resolv.conf questions

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Re: resolv.conf questions

Chris Green
> your LAN will use.  This is often 198.168.1.1 but certainly not

Oops!  That should be 192.168.1.1 of course.

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Re: resolv.conf questions

Tomas Zubiri
Dear Ubuntu developers, /etc/ files are user interfaces, stop breaking them.

Thank you very much.

Tomas Zubiri
Software Developer
Cel: +54 911 5891 8239



On Thu, Aug 8, 2019 at 3:32 PM Chris Green <[hidden email]> wrote:
> your LAN will use.  This is often 198.168.1.1 but certainly not

Oops!  That should be 192.168.1.1 of course.

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Re: resolv.conf questions

Paul Smith-2
On Thu, 2019-08-08 at 17:49 -0300, Tomas Zubiri wrote:
> https://askubuntu.com/questions/662863/manually-edit-dns-in-ubuntu-14-04
>
> Dear Ubuntu developers, /etc/ files are user interfaces, stop
> breaking them.

This is too simple unfortunately.

Back in the mists of time, /etc/resolv.conf was a user-modifiable file
and when you set up a new system (typically the size of a room, or a
large table, or even a big suitcase that sat under your desk) you'd
edit this file by hand to set your DNS server.  And it virtually never
changed, so it was fine.

Then we started to deploy large numbers of systems and we wanted a
centralized way to manage this info (along with IP addresses etc.)  So
DHCP was born, and now systems asked out on the network for a server to
provide these details.  No longer were these files expected to be
edited manually.  This was 30+ years ago, mind you!

Maybe, back when DHCP started, we should have addressed this problem.
Maybe the C resolver should have been changed to look for
/etc/resolv.conf and if it didn't exist, it would look somewhere else
for a dynamically created file.  But we didn't.

These days it's even more complicated: not only do we have desktops but
laptops, which can switch IP addresses and DNS servers by walking from
one side of a room to another.  Plus we have VPNs, where there are DNS
servers that you want to ask for systems you can access over the VPN,
and other DNS servers you want to ask about systems on your local
network, and potentially other servers you can ask about google.com
etc.

So there are various ways to manage it.  In fact I agree there are _too
many_ ways, and the one that seems to be "winning" (systemd-resolved)
has serious (IME) deficiencies.  I wish we'd stopped at "run a local
dnsmasq server" because that worked just fine.

If you want to go back to the days when you hand-edited your
resolv.conf file you can do that by disabling all the extra features.
But I sincerely doubt many people (especially people using laptops)
want to do that.


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Re: resolv.conf questions

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by Tomas Zubiri
On Thu, 8 Aug 2019 at 22:53, Tomas Zubiri <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> https://askubuntu.com/questions/662863/manually-edit-dns-in-ubuntu-14-04
>
> Dear Ubuntu developers, /etc/ files are user interfaces, stop breaking them.
>
> Thank you very much.

Please bottom-post on mailing lists.

Sadly, though, I have to disagree.

Linux is big business now. Mostly on servers.

The only significant user-facing ones are Android and ChromeOS, which
are both dramatically constrained systems, which is part of why
they've been successful. It is taking desktop distro vendors *way* too
long to catch up with what they are doing, but distros like Endless,
and to a lesser extent Fedora Silverblue, are showing the way:
* all apps containerised; no inter-app dependencies at all
* OS image shipped as a complete, tested image
* Most of the filesystem is read-only
* no package manager, no end-user ability to install/remove/update
packages. You get a whole new OS image periodically, like on a phone.
* OS updates are transactional: it deploys the whole thing, and if it
doesn't work, it rolls back the entire OS to the last known good
snapshot. 2+ OS snapshots are maintained at any time so there should
always be a good one.

This is a good thing. Software bloat is vast now. OSes are too complex
for most people to understand, maintain, or fix. So you don't. Even
the ability is removed.

This is in parallel with server deployments:
* everything is virtualised: OSes only run in VMs with standardised
hardware, the network connections are virtualised, the disks are
virtualised.
*  VMs are built from templates and deployed automatically as needed,
and destroyed again as needed.
* there is as little as possible local state in any VM. It gets its
state info automatically from a database over the network. The
database is in a VM too, of course.
* as few local config files as possible; config is kept in a database
too and pushed out to local database instances

I could go on.

