pleased to know your interest in writing about
>>>> Ubuntu. But
>>>> whilst we can appreciate the passion Ubuntu inspires, we also have
>>>> to be
>>>> diligent to ensure that Ubuntu’s trademarks are used correctly.
>>>>
>>>> To keep the balance between the integrity of our trademarks and the
>>> ability
>>>> to use and promote Ubuntu, we’ve tried to define a reasonable
>>> Intellectual
>>>> Property Policy. You can read the full policy at
>>>> http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy. As you can see
>>> from
>>>> our policy, to use the Ubuntu trademarks and Ubuntu word in a
>>>> domain name
>>>> would require approval from Canonical.
>>>>
>>>> Unfortunately, in this instance we cannot give you permission to use
>>> Ubuntu
>>>> trademarks on your website and in your domain name as they may lead to
>>>> confusion or the misunderstanding that your website is associated with
>>>> Canonical or Ubuntu.
>>>>
>>>> So, whilst we are very happy for you to write about Ubuntu, we request
>>> you
>>>> to remove Ubuntu word from you domain name and Ubuntu logo from your
>>>> website. We would highly appreciate if you could confirm you have
>>>> done so
>>>> by replying this email to us.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> To prove its point, the e-mail showed a screenshot of Lee's site
>>>> with the
>>>> Ubuntu logo:
>>>>
>>>> The policy Canonical pointed to does say that permission from the
>>>> company
>>>> is required to use "any Trademark in a domain name or URL or for
>>>> merchandising purposes." Lee argued that his use of the Ubuntu logo
>>>> and
>>> the
>>>> name in his domain is "nominative
>>>> use<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominative_use>"
>>>> and thus not a trademark violation. "Although I’m perfectly within my
>>>> rights to continue using both, I’ve decided to remove the Ubuntu logo
>>> from
>>>> the website, but add a disclaimer—because it seems like a nice
>>>> thing to
>>>> do," he wrote. (The EFF, for what it's worth, has published this
>>>> list<https://www.eff.org/wp/tips-shutting-down-g>of tips to help
>>>> makers of parody sites avoid getting shut down.)
>>>>
>>>> That new disclaimer reads as follows:
>>>>
>>>> Disclaimer: In case you are either 1) a complete idiot; or 2) a
>>>> lawyer;
>>> or
>>>> 3) both, please be aware that this site is not affiliated with or
>>> approved
>>>> by Canonical Limited. This site criticizes Canonical for certain
>>>> privacy-invading features of Ubuntu and teaches users how to fix them.
>>> So,
>>>> obviously, the site is not approved by Canonical. And our use of the
>>>> trademarked term Ubuntu is plainly descriptive—it helps the public
>>>> find
>>>> this site and understand its message.
>>>>
>>>> His website still has the same domain name that includes the word
>>> "Ubuntu."
>>>> Canonical doesn't seem to have a problem with other websites using the
>>> word
>>>> Ubuntu in their domain names, such as "OMG!
>>>> Ubuntu!<http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/>,"
>>>> a news site that writes enthusiastically about the operating system.
>>>>
>>>> Canonical's registered trademark doesn't specifically mention domain
>>> names,
>>>> but it claims broad rights over the word Ubuntu for use in
>>>> "Telecommunication, communication, and broadcasting services provided
>>>> online, via the Internet, or via other communications networks," and
>>>> "transmission of information, data, text, images, graphics, sound
>>>> and/or
>>>> audio-visual material online, via the Internet or via other
>>> communications
>>>> networks."
>>>>
>>>> We've contacted Canonical about the e-mail sent to Lee, but haven't
>>>> heard
>>>> back yet.
>>>>
>>>> While Ubuntu's code is open source and free to everyone, Canonical
>>>> obviously hasn't given up its right to enforce its trademarks. Lee
>>>> argued
>>>> that the company's stance against his website "isn't very much in the
>>>> spirit of open source," though. The code for Fixubuntu.com is also
>>>> open
>>>> source—Lee invited Canonical to "submit a patch" if it decides to help
>>> out
>>>> "in a more productive way."
>>>>
>>>> The EFF has already sent a response to Canonical, in a letter from EFF
>>>> Staff Attorney Daniel Nazer. "While we appreciate the polite tone
>>>> of your
>>>> letter, we must inform you that your request is not supported by
>>> trademark
>>>> law and interferes with protected speech," the letter says. "The
>>>> website
>>>> criticizes Canonical Limited for certain features of Ubuntu that
>>>> Mr. Lee
>>>> believes undermine user privacy and teaches users how to fix these
>>>> problems. It is well-settled that the First Amendment fully
>>>> protects the
>>>> use of trademarked terms and logos in non-commercial websites that
>>>> criticize and comment upon corporations and products. Mr. Lee's
>>>> site is a
>>>> clear example of such protected speech. Neither Mr. Lee, nor any other
>>>> member of the public, must seek your permission before engaging in
>>>> such
>>>> constitutionally protected expression."
>>>>
>>>> *UPDATE*: Canonical responded to Ars, providing the following
>>>> statement:
>>>> "To protect the Ubuntu brand, we need to ensure that wherever you
>>>> see the
>>>> Ubuntu logo, it’s an authentic part of the Ubuntu community. We have a
>>>> public policy (http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy),
>>>> which
>>>> is open and accessible, and protects the brand. It states where you
>>>> can
>>>> freely use the Ubuntu brand and where a licence is needed.
>>>> Trademark law
>>>> requires us to protect our trademarks, so where needed we will always
>>> start
>>>> a dialogue to ensure the trademarks are used properly to avoid
>>> confusion."
>>>> --
>>>> Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
>>>>
>>>> Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
>>>> Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
>>>> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
>>>>
>>> --
>>> Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
>>>
>>> Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
>>> Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
>>> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
>>>
>>
>>
>