Unix is a late-1960s OS designed for late-1960s minicomputers:
* big standalone non-networkerd servers with lots of small disks,
shared by multiple interactive users on dumb text terminals
* users built their own software from source
* everything is a text file. Editors and piping are key tools.

With some 1970s tech on top that the industry spent 25 years getting
working stably:
* framebuffers and hi-res graphic displays are possible but very expensive
* so, design for graphical terminals, or micros that are dedicated
display servers
* programs run over the network, executing on 1 machine, displaying on another
* Ethernet networking has been bolted on. TCP/IP is the main protocol.
* because GUIs and networking are add-ons, they break the "everything
is a file" model. This is ignored. Editors etc do not allow for it yet
alone use it.
* machines treat one another as hostile. There is no federation, no
process migration, etc.

Then in the 1980s this moribund minicomputer OS got a 2nd lease of
life and started selling well because microcomputers  got powerful
enough to run it, growing up into expensive high-power workstations:
* some effort at network integration: tools were bolted on top for
distributing text-only config files automatically, machines could
query each other to find resources
* encryption was added for moving stuff over untrusted networks
* a lot of focus on powerful programming tools and things like maths
tools, 3D modelling tools
* very little focus on user-friendliness or ease of use, as that
sector was dominated by Macs, Amigas etc.
* much of this stuff is proprietary because of the nature of the business model.
* server support is half-hearted as there are dedicated server OSes for that

In the 1990s things changed again:
* plain cheap PCs became powerful enough to run Unix usefully
* the existing vendors flailed around trying to sell it but mostly
failed as they kept their very expensive pricing models from the
workstation era
* FOSS re-implementations replace it, piggybacking on tech developed for Windows
* After about 1½ decades of work, the leading FOSS *nix becomes a
usable desktop OS. Linux wins. FreeBSD trails, but has some good work
-- much of this goes into Mac OS X

Early 21st century:
* high-speed Internet access can be assumed
* non-technical end-users become a primary "market"
* now it runs on local 64-bit multi-CPU micros with essentially infinite disk
* it has a local 3D accelerator for a display

Results...
* traditional troubleshooting/fault finding is obsolete. No need for
keeping admin tools separate from user tools, no need for /bin and
/sbin, /usr/bin and /usr/sbin, etc. Boot off a DVD or a USB, recover
user data if any, nuke the OS and reload.
* GUIs favour 3D chrome. When harmony is achieved & everyone
standardises on GNOME 2, Microsoft attacks it and destroys it,
resulting in vast duplication of desktop functionality and a huge
amount of wasted effort.
* Because of poor app portability between distros, just like in the
days of proprietary Unix, only a few big-name apps exist for all
distros.
* Linux is mainly only usable for Web/email/chat/simple office stuff,
and traditional coder work. Windows and Mac hoover up all of the
rich-local-apps market, including games. Linux vendors do not even
notice.
* Linux on conventional desktops/laptops is weak, but that market is
shrinking fast. But...
* not-really-Linux-any-more phone/tablet OSes are thriving
* consumer Internet use is huge, for content consumption, social
networking, and retail

This drives a need for vast server farms, with the lowest possible
unit software cost.
* tools for automation -- for deployment, management, scaling -- are big money
* because the job market is huge, skill levels are relatively low, so
automated distribution of workloads is key:
- tools for deploying & re-deploying VM images automatically in case
of failure of the contained app
- tools for large teams to interwork on incremental, iterative
software development
- bolting together existing components, automated building and testing
and packaging and deployment
* as the only significant successful end-user apps are web browsers,
all tools move onto the web platform:
- web mail
- web chat
- web media
- web file storage
- web config management
* Result: tooling written in Web tools -- JavaScript -- displaying
over Web UIs (browser rendering engines)
* On the server end, inefficiency can be solved by deploying more
servers. They're cheap, the software is free.
* On the client end, most focus is on fast browsers and using games
acceleration hardware to deliver fast web browsing, media playback,
and hardware accelerated UI

So the only possible method of fighting back and trying to deliver
improved end-user tooling for power users is to use a mixture of web
tools and games hardware.

Result: OSes that need 3D OpenGL compositing, with desktops and apps
written in JavaScript, and packaging and deployment methods taken from
those designed for huge server farms.

* GNOME 3 and Cinnamon, and a distant 3rd, KDE. (The only others are
principally defined by refusal to conform.)
* Flatpak, Snappy and a distant 3rd, Appimage
* systemd and an increasing move away from text files, including for
config and logging -- server farm tools use database connections,
because in the 1980s & 1990s, nobody saw any reason to try to copy
Microsoft's LAN Manager, domains, Novell NDS, Banyan VINES' Streetalk,
or any other more sophisticated LAN management tools.

Gosh. That turned into quite a rant.

Anyway. The Linux desktop is going to continue to move away from
familiar *nix ways because they are historical now. Because the Linux
desktop is only a tiny parasite on the flank of the _vast_ Linux
server market, it gets tooling designed for that.

If you want a more traditional Unix experience, try FreeBSD. It's
thriving off the move to systemd and so on.


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Email: [hidden email] - Google Mail/Hangouts/Plus: [hidden email]
Twitter/Facebook/Flickr: lproven - Skype/LinkedIn: liamproven
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Re: resolv.conf questions

Robert Heller
At Fri, 9 Aug 2019 14:07:43 +0200 "Ubuntu user technical support,  not for general discussions" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> On Thu, 8 Aug 2019 at 22:53, Tomas Zubiri <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > https://askubuntu.com/questions/662863/manually-edit-dns-in-ubuntu-14-04
> >
> > Dear Ubuntu developers, /etc/ files are user interfaces, stop breaking them.
> >
> > Thank you very much.
>
> Please bottom-post on mailing lists.
>
> Sadly, though, I have to disagree.
>
> Linux is big business now. Mostly on servers.
>
> The only significant user-facing ones are Android and ChromeOS, which
> are both dramatically constrained systems, which is part of why
> they've been successful. It is taking desktop distro vendors *way* too
> long to catch up with what they are doing, but distros like Endless,
> and to a lesser extent Fedora Silverblue, are showing the way:
> * all apps containerised; no inter-app dependencies at all
> * OS image shipped as a complete, tested image
> * Most of the filesystem is read-only
> * no package manager, no end-user ability to install/remove/update
> packages. You get a whole new OS image periodically, like on a phone.
> * OS updates are transactional: it deploys the whole thing, and if it
> doesn't work, it rolls back the entire OS to the last known good
> snapshot. 2+ OS snapshots are maintained at any time so there should
> always be a good one.
>
> This is a good thing. Software bloat is vast now. OSes are too complex
> for most people to understand, maintain, or fix. So you don't. Even
> the ability is removed.
>
> This is in parallel with server deployments:
> * everything is virtualised: OSes only run in VMs with standardised
> hardware, the network connections are virtualised, the disks are
> virtualised.
> *  VMs are built from templates and deployed automatically as needed,
> and destroyed again as needed.
> * there is as little as possible local state in any VM. It gets its
> state info automatically from a database over the network. The
> database is in a VM too, of course.
> * as few local config files as possible; config is kept in a database
> too and pushed out to local database instances
>
> I could go on.
>
> Unix is a late-1960s OS designed for late-1960s minicomputers:
> * big standalone non-networkerd servers with lots of small disks,
> shared by multiple interactive users on dumb text terminals
> * users built their own software from source
> * everything is a text file. Editors and piping are key tools.
>
> With some 1970s tech on top that the industry spent 25 years getting
> working stably:
> * framebuffers and hi-res graphic displays are possible but very expensive
> * so, design for graphical terminals, or micros that are dedicated
> display servers
> * programs run over the network, executing on 1 machine, displaying on another
> * Ethernet networking has been bolted on. TCP/IP is the main protocol.
> * because GUIs and networking are add-ons, they break the "everything
> is a file" model. This is ignored. Editors etc do not allow for it yet
> alone use it.
> * machines treat one another as hostile. There is no federation, no
> process migration, etc.
>
> Then in the 1980s this moribund minicomputer OS got a 2nd lease of
> life and started selling well because microcomputers  got powerful
> enough to run it, growing up into expensive high-power workstations:
> * some effort at network integration: tools were bolted on top for
> distributing text-only config files automatically, machines could
> query each other to find resources
> * encryption was added for moving stuff over untrusted networks
> * a lot of focus on powerful programming tools and things like maths
> tools, 3D modelling tools
> * very little focus on user-friendliness or ease of use, as that
> sector was dominated by Macs, Amigas etc.
> * much of this stuff is proprietary because of the nature of the business model.
> * server support is half-hearted as there are dedicated server OSes for that
>
> In the 1990s things changed again:
> * plain cheap PCs became powerful enough to run Unix usefully
> * the existing vendors flailed around trying to sell it but mostly
> failed as they kept their very expensive pricing models from the
> workstation era
> * FOSS re-implementations replace it, piggybacking on tech developed for Windows
> * After about 1½ decades of work, the leading FOSS *nix becomes a
> usable desktop OS. Linux wins. FreeBSD trails, but has some good work
> -- much of this goes into Mac OS X
>
> Early 21st century:
> * high-speed Internet access can be assumed
Um...  Nope.  NOT A GOOD ASSUMPTION.  *I* am *still* using Dial-up Internet.