--
Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece

Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
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Re: [noticia] Fix Ubuntu

Pogorelsky
In reply to this post by gmail-3
A Canonical ganha um trocado nessa história, deveriamos dar uma força e
deixar habilitado.


Jack Pogorelsky Junior
*Engº Mecânico (CREA-RS 136845)*
Tel: +55 (51) 8124-8132
E-mail: [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
Site: http://www.pogorelsky.net
Blog: http://www.pogorelsky.net/blog


Em 09-11-2013 22:29, mario / gmail escreveu:

>
>         legal, estamos aqui torcendo pelo melhor, quanto a nos
> falarmos virtualmente.... hummmm é meio loteria mas possível...vamos
> ver, prefiro, por enquanto, não prometer...
>
> Em 08-11-2013 19:53, Fábio Lima escreveu:
>> Pelo que me consta, no google, facebook e etc. é até pior. Vamos todos
>> instalar servidores caseiros movidos a distros que não instalam
>> spyware????
>>
>> Não é cinismo nem postura "é assim mesmo, vamos nos conformar". É
>> enxergar
>> as coisas no tamanho que elas tem. É perfeitamente possível
>> desabilitar o
>> recurso, o software é livre e auditável e sempre podemos mudar, caso não
>> desejemos o recurso (que com certeza é útil pra muita gente).
>>
>>
>> 2013/11/8 João Santana <[hidden email]>
>>
>>> Ainda acho o mesmo que achava antes, que se faz muita tempestade pra
>>> uma
>>> coisa fácil de resolver. Ou muda para off o item de configuração ou
>>> muda-se
>>> de distribuição.
>>>
>>> João Santana
>>> Em 08/11/2013 17:50, "gustavo" <[hidden email]> escreveu:
>>>
>>>> Caros, leiam a discussão abaixo. Afinal o que é que precisaria ser
>>>> "arrumado" no Ubuntu? É que desde a versão 12.10, a Canonical
>>>> sincroniza
>>> as
>>>> pesquisas do usuário no Dash com os resultados da Amazon.Ads. Para ter
>>>> controle sobre as suas pesquisas no seu próprio sistema, siga as
>>> instruções
>>>> abaixo:
>>>>
>>>> https://fixubuntu.com
>>>>
>>>> Gustavo
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/ 
>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>> https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks 
>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>> http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/11/canonical-abused-trademark-law-to-target-a-site-critical-of-ubuntu-privacy/ 
>>>
>>>> Canonical, the maker of Ubuntu, has been fending off criticism from
>>> privacy
>>>> advocates because the desktop search tool in recent versions of the
>>>> operating system also searches the Internet. That means if you're
>>> searching
>>>> your desktop for a file or application, you might also see results
>>>> from
>>>> Amazon<
>>>>
>>> http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/ubuntu-bakes-amazon-search-results-into-os-to-raise-cash/ 
>>>
>>>>> or
>>>> other websites.
>>>>
>>>> One person who dislikes Canonical's search tool is Micah
>>>> Lee<https://twitter.com/micahflee>,
>>>> a technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation who maintains the
>>>> HTTPS Everywhere project and is CTO of the Freedom of the Press
>>>> Foundation<https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/about/staff>.
>>>> Lee set up a website called "Fix Ubuntu <https://fixubuntu.com/>,"
>>>> which
>>>> provides instructions for disabling the Internet search tool.
>>>>
>>>> "If you're an Ubuntu user and you're using the default settings, each
>>> time
>>>> you start typing in Dash (to open an application or search for a
>>>> file on
>>>> your computer), your search terms get sent to a variety of third
>>>> parties,
>>>> some of which advertise to you," the website says.
>>>>
>>>> According to Lee, Canonical sent him an e-mail this morning asking
>>>> him to
>>>> stop using the Ubuntu logo and also to stop using the word "Ubuntu" in