*Much* of rural America *does not have* high-speed Internet.  Really!

> * non-technical end-users become a primary "market"
> * now it runs on local 64-bit multi-CPU micros with essentially infinite disk
> * it has a local 3D accelerator for a display
>
> Results...
> * traditional troubleshooting/fault finding is obsolete. No need for
> keeping admin tools separate from user tools, no need for /bin and
> /sbin, /usr/bin and /usr/sbin, etc. Boot off a DVD or a USB, recover
> user data if any, nuke the OS and reload.
> * GUIs favour 3D chrome. When harmony is achieved & everyone
> standardises on GNOME 2, Microsoft attacks it and destroys it,
> resulting in vast duplication of desktop functionality and a huge
> amount of wasted effort.
> * Because of poor app portability between distros, just like in the
> days of proprietary Unix, only a few big-name apps exist for all
> distros.
> * Linux is mainly only usable for Web/email/chat/simple office stuff,
> and traditional coder work. Windows and Mac hoover up all of the
> rich-local-apps market, including games. Linux vendors do not even
> notice.
> * Linux on conventional desktops/laptops is weak, but that market is
> shrinking fast. But...
> * not-really-Linux-any-more phone/tablet OSes are thriving
> * consumer Internet use is huge, for content consumption, social
> networking, and retail
>
> This drives a need for vast server farms, with the lowest possible
> unit software cost.
> * tools for automation -- for deployment, management, scaling -- are big money
> * because the job market is huge, skill levels are relatively low, so
> automated distribution of workloads is key:
> - tools for deploying & re-deploying VM images automatically in case
> of failure of the contained app
> - tools for large teams to interwork on incremental, iterative
> software development
> - bolting together existing components, automated building and testing
> and packaging and deployment
> * as the only significant successful end-user apps are web browsers,
> all tools move onto the web platform:
> - web mail
> - web chat
> - web media
> - web file storage
> - web config management
> * Result: tooling written in Web tools -- JavaScript -- displaying
> over Web UIs (browser rendering engines)
> * On the server end, inefficiency can be solved by deploying more
> servers. They're cheap, the software is free.
> * On the client end, most focus is on fast browsers and using games
> acceleration hardware to deliver fast web browsing, media playback,
> and hardware accelerated UI
>
> So the only possible method of fighting back and trying to deliver
> improved end-user tooling for power users is to use a mixture of web
> tools and games hardware.
>
> Result: OSes that need 3D OpenGL compositing, with desktops and apps
> written in JavaScript, and packaging and deployment methods taken from
> those designed for huge server farms.
>
> * GNOME 3 and Cinnamon, and a distant 3rd, KDE. (The only others are
> principally defined by refusal to conform.)
> * Flatpak, Snappy and a distant 3rd, Appimage
> * systemd and an increasing move away from text files, including for
> config and logging -- server farm tools use database connections,
> because in the 1980s & 1990s, nobody saw any reason to try to copy
> Microsoft's LAN Manager, domains, Novell NDS, Banyan VINES' Streetalk,
> or any other more sophisticated LAN management tools.
>
> Gosh. That turned into quite a rant.
>
> Anyway. The Linux desktop is going to continue to move away from
> familiar *nix ways because they are historical now. Because the Linux
> desktop is only a tiny parasite on the flank of the _vast_ Linux
> server market, it gets tooling designed for that.
>
> If you want a more traditional Unix experience, try FreeBSD. It's
> thriving off the move to systemd and so on.
>
>
--
Robert Heller             -- 978-544-6933
Deepwoods Software        -- Custom Software Services
http://www.deepsoft.com/  -- Linux Administration Services
[hidden email]       -- Webhosting Services
                                                                                             


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Re: resolv.conf questions

Mike Marchywka
On Fri, Aug 09, 2019 at 12:45:03PM -0400, Robert Heller wrote:

> At Fri, 9 Aug 2019 14:07:43 +0200 "Ubuntu user technical support,  not for general discussions" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> >
> > I could go on.
> >
> > Unix is a late-1960s OS designed for late-1960s minicomputers:
> > * big standalone non-networkerd servers with lots of small disks,
> > shared by multiple interactive users on dumb text terminals
> > * users built their own software from source
> > * everything is a text file. Editors and piping are key tools.
> >
...
> >
> > Gosh. That turned into quite a rant.

You see this a lot about how a text oriented whatever is old fashioned
but that is still the best way to convey tractable information in most
cases. You want everything to be emoticons and music?
I thought this news item below was worth noting, as computers and FEM etc were going
to eliminate the need for analytical solutions to anything, and
there is always Mathematica, this comes up,

https://www.linkedin.com/posts/marchywka_a-mexican-physicist-solved-a-2000-year-old-activity-6565217614577090560-ubOu

( this is a bt of a tangent but given how widespread the belief is
in computer numerical methods I thought it was worth a mention )

There are people who want to do things with computers other than just make
pictures or music. AFAICT there is no simple way to explain a chain of menu
selections that has any lifetime to it compared to a script. You may
want to add features, but regardless of pushing the envelope or
trying to get by with a bottleneck it helps if the OS is non-bloated.


> >
> > Anyway. The Linux desktop is going to continue to move away from
> > familiar *nix ways because they are historical now. Because the Linux
> > desktop is only a tiny parasite on the flank of the _vast_ Linux
> > server market, it gets tooling designed for that.
> >
> > If you want a more traditional Unix experience, try FreeBSD. It's
> > thriving off the move to systemd and so on.

Generally I thought 'Beaver made some improvements over my old Debian
on an old emachines and probably if I tweaked the new params it
may have been overall a worthwhile change. There is a lot of fairly
modern numerical code written in Fortran and users probably
don't want to waste resources on other stuff. It is not a question
of tradition as much as what other stuff exists and various tradeoffs
in configuring a system.  


> >
> >
>
> --
> Robert Heller             -- 978-544-6933
> Deepwoods Software        -- Custom Software Services
> http://www.deepsoft.com/  -- Linux Administration Services
> [hidden email]       -- Webhosting Services
>                                                                                              
>

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Re: resolv.conf questions

Tom H-4
In reply to this post by Tomas Zubiri
On Thu, Aug 8, 2019 at 10:53 PM Tomas Zubiri <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> https://askubuntu.com/questions/662863/manually-edit-dns-in-ubuntu-14-04
>
> Dear Ubuntu developers, /etc/ files are user interfaces, stop breaking them.

Please bottom-post.

NM, dhclient, dhcpcd, openresolv, resolvconf, systemd-resolved are
some of the tools that can edit "/etc/resolv.conf" depending on a
system's configuration.

You simply have to establish which app/apps is/are configuring
"/etc/resolv.conf" and set it/them up todo your bidding.

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Re: resolv.conf questions

Tom H-4
In reply to this post by Robert Heller
On Fri, Aug 9, 2019 at 6:47 PM Robert Heller <[hidden email]> wrote:
> At Fri, 9 Aug 2019 14:07:43 +0200 <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> * high-speed Internet access can be assumed
>
> Um... Nope. NOT A GOOD ASSUMPTION. *I* am *still* using Dial-up
> Internet.
>
> *Much* of rural America *does not have* high-speed Internet.
> Really!

A good assumption, statistically speaking.

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Re: resolv.conf questions

Robert Heller
At Sun, 11 Aug 2019 16:24:37 +0200 "Ubuntu user technical support,  not for general discussions" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> On Fri, Aug 9, 2019 at 6:47 PM Robert Heller <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > At Fri, 9 Aug 2019 14:07:43 +0200 <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >>
> >> * high-speed Internet access can be assumed
> >
> > Um... Nope. NOT A GOOD ASSUMPTION. *I* am *still* using Dial-up
> > Internet.
> >
> > *Much* of rural America *does not have* high-speed Internet.
> > Really!
>
> A good assumption, statistically speaking.