>>> his
>>>> domain name. Lee reprinted the entire e-mail in a blog
>>>> post<
>>>>
>>> https://micahflee.com/2013/11/canonical-shouldnt-abuse-trademark-law-to-silence-critics-of-its-privacy-decisions/ 
>>>
>>>>> titled,
>>>> "Canonical shouldn’t abuse trademark law to silence critics of its
>>>> privacy decisions." The message reads:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Subject: Your Use of Ubuntu
>>>> From: ************@canonical.com
>>>>
>>>> Dear Micah,
>>>>
>>>> Canonical Limited (“Canonical”) owns and manages the intellectual
>>> property
>>>> rights in Ubuntu and other associated intellectual property. In
>>>> addition,
>>>> Canonical is the owner of numerous trademarks and copyright throughout
>>> the
>>>> world relating to Ubuntu, including Ubuntu logo and the word mark of
>>>> Ubuntu.
>>>>
>>>> It has been brought to our attention that your website:
>>>> https://fixubuntu.com/ is using Canonical’s trademarks including
>>>> Ubuntu
>>>> logo on your website and Ubuntu word in your domain name. The
>>>> Ubuntu logo
>>>> [1] and a screenshot of your website [2] are set out below.
>>>>
>>>> We are really pleased to know your interest in writing about
>>>> Ubuntu. But
>>>> whilst we can appreciate the passion Ubuntu inspires, we also have
>>>> to be
>>>> diligent to ensure that Ubuntu’s trademarks are used correctly.
>>>>
>>>> To keep the balance between the integrity of our trademarks and the
>>> ability
>>>> to use and promote Ubuntu, we’ve tried to define a reasonable
>>> Intellectual
>>>> Property Policy. You can read the full policy at
>>>> http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy. As you can see
>>> from
>>>> our policy, to use the Ubuntu trademarks and Ubuntu word in a
>>>> domain name
>>>> would require approval from Canonical.
>>>>
>>>> Unfortunately, in this instance we cannot give you permission to use
>>> Ubuntu
>>>> trademarks on your website and in your domain name as they may lead to
>>>> confusion or the misunderstanding that your website is associated with
>>>> Canonical or Ubuntu.
>>>>
>>>> So, whilst we are very happy for you to write about Ubuntu, we request
>>> you
>>>> to remove Ubuntu word from you domain name and Ubuntu logo from your
>>>> website. We would highly appreciate if you could confirm you have
>>>> done so
>>>> by replying this email to us.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> To prove its point, the e-mail showed a screenshot of Lee's site
>>>> with the
>>>> Ubuntu logo:
>>>>
>>>> The policy Canonical pointed to does say that permission from the
>>>> company
>>>> is required to use "any Trademark in a domain name or URL or for
>>>> merchandising purposes." Lee argued that his use of the Ubuntu logo
>>>> and
>>> the
>>>> name in his domain is "nominative
>>>> use<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominative_use>"
>>>> and thus not a trademark violation. "Although I’m perfectly within my
>>>> rights to continue using both, I’ve decided to remove the Ubuntu logo
>>> from
>>>> the website, but add a disclaimer—because it seems like a nice
>>>> thing to
>>>> do," he wrote. (The EFF, for what it's worth, has published this
>>>> list<https://www.eff.org/wp/tips-shutting-down-g>of tips to help
>>>> makers of parody sites avoid getting shut down.)
>>>>
>>>> That new disclaimer reads as follows:
>>>>
>>>> Disclaimer: In case you are either 1) a complete idiot; or 2) a
>>>> lawyer;
>>> or
>>>> 3) both, please be aware that this site is not affiliated with or
>>> approved
>>>> by Canonical Limited. This site criticizes Canonical for certain
>>>> privacy-invading features of Ubuntu and teaches users how to fix them.
>>> So,
>>>> obviously, the site is not approved by Canonical. And our use of the