Not in America, actually.  Probably a good assumption elsewhere.

>

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http://www.deepsoft.com/  -- Linux Administration Services
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Re: resolv.conf questions

Wade Smart-2
As someone who has invested in, has partnerships with  and
has wisps as clients, def not a good assumption. At least not
through Tx, Ark, OK, Ks, Ms, Colorado. Not in a decade.
Though - Earthlink does still have dial up numbers hahah
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Re: resolv.conf questions

Robert Heller
At Sun, 11 Aug 2019 10:38:59 -0500 "Ubuntu user technical support,  not for general discussions" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> As someone who has invested in, has partnerships with  and
> has wisps as clients, def not a good assumption. At least not
> through Tx, Ark, OK, Ks, Ms, Colorado. Not in a decade.
> Though - Earthlink does still have dial up numbers hahah

The USA seems to be ranked 20th in terms of Internet Connectivity:

https://www.businessinsider.com/the-23-countries-in-the-world-with-the-fastest-internet-speeds-2018-7



--
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Re: resolv.conf questions

Wade Smart-2
> The USA seems to be ranked 20th in terms of Internet Connectivity:

That is for speed - neither connectivity nor related to dial up.
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Re: resolv.conf questions

Gene Heskett-2
In reply to this post by Tom H-4
On Sunday 11 August 2019 10:24:37 Tom H wrote:

> On Fri, Aug 9, 2019 at 6:47 PM Robert Heller <[hidden email]>
wrote:
> > At Fri, 9 Aug 2019 14:07:43 +0200 <[hidden email]>
wrote:
> >> * high-speed Internet access can be assumed
> >
> > Um... Nope. NOT A GOOD ASSUMPTION. *I* am *still* using Dial-up
> > Internet.
> >
> > *Much* of rural America *does not have* high-speed Internet.
> > Really!
>
> A good assumption, statistically speaking.

While I can get 50Mb from my cable if I want to pay for it, 10Mb is
sufficient for my needs. But I am in a county seat village in WV, USA.

But a friend lives about 40 klicks east and is still served by a mom &
pop who charges by the connection minute when the call goes beyond their
service boundary, she has a 56k modem but the copper is so bad it often
hangs up trying to make a connection to the net provider system in her
county seat of Buchannon, 10 klicks away. She feels like its a good
connection at 2400 baud.

Yes, much of rural America does not have USABLE net speeds. They just
barely have telephone service. Out of the just under a million in this
state, I'd estimate less than 175,000 actually have "high speed"
internet.

The good connections are where the bigger cable operators go, and have
converted their old coax trunk lines to fiber.  That generally stops at
the villages city limits.

Cheers, Gene Heskett
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Re: resolv.conf questions

Gene Heskett-2
In reply to this post by Robert Heller
On Sunday 11 August 2019 12:37:46 Robert Heller wrote:

> At Sun, 11 Aug 2019 10:38:59 -0500 "Ubuntu user technical support,  not
for general discussions" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> > As someone who has invested in, has partnerships with  and
> > has wisps as clients, def not a good assumption. At least not
> > through Tx, Ark, OK, Ks, Ms, Colorado. Not in a decade.
> > Though - Earthlink does still have dial up numbers hahah
>
> The USA seems to be ranked 20th in terms of Internet Connectivity:
>
> https://www.businessinsider.com/the-23-countries-in-the-world-with-the
>-fastest-internet-speeds-2018-7
>
This is true. My former employer bought a ranch in Colorado, 23,000 acres
NE of Douglass Pass, and leased another 220,000 from BLM. His news is by
noisy radio, and his telephone is a 100 watt moto business radio that
works only in clear weather.
>
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Cheers, Gene Heskett
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 soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
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Re: resolv.conf questions

Eliza
In reply to this post by Gene Heskett-2


在 2019/8/12 0:55, Gene Heskett 写道:
> Yes, much of rural America does not have USABLE net speeds. They just
> barely have telephone service. Out of the just under a million in this
> state, I'd estimate less than 175,000 actually have "high speed"
> internet.

I once used Comcast cable, they had much problems on stability.