>>>> trademarked term Ubuntu is plainly descriptive—it helps the public
>>>> find
>>>> this site and understand its message.
>>>>
>>>> His website still has the same domain name that includes the word
>>> "Ubuntu."
>>>> Canonical doesn't seem to have a problem with other websites using the
>>> word
>>>> Ubuntu in their domain names, such as "OMG!
>>>> Ubuntu!<http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/>,"
>>>> a news site that writes enthusiastically about the operating system.
>>>>
>>>> Canonical's registered trademark doesn't specifically mention domain
>>> names,
>>>> but it claims broad rights over the word Ubuntu for use in
>>>> "Telecommunication, communication, and broadcasting services provided
>>>> online, via the Internet, or via other communications networks," and
>>>> "transmission of information, data, text, images, graphics, sound
>>>> and/or
>>>> audio-visual material online, via the Internet or via other
>>> communications
>>>> networks."
>>>>
>>>> We've contacted Canonical about the e-mail sent to Lee, but haven't
>>>> heard
>>>> back yet.
>>>>
>>>> While Ubuntu's code is open source and free to everyone, Canonical
>>>> obviously hasn't given up its right to enforce its trademarks. Lee
>>>> argued
>>>> that the company's stance against his website "isn't very much in the
>>>> spirit of open source," though. The code for Fixubuntu.com is also
>>>> open
>>>> source—Lee invited Canonical to "submit a patch" if it decides to help
>>> out
>>>> "in a more productive way."
>>>>
>>>> The EFF has already sent a response to Canonical, in a letter from EFF
>>>> Staff Attorney Daniel Nazer. "While we appreciate the polite tone
>>>> of your
>>>> letter, we must inform you that your request is not supported by
>>> trademark
>>>> law and interferes with protected speech," the letter says. "The
>>>> website
>>>> criticizes Canonical Limited for certain features of Ubuntu that
>>>> Mr. Lee
>>>> believes undermine user privacy and teaches users how to fix these
>>>> problems. It is well-settled that the First Amendment fully
>>>> protects the
>>>> use of trademarked terms and logos in non-commercial websites that
>>>> criticize and comment upon corporations and products. Mr. Lee's
>>>> site is a
>>>> clear example of such protected speech. Neither Mr. Lee, nor any other
>>>> member of the public, must seek your permission before engaging in
>>>> such
>>>> constitutionally protected expression."
>>>>
>>>> *UPDATE*: Canonical responded to Ars, providing the following
>>>> statement:
>>>> "To protect the Ubuntu brand, we need to ensure that wherever you
>>>> see the
>>>> Ubuntu logo, it’s an authentic part of the Ubuntu community. We have a
>>>> public policy (http://www.canonical.com/intellectual-property-policy),
>>>> which
>>>> is open and accessible, and protects the brand. It states where you
>>>> can
>>>> freely use the Ubuntu brand and where a licence is needed.
>>>> Trademark law
>>>> requires us to protect our trademarks, so where needed we will always
>>> start
>>>> a dialogue to ensure the trademarks are used properly to avoid
>>> confusion."
>>>> --
>>>> Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
>>>>
>>>> Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
>>>> Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
>>>> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
>>>>
>>> --
>>> Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece
>>>
>>> Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
>>> Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
>>> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br
>>>
>>
>>
>
>


--
Mais sobre o Ubuntu em português: http://www.ubuntu-br.org/comece

Lista de discussão Ubuntu Brasil
Histórico, descadastramento e outras opções:
https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-br