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Re: resolv.conf questions

Gene Heskett-2
On Sunday 11 August 2019 23:54:46 Eliza wrote:

> 在 2019/8/12 0:55, Gene Heskett 写道:
> > Yes, much of rural America does not have USABLE net speeds. They
> > just barely have telephone service. Out of the just under a million
> > in this state, I'd estimate less than 175,000 actually have "high
> > speed" internet.
>
> I once used Comcast cable, they had much problems on stability.

I voted with my wallet and switched to Shentel for both phone and net,
about 10 or 11 years back. No cable tv though, we can get around a dozen
channels of digital with a rooftop antenna.

I've had maybe 1% of the problems I was having with what was then
verizons 60+ yo copper. From 1 Jan to mid-May that year I had to file
with the states PUC 4 times to get it fixed, and still only had a phone
for 2 or 3 weeks total. Switching to cable was a breath of fresh air,
much higher quality voice, and whatever net bandwidth I wanted to pay
for.  The only phone/net failures have been really prolonged power
outages. Their battery's run down in about 30 hours. I'm still running
as I've a 20kw nat gas standby on a pad behind the garage, gotta keep my
ladies oxygen running as she's got COPD.

Cheers, Gene Heskett
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 soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)
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 - Louis D. Brandeis
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Re: resolv.conf questions

Eliza


在 2019/8/12 16:20, Gene Heskett 写道:
>> I once used Comcast cable, they had much problems on stability.
> I voted with my wallet and switched to Shentel for both phone and net,
> about 10 or 11 years back. No cable tv though, we can get around a dozen
> channels of digital with a rooftop antenna.

me too. I then switched to DSLextreme which works much better for me.

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Re: resolv.conf questions

Tom H-4
In reply to this post by Robert Heller
On Sun, Aug 11, 2019 at 5:34 PM Robert Heller <[hidden email]> wrote:

> At Sun, 11 Aug 2019 16:24:37 <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On Fri, Aug 9, 2019 at 6:47 PM Robert Heller <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> At Fri, 9 Aug 2019 14:07:43 +0200 <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> * high-speed Internet access can be assumed
>>>
>>> Um... Nope. NOT A GOOD ASSUMPTION. *I* am *still* using Dial-up
>>> Internet.
>>>
>>> *Much* of rural America *does not have* high-speed Internet.
>>> Really!
>>
>> A good assumption, statistically speaking.
>
> Not in America, actually. Probably a good assumption elsewhere.

statistically speaking

statistically speaking

statistically speaking

statistically speaking

You must've missed it in my previous email.

The majority of Americans live in cities where internet service is
good; not as good as South Korea's but good, much better than dial-up.

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Re: resolv.conf questions

Gilles Gravier-2
Statistically means numbers. Here they are:  https://broadbandnow.com/DSL 90% coverage...

Le lun. 12 août 2019 à 10:52, Tom H <[hidden email]> a écrit :
On Sun, Aug 11, 2019 at 5:34 PM Robert Heller <[hidden email]> wrote:
> At Sun, 11 Aug 2019 16:24:37 <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On Fri, Aug 9, 2019 at 6:47 PM Robert Heller <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> At Fri, 9 Aug 2019 14:07:43 +0200 <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> * high-speed Internet access can be assumed
>>>
>>> Um... Nope. NOT A GOOD ASSUMPTION. *I* am *still* using Dial-up
>>> Internet.
>>>
>>> *Much* of rural America *does not have* high-speed Internet.
>>> Really!
>>
>> A good assumption, statistically speaking.
>
> Not in America, actually. Probably a good assumption elsewhere.

statistically speaking

statistically speaking

statistically speaking

statistically speaking

You must've missed it in my previous email.

The majority of Americans live in cities where internet service is
good; not as good as South Korea's but good, much better than dial-up.

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Re: resolv.conf questions

Wade Smart-2
>>Statistically means numbers. Here they are:  https://broadbandnow.com/DSL 90% coverage...
Im calling bs on this coverage. DSL may be offered 'virtually
everywhere' but only
in name. Between ill maintained lines, outdated and weathered lines,
dsl isnt not
a realistic option. This (my opinion) only applies to the density of
cities where there
are lots of potential customers for the phone company to target. This
is not true
outside of cities throughout the midwest. Not with DSL.

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